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  1. 5 points
    Gosh this gyan is so deep that it's so difficult to absorb. I somewhat remember the slide that used to be shown on mysimran.info God | You where the line represents your thoughts (khoor da paal) dividing the two. Problems in Meditation and Their Equivalent When Dying The aspirant will notice (if he is honest enough and truly seeks to know himself) that, in the beginning of his spiritual practice, when he is still struggling with the initial efforts to remain as “present” and as concentrated as he can during his meditation, he has a hidden desire to stop most of the time—and is almost even relieved when he finishes meditating. It is as though he is secretly glad to return to his customary outer-life conditions, once more settling into the ease of his usual vain reveries, habitual feelings, and ordinary preoccupations, preferring all this—including the worries, turmoil, and endless pains this condition brings with it—than to have to make the requisite effort to remain concentrated and present to himself; it is as if, in some inconceivably strange way, he needed all these inner and outer problems to fill an emptiness in his life, which would otherwise be too intolerable to support. The aspirant must clearly see what is happening in him during his meditation (something which, in the usual course of events, would remain concealed from his knowledge) so that the reverse of this way of meditating starts to take place in him. That is to say, instead of secretly wishing to finish his spiritual practice quickly so as to go back to whatever is drawing him outwardly, he will actually long to accomplish rapidly whatever is preoccupying him externally in order to be able to return to his meditation—failing which, there will always be a hidden conflict in him while he is trying to meditate, and his spiritual efforts may then come to nothing. He may finally even be prompted to give up his meditation altogether—something that happens to many seekers without their realizing the true cause for it. But what has been said above must on no account be taken to signify that the seeker should neglect or fulfill his outer duties poorly—for everything must be used as a means to render one more refined, noble, and worthy. When, during his meditation, the aspirant begins to be touched by the effulgence of his Supreme Being, he will, of himself, little by little—through a quiet and subtle discernment that will have imperceptibly germinated in him—start to feel the uselessness of the ordinary aspect of himself in which he has passed the greater part of his earthly existence. He will begin to wish to return continually to this blissful state of reverential inner silence each time he becomes separated from it, in much the same way that someone wants to hear again and again the inspiring strains of a sublime and highly moving piece of music for the feeling of great beauty and subtle truth it inexplicably echoes in the depths of his being. The seeker will, from then onward, ardently look forward to every moment he can get away from his ordinary preoccupations in order to come back to his meditation. And, as he goes deeper into himself, experiencing ever greater states of inner tranquillity and ecstasy, not only will his meditation become less and less difficult, but there will naturally grow in him an untiring desire and love for it. This beatific and immutable state that he will experience during his meditation will become for him the only true reality there is in these ever-changing conditions of an impermanent worldly existence. He will now yearn to be able to maintain this unusual state of inner presence in active life as well. He will perceive for himself the urgent need there is for it. For he will find that the more he can remain present to himself in outer life, the more it will afterward have a positive effect on his meditation as well; and the deeper the absorption in meditation, the more present he will be able to be in active life also. Thus, the one will help the other. At the beginning of his practice, a sincere seeker may have noticed that not only was his restless mind refusing to give up its preoccupations and making him even secretly long to finish meditating in order to return to outer activities that kept surreptitiously calling him to them, but that he was also at times using all kinds of subtle inner arguments and pretexts to cease his meditation and get up—because of the necessity to attend to all sorts of important matters first that urgently needed settling. What he may not really see in the beginning is that to all of these things he was, and still is, painfully attached. As has been said earlier, a reversal of the aspirant’s feelings and way of being during his spiritual practice is of extreme importance and must start to take place in him while he is still alive. Just as, when trying to meditate, something in him refuses to abandon whatever it is preoccupied with and to which it is in fact deeply attached, so, when this momentous hour comes when he will be called upon to relinquish his earthly envelope, the same phenomenon will then take place in him. That is to say, all his thoughts and feelings will, at that crucial moment, be directed out toward the world to which he is unwittingly about to bid farewell and to which he has become accustomed and so desperately attached (it being the only thing he has known). Without being aware of it, his attention will be focused with acute nostalgia and pain mainly on the things he was familiar with, on his unsatisfied desires and on his unrealized dreams, most of which are profitless and weighty baggage, unhelpful to him for the great lone journey he is about to embark upon—a lone journey for which he may now find himself dramatically unprepared. He will sense an inexplicable fear and unconscious refusal to enter and abide in this—hitherto unknown to him—mysterious state, a state of subtle consciousness that will seem to him as an incomprehensible void but which, in reality, is his true condition of Being, the Divine Source from which he and all sentient beings originated. If he has not come to recognize the Sacred in himself while still carrying his mortal body, if he has not arrived at a state of knowing this luminous consciousness and vast cosmic silence during his lifetime—be it only a little—then it will not be possible for him to understand it after he leaves this form of existence. When, in active life, the aspirant learns to be more and more “present”—inwardly connected to his Supreme Source—he will then already and inevitably be practicing this indispensable detachment from the bondage to his ordinary self. And each time he loses the felicity of this inner presence again, he will feel as if shipwrecked and cast on a parched, empty, and harsh desert island. It will then seem to him like a cruel inner death. Like a drowning person gasping for breath, he will feel suffocated and experience a painful need to return once more to the fullness of the celestial aspect of his double nature. He will begin to realize that this is the only true life there is and the only real Source from which a higher wisdom can come. If one’s meditation is to become what it should really be—that is to say, pure in the strictest sense of the word—then it is necessary to be able to perceive clearly whenever this higher state of being has become diluted and mixed up again with one’s ordinary state of consciousness. Meditation in its truest sense requires the utmost vigilance and sincerity on the part of the aspirant. At the same time, care must be taken never to force it. The effort to remain present to oneself, although resolute, must at the same time be a very calm and gentle one. The intensity of this effort has to be in the right proportion, neither too much nor too little. If it is overdone, one will not be able to maintain it, and its aftereffect may be very unpleasant. And if it is underdone, it will lead nowhere: one will simply dream away. The aspirant must also, little by little, learn the subtle art of recognizing when the right and delicate moment has arrived for him cautiously to start relaxing his effort, as well as the extent to which he should do so in order to abandon himself to that which is higher in him without the risk of sinking again into his habitual state. Like a kite that has finally become airborne, he should now let himself be carried by the resplendent light of his Supreme Being and be merged in and “one with” the sublime ocean of this Immutable Celestial Consciousness in him. When the aspirant first starts this spiritual work, he will observe that hardly has he touched a more exalted state in himself than his ordinary self and habitual feeling immediately rise up again like a big tidal wave to engulf it. If, after persistent and patient efforts, he can later find enough strength to sustain this superior state of awareness for longer periods, he will then see with yet greater clarity how difficult it is to keep up the quality of this unusual presence in its purest condition for more than a short while, and how, before he realizes what is happening, this state will have begun to be adulterated once more and mixed up with his customary lower consciousness. If he does not clearly see and understand this problem, then there will always be the risk that whatever light that might reach him from the higher regions of his being will always become mingled with all kinds of fantasies and imaginings from his inferior self, and this ineffable divine flame will once more become smothered before it is given the chance fully to reveal and affirm its august presence in him. And if, during meditation, this luminous expanse of consciousness becomes adulterated and diluted in the slightest degree with his habitual state, it will then inevitably cease to be the Truth. For it cannot mix or coexist with his old self and will unavoidably recede into the background, once more becoming obscured and hidden from him, veiled by the haze of his ordinary thinking. Its place will have been usurped once again by his customary everyday self. The greatest sincerity, integrity, and tenacity are vital at the beginning of the aspirant’s struggles. As he advances, he will, little by little, discover the subtle way of sitting still—being actively passive and vigilantly immobile—whereby, in a simple and natural way, he becomes connected to and “one with” the higher aspect of his being. To fully recognize this exalted state in oneself as being the Ultimate and Supreme Truth is to have found the secret key that will open the door of this enigmatic prison in which one is enclosed, eventually releasing one from the tyranny and bondage of one’s lower nature and of duality. One’s purification and deliverance from all the sufferings that ensued from one’s ordinary self will have now begun. It also signifies the extraordinary hope of eventually overcoming death itself—on condition that one has fully understood what death really is. That is to say, in what sense it is to be taken, in what manner one is “dying” all the time without seeing it, and which aspect of one’s nature is subjected to it.
  2. 4 points
    Listen from 22:30 minutes where he explains stages of gurmantar jap and how to tell How to tell when Sass Giras Parpakh –Only sound of jap (Gurmantar) will remain and body will be forgotten –Rom Rom will start –Mind will enter in Sunn state either via sleep or consciously awake but silent (dhyan) –When you hear sehaj dhun in sunn then listen to this. –No load on body whilst listening (like listening in dream state) –When listening to sehaj dhun (anhad) •Jat/Sat/Sunjam •Mind will get brahm gyan •More anhad sounds •Naad - Toor (Loud Powerful Sound) •Parkash •Amrit Ras •Sunn Mandal / Astral Plane and beyond
  3. 3 points
    sarabatam

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    happy vaishakhi everyone.
  4. 3 points
    Jageera

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Happy Vasakhi to all members and admin of Sikhawareness.
  5. 3 points
    mahanpaapi

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Many many Maharaj Ji's Blessings to all.
  6. 3 points
    chatanga1

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Happy Vaisakhi to all!
  7. 3 points
    Sat1176

    What is Self?

    Liquidasky’s point about using the vices for gristi in small moderation is also mentioned in this katha from time index 31:30.
  8. 3 points
    Sat1176

    What is Self?

    As things generally stand in life, the human being is not, and cannot be, aware of the Divine he carries in him. This silent “Spectator,” this Celestial Consciousness and most faithful friend he has—which is the essence of his being, animating and giving meaning to his life, as well as to the lives of all other human beings, no matter what their race or creed—will remain mysteriously hidden from his inner vision unless it is consciously sought for and he arrives (as a result of the unremitting efforts and time he devotes to its quest) at recognizing it fully through immersing himself in it during his meditation, a state that must later extend itself little by little into his active life as well. Unless a human being has truly known the Sublime in himself through direct inner experience, his conviction in the existence of a higher power, no matter how strong it may be, will (apart from perhaps succeeding in sustaining him a little in moments of adversity and helping make him a somewhat better person than he would otherwise have been) continue to be no more than a mere belief. When looked at from another perspective, taking into account the higher purpose of his incarnate existence, this is far from sufficient to help him know himself in such a way as will leave no shadow of a doubt in him regarding his True Identity, and what he will be reabsorbed into when his time comes to bid farewell to his earthly life and all that he has known during his brief and tumultuous sojourn on this globe. His faith in the existence of a Supreme Power somewhere in the Universe far away from him, though it be very profound and sincere, while it remains just a blind and almost abstract belief, associated with all sorts of conscious or unconscious imaginings about the Sacred, will not only bear no resemblance to the reality, but will also always carry in it the baneful seed of separateness and difference from others—leading to passionate divergences of opinion among the diverse peoples of the world on the nature of this divine power and to the interminable religious quarrels that ensue from such unverified beliefs. Between the higher aspect of a person’s being and his ordinary self is a mysterious, highly fragile, and intangible element—his attention. To whichever side of his double nature his attention is attracted and gravitates, it will, knowingly or unknowingly, immediately start animating and nurturing it—and there he will also inevitably be! Through this quasi–irresistible attraction of gravity that is the strange characteristic of terrestrial existence, the human being’s attention, unless sufficiently constrained to the contrary by the hard blows of outer life, is mainly unconsciously drawn in the direction of least resistance in him, demanding no effort from him to achieve or to maintain. There is no value at all in continuously yielding to this “vegetating” state of inner sleep, as a person generally does, and in unquestioningly conceding to the ever-changing whims and wishful dreaming that keep arising in him—much of which, if viewed objectively, will be found to be impractical and absurd. One does not need to exercise strength of will, be audacious, or possess any talent whatsoever to follow the same drift and path as those of the masses in general. Anyone can accomplish such universal and easy exploits. But the moment that an aspirant decides consciously to alter the habitual direction of the flow of his energies and exert himself to proceed, as it were, upward against this descending force of attraction, then he will immediately encounter strong resistance, both in himself and from outside. He will suddenly become aware, on the one hand, of these inner and outer oppositions, and on the other, of a certain inner awakening that these resistances provoke in him (and the value of which he may not recognize or not sufficiently appreciate at first). In fact, his hope of rousing himself from the ease of mesmeric sleep—this mysterious inner sleep in which most people are tamely content to spend their lives without questioning it—lies in these very challenges that he will come up against inside and outside himself. Just as a fire is ignited through the continual rubbing together of two pieces of wood, so these resistances that a seeker will keep meeting with in himself and in life will serve to create in him the indispensable friction that he needs and without which a living spiritual flame cannot be kindled. That is the reason why they must be viewed with the right attitude and understanding, and not blindly regarded as being extremely irritating and valueless obstacles. The seeker’s regard must start turning inward instead of outward, and this will undeniably demand from him much conscious effort in the beginning, as well as the hard-won inner strength and will to keep redirecting his attention back onto its intended track each time it wanders away from it, until one day he arrives at discerning the miracle of his Supreme Being, this sublime consciousness that has all the time been there, secretly watching him and waiting for him to reverse the direction of his gaze in order to discover it and behold its ineffable beauty, filling him with the inexpressible happiness he has mistakenly been searching for outside himself all the time.
  9. 3 points
    Sat1176

    The Ringing Sound (Anhad; Sound Current)

    I've been left speechless reading the following. May Waheguru bless us all with such bhagti. MUST READ SANGAT JI. Sadhana and Enlightenment (Part One) All the laws of logic and the understanding the human being generally has of the Universe and life dictate that it is inconceivable for him to be able to contemplate his physical self without the aid of some external instrument such as a mirror, a piece of metal, a clear pond, and so on. As to the contemplation of one’s inner or spiritual self, this would normally be considered to be not only totally impossible but even grossly illogical and ludicrous. However, an enlightened being knows, through direct personal experience, that during deep meditation, as one rises to higher planes of consciousness, one attains to other dimensions where the ordinarily inconceivable act of the contemplation of one’s incorporeal Self does indeed become miraculously possible, albeit in a manner wholly inexplicable and incomprehensible to the rational mind. This extraordinary state can be experienced only from deep within and is perceived as a vast and transparent Self without form, spreading out in all directions beyond the physical frame into infinity, a mysterious and formless “Spectator” plunged in silent Self- contemplation. Like a limitless ocean of consciousness without beginning or end, this invisible Self, although formless, has a reality about it that is immeasurably greater than one’s tangible earthly body. Indeed, compared to this unusual state of being, the physical form loses all reality. In this sacred state, the contemplator, the contemplated, and the contemplation are all three united in one. It is a very mysterious and inexplicable act, in which, paradoxically, there is contemplation of the Self at the same time as being the Self that is contemplated. While merged in it, one has the strange feeling of going back into Eternity to one’s Supreme Source. One is pervaded with a sensation of indescribable purity, as well as a blissful feeling of vast “cosmic aloneness” and profound inner peace, surpassing anything one can know of in one’s habitual outer existence. Something of this unusual and beatific state must start to accompany the seeker when occupied in his daily work as well. At first, this will demand from him very delicate and repeated efforts of inner presence while simultaneously abandoning himself to the Sublime in him. Through the patient repetition of these subtle efforts, he will help create the necessary conditions for the transformation of himself, ultimately allowing his higher nature to occupy its rightful place in the celestial city of his being and rule through him. He will thus become a channel for the fulfillment of the Divine Will in himself and on the lower planes of existence. In carrying over this effulgent flame to the somber regions of his nature and to where there is the greatest need for it, he will, through the higher understanding he has so painstakingly acquired, show the way to alleviate the suffering of a forlorn and despairing humanity. After having found this light in himself, the aspirant may at first want only to retire into the quietness and felicity of his inner being, refusing all else. Intoxicated with this celestial wine, he may be tempted to wish solely to lose himself in this beatific state, rejecting the outer world altogether— an outer world that, by comparison, will now seem so crude and dissonant. He will be like a man deeply in love, having found a woman whose extraordinary beauty is beyond anything he could have ever dreamed of before, neglecting everything in life so as to be with her all the time. He may even believe that he has attained all there is to attain and know, and that there is nothing more for him to do but remain tranquil in this heavenly abode or Nirvana that he has, through much effort, deservedly earned. But, alas, it is not so easy as all that. As said earlier, enlightenment does not necessarily mean liberation. It should also not be forgotten that there are different degrees of enlightenment. For the great majority of seekers, enlightenment (if it did take place in them) signifies purely the start of this arduous journey toward their emancipation. Only outer life can provide the conditions the human being requires through which he can learn to know himself better, to find courage in the face of repeated adversities or defeats, not to hate when being wronged, not to take what rightly belongs to another, not to cause suffering around him in satisfying a transitory desire, not to behave dishonorably toward another for selfish reasons, and so on. Enlightenment is but the outset of real sadhana. It is the start of a lifetime’s work and study. For one must not forget where one has started from: one’s untransformed tendencies, as well as one’s sexual urges and other needs, will again and again raise their hungry heads and plague one. Even if a seeker decides to shut himself away from the world completely, he will find that, sooner or later, unless he is one of the rare exceptions, he will be forced out of his retreat, both to satisfy the exigencies of his various wants and by the necessity for him to put his spiritual work into practice in active life also. As in all domains, the right balance must be found between meditation and active life to permit true and healthy spiritual growth to take place. One needs to breathe in in order to breathe out, but one must also breathe out in order to be able to breathe in again. In spite of all the unusual spiritual experiences he may have had, the aspirant will have to face the hard fact that he is still an incomplete being, full of hidden undesirable tendencies, lacking in will and inner strength, and as yet unworthy to serve in a befitting manner. Even if at this stage he tries to impart to others whatever higher knowledge he may have gained, the latter risks being mixed up with inaccuracies, spiritual pride, and sometimes even salted and peppered with a little fantasy born of the concealed desire to appear important in other people’s eyes. If, after having known the luminous aspect of his being, an aspirant cannot raise in himself the strong and sincere wish to know the dark side of his nature as well— perhaps thinking that because of the lofty spiritual experiences he has had, this is no longer important— then he will render his emancipation very uncertain, if not impracticable. The discovery of the Sublime in oneself does not mean the immediate release from the bondage to one’s inferior nature. This divine light must not be misused solely in wanting to withdraw into the bliss of its celestial oasis. It could unconsciously remain a mere desire to escape into higher states only, which— because of one’s level of being— will not in any case last very long before weakening and becoming diluted with one’s ordinary state of consciousness, finally receding into the background, leaving one desolate again in the aridity of one’s habitual state. If, without really understanding what it involves, a seeker remains as he is, then each time he tries to touch these higher states again, they will last for short periods only, and without his realizing why, he will find himself continually flung back to the level that corresponds to his degree of evolution. If the aspirant cannot muster in himself the inner courage patiently to face and suffer again and again the truth of what he is in himself, with all his open or hidden negativities, ill will, conceit, laziness, instability, stupidity, unreliability, and so on, then his sadhana will not have fulfilled its true function for his transformation. It will simply remain a high- sounding word in his mouth, empty and unproductive, like a seed fallen on poor soil. He may not realize it at first, but, each time he can see himself as he is, a mysterious alchemy takes place in him, creating the right and probably only condition for his transformation. Although he will sometimes discover very distasteful things about himself, he must be careful not to brood negatively on them, forgetting the light that is eternally shining there behind them and through which they were seen. Part Two Without the aspirant reaching some degree of enlightenment, the real practice of sadhana cannot begin. He will not understand what this work is about and what is ultimately at stake for him. He will simply remain a prisoner of fantastic ideas and imaginings on spirituality arising from his ordinary self, containing no truth in them whatever. At the most, his concepts will be no more than a collection of intellectual speculations on the enigma of one’s being and existence— perhaps made with much good intention but having no foundation in nor any bearing on reality. In the end, all this will lead nowhere; it will certainly not bring him any nearer to the realization of his True Nature and to a correct comprehension of the hidden meaning behind life and death. Although it is absolutely right that the aspirant at first strive after enlightenment, it is also extremely important for him to understand that, paradoxically, he must under no circumstances do his spiritual practice with either the conscious or unconscious intention of obtaining results. Whatever the subject of his meditation, whether concentration on the lower abdomen while breathing, concentration on the mystical sound inside his ears, concentration on his feet in the slow walking exercise, concentration on a certain chakra (psychic center) situated between the nose and upper lip, he must be very careful not to seek unusual phenomena, even perhaps unknowingly, nor to be constantly on the lookout for results, nor project his imagination in advance of what he thinks illumination might be. All these things will certainly hinder him in his endeavors, which will continuously be colored by the desires and fantasies of his ordinary self, interfering instead of getting out of the way. The aspirant must learn, especially at the beginning of his practice, to concentrate on the subject of his meditation for the love of doing it and for no other reason. Generally, when meditating, the majority of people lose patience without being aware of it and relax the intensity of their concentration just at the very moment when they should more than ever be keeping it up and plunging ever deeper into themselves. Thus, they are never able to pass beyond a certain threshold in their being. But this should not be misunderstood. It is not at all meant as an incitement to be brutal in one’s endeavors, using violence in such sacred work— sacred work that, on the contrary, demands a most delicate approach and subtle understanding. Although it is true that one’s effort must be very firm and sustained, at the same time— as was repeatedly said earlier— it has to be extremely gentle and tranquil, accompanied by the simultaneous surrendering of oneself. The essential thing in meditation is to arrive at experiencing and recognizing with absolute certainty this sublime consciousness in oneself, this subtle, vast, and luminous consciousness that each being unknowingly carries deep within him. There are different paths to arrive at this supreme realization, and under the guidance of a master, this revelation can be attained either rapidly or progressively— depending on how ripe and ready the seeker is for it. But if an aspirant is striving without a guide, he may abruptly touch unusual states or go through exceptionally powerful experiences ordinarily absolutely inconceivable, which may later perturb him if he is not sufficiently prepared for them. It is to avoid any unnecessary shock for someone working alone, as well as to help him better understand his own spiritual experiences, that the following personal experience is recounted— fully realizing that this does not in any way imply everyone will pass through exactly the same states in exactly the same manner to arrive at a comprehension of his True Being. It is told simply to help him should he experience something similar. One day, after having gone through the most terrible suffering and despair, as the author was meditating, and as he kept plunging ever more deeply into himself, stubbornly holding onto the subject of his meditation with growing but quiet determination while at the same time constantly increasing the intensity and strength of his concentration without at any moment letting it falter or fluctuate, abruptly, as the sensation of his body became ever finer and more rarefied, this sacred Nada inside his ears started to vibrate in a most unusual way, thundering in his head with an incredible power and shrillness he had not known before. Suddenly, with a formidable force and astonishing rapidity, he was sucked up to the top of his skull. At the same time, he felt that his forehead had ripped open from inside, and the vision of his two eyes had inwardly merged into the center of his forehead. Simultaneously, he had the strong and strange feeling of having died and gone back to his Source of origin. He was also seized with the inexpressible sensation that he was immersed in and united with the Great Whole, and that he had discovered and understood the mysterious secret behind life, the stars, and the Universe. He was equally pervaded with an extraordinary sense of immense “cosmic aloneness.” An eternal vast silence reigned. Afterward, and for many days, his body seemed incredibly light and free, as if transmuted into ether. Something of this sensation has remained with him ever since. He also experienced a strange and indefinable state of well- being, bathed in an ineffable inner stillness, contentment, and indescribable feeling of love hitherto unknown to him, a profound melting tenderness in the solar plexus— as that of a speechless mother who, after many years of painful separation and suffering, has been unexpectedly reunited with her only child whom she long thought lost. Later, as he tried to formulate into words the strange secret he had discovered concerning life, the stars, and the Universe, he found himself utterly unable to do so. Although the reality of this mysterious comprehension has always stayed with him from that day onward, yet he has never been able to translate it to himself in any known language. He has also found it necessary to keep largely silent on such out- of- the- ordinary matters. These are intimate experiences between the Divine and oneself that cannot be shared with anyone else. Moreover, through this unusual spiritual experience, he had, without having fully understood it at first, received a foretaste and subtle knowledge of the after- death state, a subtle knowledge and higher understanding that have kept silently growing in him, becoming ever clearer, deeper, and more affirmative each time he sat and meditated again. Here also, he deemed it absolutely necessary and expedient never to speak about such a revelation to anyone. Apart from the reasons already mentioned, his silence is also to avoid wrong ideas about the supernatural from arising in the minds of people who might later desecrate a thing of such weighty importance, distorting it in reducing it to their own level of understanding. From that momentous day onward, his existence took an entirely different meaning for him. His thoughts and feelings flowed in a new direction, and his aims in life changed drastically. He looked upon everything from another perspective and in a totally new light. All the things that used to interest him in the past, and that had seemed so important before, suddenly meant nothing to him anymore. He began to see in everyone, without exception, the same Cosmic Consciousness animating their lives, only they are ignorant of it. It is crucified in them and will sadly remain so until they bring themselves to desire it above all else and succeed in making the necessary efforts to seek and discover it— a discovery that will bring in its wake a very particular understanding of the reason and sense of their lives, of where they originated, and into what they will one day be reabsorbed when this form of existence comes to its end for them, as it inevitably will do. Through this inner awakening, or rebirth, they will then start to live in, and through, the higher aspect of their nature, conscious of the supreme Unity behind all sentient beings and the seeming separateness of things. He equally saw the imperative need to strive to maintain as far as possible a state of self- recollectedness in active life as well. This ever- so subtle inward movement, or rather descent into oneself— which has to be continually renewed— is the key to the understanding of real inner presence. This inner descending movement is, in a certain way, always possible to accomplish, and one will find that, at the very instant when this descent into oneself is effected, the renunciation of one’s ordinary state of being mysteriously takes place at the same time. Later, other strange phenomena occurred during the author’s meditation: sometimes he was seized with a mysterious involuntary shaking of the entire trunk or the head, while at other times a gentle unintentional swaying of the body took place, all of which could last for a considerable length of time before stopping; on other occasions, he felt a strong and pleasant pressure on the top of the skull, at the back of the head, or in the region of the throat with the chin involuntarily pressing tightly against the neck— similar to the Jalandhara pose in Hatha Yoga. At other times, the whole of his abdomen would, of itself, extend outward and rise in a surprising manner, pressing against the solar plexus with considerable force. It would remain in this distended and suspended position for quite a long time— inconceivable in normal conditions. Now and then, he would feel himself taken by an invisible force and, in spite of himself, made to dance in his room in a most strange and ecstatic way while the strains of celestial music vibrated throughout his being. This strange sensation of the opening of the center of his forehead from inside has never left the author. Since the day it occurred it is as if, in some mysterious way, he is always looking out at the world deep from the back of his head at the same time as through the center of his forehead and his physical eyes. His experience also led him to the discovery that he could, through the power of Grace, confer upon another a direct silent transmission. Although this will without doubt be of inestimable help to a seeker, it will, nevertheless, not spare him his share of the efforts that he will have to make throughout his entire life. Part Three When the aspirant has arrived at experiencing and recognizing this out- of- the- ordinary state of consciousness in him as being his Supreme Nature, appreciating its capital value and profound importance for his transformation, he will come to see for himself the urgent need for him to always strive to turn to it, not only during the moments when he sits quietly and meditates but in his active life as well. For he will find that while he is inwardly present to this higher aspect of his being, he cannot any more conduct himself under its intransigent gaze in the same way as he does when in his ordinary state of being. All the things that he generally thinks, says, and does when sunk in the habitual condition of unmindfulness are inconceivable in a state of self- recollectedness. He will perceive that, as long as he is aware of himself, inwardly connected to his Supreme Being, he will not be able to do other than act in conformity to this hallowed Witness. His thoughts, speech, and actions will inevitably be influenced and governed by a higher knowledge and very particular understanding proceeding from it, rendering him compassionate in his contact with the outer world and conscious of the feelings, problems, and sufferings of others. And he will discover that, as soon as he forgets himself again, becoming inwardly disconnected from his True Source, he will start once more to behave through his ordinary lower self, with all its blind urges for the immediate relief of its discomforts, as well as the gratification of its ever- changing cravings and ambitions, oblivious of the consequences of its actions and the unhappiness it inflicts around it, its personal satisfaction being the only thing it knows and cares for. When the seeker is identified with this side of his nature, he generally, knowingly or not, approaches others solely through his needs and desires, which impel him to act mainly in his own interest. Like an iceberg whose biggest and most important part remains submerged and hidden from sight, the human being’s most essential aspect lies mysteriously veiled beneath the mists of his illusory ordinary self. And, because the desires and clamors of this perceptible little self are so noisy, he is impelled to notice only this small part of himself, totally unaware of the majesty of his Supreme Nature concealed behind all this wild uproar in him. To arrive at perceiving the huge and vital part of an iceberg covered from view, it is necessary to make the effort of plunging into the waters that surround the small exposed fragment. Enlightenment reveals how little and insignificant is the visible aspect of the human being, but attaining enlightenment is not easy. Not only does it demand much patient struggle from the seeker but also, and above all, a profound and sustained sincerity. This spiritual struggle equally signifies the start of true sincerity in the aspirant’s relationship with the outside world. For, although he may not be especially aware of it at the time, the very desire to be sincere inevitably entails a very special and subtle effort for its fulfillment, which— at the instant when he is being sincere— automatically brings with it an inward movement, or rather, a particular descent into himself that the seeker normally does not perceive. This descent into himself is the start of and key to self- recollectedness— even though, in the beginning, he may not necessarily recognize or sufficiently understand it. Furthermore, he may also not fully comprehend nor appreciate the secret action and effect this mysterious descent into himself has, both on his feelings and on his mind. Thus, he might perhaps let slip a precious opportunity and means for opening the door that can eventually lead to the realization of his True Nature. All strivings to be sincere call for an act of inner presence, which is the start of inner awakening and the “pushing out of the way” of the seeker’s ordinary self to be replaced by something more worthy. Sincerity, to both himself and others, is the beginning and the end of all things. It is, in any case, unquestionably the basis of all spiritual search. Without it, enlightenment is absolutely impossible. Sincerity is also the very life and force of all great artistic creations. The exalted feelings that a sublime musical work inspires in its listeners are nothing less than the expression of the same lofty sentiments and profound sincerity its creator, the composer, had in him at the time of its creation. For it is solely in the degree to which a composer is himself stirred and elevated when working that he will stir and elevate his audience (if they are receptive enough), and the depth of his sincerity cannot fail but evoke its equivalent in them. The mysterious effect that music can have on the feelings and thoughts of those who listen to it is often colossal. It can even be strangely disquieting at times, showing the terrible responsibility a composer has to all who come under the influence of his music and receive in their being the subtle suggestions his work secretly imparts to them. Ordinarily, there is no way of explaining life and death. To understand life and its meaning, it is necessary to understand death a little; and to understand death a little, it is equally necessary to understand life better— and above all, “That” which is behind it, animating it and sustaining the whole Universe. It would seem there is no possibility of finding the answer to this enigma if it were not that, during particularly profound mystical states in meditation, one can have some foretaste and subtle knowledge of the after- death state— that is to say, into what one will be reabsorbed on leaving this form of existence. Understanding death a little better helps one understand life a little better too, and understanding life a little better helps one understand death also a little better, until one finally arrives at discovering that these two conditions mysteriously merge into one another, revealing a state of nondifferentiation between them— just as there is only one atmosphere surrounding the globe, unchanging in its essence, whether it is day or whether it is night. But these are understandings that can never be clearly and correctly expressed in words. One cannot explain such things beyond a certain limit: firstly, because it would not be possible to avoid distorting them to some degree; and secondly, to prevent their being misunderstood and misrepresented later by others. In addition to the above reasons, the author, having received no education, is extremely mistrustful of himself, considering himself far from qualified to put into words, beyond a certain point, revelations of such importance. Ultimately, each person must seek out and live these extraordinary experiences and truths for himself to be able to understand them. They cannot be understood with the mind, nor transmitted intellectually. In fact, the mind is a veritable handicap in this area. The subtle language of great symphonic music can sometimes explain life and its meaning in a manner that can never be done intellectually nor understood with the rational mind, even though it should not be forgotten that, no matter how great a work of art may be, it is still mixed up to some degree, be it ever so slight, with the artist’s habitual state of being. However, this does not exclude the fact that very elevated feelings and subtle understandings reaching him from higher invisible spheres can, to some extent, mysteriously be translated into music. Its wordless speech, made up of exalted sentiments and silent suggestions, immediately touch the listener’s very being and is secretly understood by him through direct intuition. Although great beauty and spiritual truths can be transmitted through the medium of literature and speech, nevertheless, there is always a considerable danger of their being misinterpreted, each person understanding them in his own way according to his education and conditioning, which, in turn, leads to his deforming them, often resulting in fierce dissension and violence between people. But there is a superior kind of art, or medium of transmission, where the intellect and mouth are silenced. In this form of art, the beauty and spiritual truths imparted are received directly by the eye through sacred paintings, religious sculptures, certain forms of dancing (in particular Indian dancing), and special architectural masterpieces (such as temples, shrines, mosques, and so forth), with a lesser possibility existing of deforming these truths. However, an even higher form of art exists in which the intellect, the mouth, and the eyes are completely passive. The spiritual truths, beauty, and love communicated are received directly through the feelings by the subtle language of music that vibrates deep inside the listener’s heart. Here, the chances of misrepresenting these truths are greatly reduced. For, whatever their creed or race, and no matter where they happen to be, when a group of people are assembled together, listening to the sublime harmonies and wonderful orchestral “colors” of a great symphonic work secretly imparting to them an ineffable truth through expressions of elevated sentiments, the minds, thoughts, and feelings of all are then united in one silent communion. At that exalted hour, words have lost all their meaning. If the aspirant is receptive enough, he will discover that listening to certain music can mysteriously help bring about this important descent into himself spoken of earlier. Some rare beings gifted with very unusual sincerity, capacity of concentration, and great sensitivity, rendering them capable of capturing these invisible influences coming from “the spheres of the gods,” are chosen by higher forces— and are, in an ordinarily incomprehensible way, sacrificed— to transmit to the world through music a ray of light and the enigmatic message of this inward descent into oneself. The force born of the unusual sincerity that some rare composers have in them during their creative moments is something that only someone who has experienced it himself in some form or another can understand, appreciate, and speak of. The inspiration and aesthetic sentiments that move a genius in his periods of creativity can arise in him only in a state of extreme inner stillness, receptivity, and exceptional sincerity, rendering every note he writes inevitable. That is to say, each note of the theme and harmony of his music go where they ought to go and could not possibly have gone anywhere else, evoking in the listener the strange feeling of rediscovering an evident truth that he seems to know already from some enigmatic source— even though he is, in fact, listening to this music for the first time in his life. Apart from the profound sentiments and lofty intimations that some musical masterpieces convey (like a mysterious wind blowing from an invisible and strange land, whispering softly inside the ear of humanity an ever- so- subtle message), the particular sort of tenderness and unusual love that music (especially Indian music) sometimes communicates to the human soul are perhaps its most important contribution to the field of art. This kind of love does not in any way resemble the ordinary love one is familiar with in life, which is always directed outwardly to something or somebody, and mainly aroused through desire. Such love is unstable and unpredictable, influenced by outer circumstances and the need of the moment. It changes like the wind, and is even often transformed into its contrary. The unusually tender love that one encounters in music, speaking subtly to the heart of the human being in the sublime language of the gods, sometimes moving him to tears without any apparent reason for it, comes down to him as an indication pointing the way inward, secretly influencing his feelings and opening his mind to something higher that he otherwise could not experience nor know of in his customary state of being. More so even than in art, sincerity in meditation and sadhana is absolutely vital. It is the essential pillar upon which all spiritual efforts must rest and is unquestionably the seeker’s strongest arm and protection in his difficult quest. Without genuine and profound sincerity, he will merely dream that he is meditating or practicing a sadhana. Each time the aspirant sits and meditates, he has to do it with all his being, with ever renewed sincerity, always meditating as if for the first time, no matter what exalted spiritual experiences he may have been privileged with before. To help an aspirant who— depending on his type and temperament— may pass through similar experiences as those of the author (who was atrociously alone at that time, with no one around him capable of sufficiently understanding his problems, needs, and sufferings to guide him), the following painful trials he underwent will be indirectly recounted, together with some important advice for the seeker. As the aspirant quietly descends into himself during his meditation, remaining inwardly ever so still and silent in a state of continual self- abandonment, a moment may come when, through Divine Grace, he will be stirred by a most unusual feeling of love, filling him with a sublime and tender melting sensation spreading all around from his solar plexus, a sensation so unusual and strong that he may afterward find himself weeping violently without fully understanding why. This out- of- the- ordinary sentiment may, in a very inadequate way, be compared to the strange sensation of experiencing extreme sadness and happiness simultaneously, such as the intense emotions of a bereaved woman who, having lost her beloved under tragic circumstances, suddenly dreams of him in her sleep and is so overcome with joy and affection at seeing him whom she believed dead that her heart is gripped with the most singular feeling of profound pain and felicity as she ever- so- fondly tries to smile at him while shedding endless tears of bliss in her dream. The experience of this uncommon love will deeply affect and mark the seeker. He will unmistakably recognize that what has taken place in him is an out- of- the- ordinary sentiment of mystical love, a most tender and strange love that cannot be compared to anything one normally knows in life. For in this case, this particular love is not stimulated by nor directed to anyone or anything external. There is simply an inexplicable state of love, a most unusual melting sentiment of profound mystical love that one has become immersed in and one with. When the seeker first goes through this unusual experience, he may be so deeply moved that he will afterward find his whole body shaking with the weeping that this strange and ecstatic love will have provoked in him. This intense weeping with which he is so suddenly seized is mainly due to an aspect of his being that is not ready to support such an uncommon and powerful experience, and he has to be extremely careful afterward, since there is the risk in such cases of a destructive emotional state settling in without perhaps his being aware of it. If allowed to remain, it will be very difficult to dislodge, for, strangely enough, one can become attached to this emotional state, which will then devour the person in whom it has installed itself, rendering him tense, withdrawn, and melancholic, unable to work and only wanting to retire ever further into himself and brood on this experience. The danger is even greater when it is accompanied with the avid desire to relive these intense moments. If the seeker gives in to this craving, it will seriously perturb all his future meditations. It will become an obsession, constantly gnawing at him, and drawing him away from what his true aim should be. He will then go through much torment and suffering before he realizes his mistake. This warning applies equally to all other powerful mystical phenomena or states that the seeker may go through. He should never at any time, either consciously or unconsciously, seek to recreate such moments, no matter how fascinating and wonderful they may have been. It is important in any case to understand that experiences of such an extraordinary nature cannot come again at one’s command, in exactly the same manner, bringing with them exactly the same states that one has had before. The aspirant will have to realize that both he and the conditions that helped bring on these states have changed. As already repeatedly stressed, he must learn to cultivate in himself the attitude and subtle art of always starting his meditation with the utmost sincerity and inner stillness as if it were for the first time, forgetting all that took place on previous occasions. Although during one’s meditation one sometimes experiences very strange mystical phenomena and is given foretastes of transcendent emotional states, it should be understood that this does not necessarily mean that one has fully earned or deserved them. They may come as an encouragement and subtle indication only, silently showing the way, according to the particular need of the moment, before being partially withdrawn from the seeker for a certain time. He may afterward have to pass again through terrible moments of uncertainty and despair until he succeeds in making the right efforts to rise to yet greater heights in himself. At that time, other experiences will unexpectedly come to help him advance still further in his spiritual journey. As a result of all his previous inner work he may, at certain privileged moments, suddenly touch a higher dimension and mysteriously see what will seem to him to be all the different aspects and different possibilities of a thing or a situation simultaneously. But the aspirant has to be extremely circumspect afterward, and watch that these exalted states and out- of- the- ordinary experiences that he is sometimes permitted to have are not immediately taken by his lower self and used for itself. There is a lot of stupidity, foolish ideas, and egotism in every man and woman that have to be “knocked out” of them, and this “cleaning up” of oneself is not achieved without much struggle, pain, and suffering. As the seeker becomes more practiced and mature, his lower nature will also have undergone much transformation through all these lofty spiritual experiences and the higher understanding they have brought him. Then a profound cosmic stillness will descend upon him when meditating, and this ineffable state of ecstatic love will also have a different effect on him; he will feel a very tranquil but sublime tenderness into which he will quietly merge; and, as always during such out- of- the- ordinary moments, this enigmatic Nada will more than ever make its presence felt and, with its eternal jewel- like glitter, sing in his ears its supernal song at the same time as it helps him increase his inner absorption. This, as it deepens, will always bring him the strange yet curiously familiar sensation of having returned to the mysterious Source whence he originated, and to which he belongs. The way this divine flame may affect an aspirant the first time it illuminates his being with its ineffable love can be compared to that of a fierce fire consuming a log of wood, its flames leaping about wildly in all directions in the wind. And the way it will affect him later, when he will have acquired deeper spiritual comprehension, more control over his thoughts, and greater inner calm, can be compared to the immobile, soft, and beautiful flame of a candle on a perfectly windless evening. Something of this beatific state will— apart from the moments when he sits alone and meditates— afterward extend itself of its own accord into the seeker’s active life, silently stirring him with a melting feeling of quiescent and compassionate love.
  10. 3 points
    No. There are differences to the style of writing as well. One is a translation based on the Devi wars from Markendey Puran. The other is in Guru Sahibs own words.
  11. 3 points
    Some people do jaap of Gurmantar to keep the mind present during a walk. Wahe left foot, Guru right foot. The Practice of Concentration While Walking Outside All men and women have in them, without knowing it, an enormous reserve of strength and energy, much of which remains unused. If these forces are not consciously channelled and constructively utilized into some form of physical, intellectual, or artistic work, then, like milk that turns sour when left standing, these forces will turn negative, or even become destructive—as can often be seen in many children and adults. For special reasons that may not be comprehensible to the ordinary person, life always procreates in an excess of abundance—but cosmic laws demand that nothing in the Universe can remain static or unused or be wasted. When unproductive, these forces will—depending on the person’s type and temperament—either go inward, acting against the person himself and eventually destroying him without his being aware of it, being used up in worries, anxieties, and restlessness, or they will flow outwardly, into sensuality, propagating tensions and strife around him—and even, on a wider scale, in engendering wars! These extra energies in the human being are destined to be utilized for his spiritual quest and struggles, as well as to adorn the world with the beauties of great artistic creations. When these higher aims are not fulfilled, then, as always, gravity will pull these forces in the only other direction they can go—downward. Most states of depression, negative emotions, and sensual desires are generally indications of unused energies. A vigilant aspirant should immediately recognize these symptoms when they arise in him and try to give his forces a positive and creative outlet before they turn rancid and seep through his being, secretly flooding it with destructive thoughts and feelings. The further one rises up a mountain, the more the atmosphere is rarefied and pure; and the nearer one approaches the peak, the more the perspective becomes vast and imposing. Similarly, there are different levels of consciousness in the Universe, from the highest to the lowest. In the higher mysterious spheres, the Devas (sublime gods) reign, reflecting their divine splendor all around in the form of spiritual light, exalted sentiments, and inspiring artistic accomplishments; while the inferior regions are inhabited by the Asuras (demonic gods), spreading dark influences everywhere. And the human being carries these two extremes hidden in him. If he does not consciously struggle to rise to the superior levels of himself, then the lower aspects of his nature will inevitably dominate and use him without his perceiving it, fruitlessly sapping his vitality. A wise and heedful aspirant will carefully watch over and protect his forces from being stealthily drawn away from him, wasted in negative emotions, futile imaginings, and unprofitable activities. He knows that he needs every drop of his energy for his spiritual struggles, and that economizing that energy is essential for him. However, if, on certain occasions, the aspirant finds himself in a disturbed, restless, or depressed mood, and for some reason or other he is unable to muster the strength to disengage himself from it, then, before this state gathers too much momentum in a downward movement and increases its hold on him, it is better that he leave his room and take up another form of spiritual practice while walking outside—a form of spiritual practice that he should, in any case, always do whenever he happens to be out of doors. Not only will this way of walking use his energies productively on days when his inner state is too difficult to control, but it will also open new avenues for him toward deeper spiritual insights and self-knowledge. The difficulties he will have to cope with in this exercise will help him see better the imperative need to remain in a state of intense self-recollectedness in action also, and not only when quietly meditating behind the walls of a monastery or in his room. Failing this, all his spiritual achievements, no matter how lofty they may be, will not have been put to the test in active life, and he cannot know how he will react or stand up to the unpredictable and fierce winds of the outside world when destiny unexpectedly flings him in their midst. For, even though he may be able to withdraw from outer life for a certain time, sooner or later he will be made to leave the protection of his seclusion and share with an agonizing humanity the fruits of his spiritual harvest—which must not, by divine law, be kept for him alone. This important new exercise mentioned above consists in concentrating all one’s attention on the soles of the feet while walking in the street. Generally, when someone is out walking, he is never present and aware of himself in the manner in which he really should be. He moves about in a state of mental absence, lost in a maze of futile imaginings. So that an aspirant might begin to understand the sense of his existence, and what is required of him by the supreme universal Mind that gave him his breath of life and intelligence, it is at first necessary for him to understand this dramatic problem of the strange state of oblivion in which he passes his life. And he needs every possible bit of help for that. He will be greatly assisted in his efforts at remaining present to himself in this exercise by feeling the soles of his feet each time they touch the ground. In this particular work, concentration on the extremities of the legs will show the aspirant the paramount need there is for him to get away from his head and his habitual thinking so as to permit a new sort of consciousness to arise in him and occupy the place of his ordinary mind. If his lower self does not remove itself—to some degree at least—to make way for something more worthy in him, then this luminous consciousness that he unknowingly carries in the depths of himself cannot come to the foreground of his being sufficiently to make its presence felt. It will be expedient for the aspirant not to venture upon such a difficult and unusual battle without some inner preparations first—otherwise he will either forget to do it most of the time, or he will not have gathered in him the necessary strength and determination to maintain such a delicate struggle. His efforts will consequently be lukewarm and not enough to bring him any positive results. Each time he is thinking of going out, he should inwardly prepare himself, even though it be for only thirty seconds. And, before starting to do this, or any other, spiritual exercise, the aspirant should always first try to feel what is at stake for him at such moments. Instead of letting his mind wander aimlessly in vain reveries, he must make it a habit always to occupy his attention in this important work with the utmost of his sincerity. He should tenaciously continue this particular exercise until he is able, at will, to remain connected inwardly to his higher Source throughout all his outer life activities, until there comes a day when this temporary support will no longer be necessary, or he may need to come back to it only in times of inner difficulty. This special work should not be given up because of the strong resistance the aspirant will encounter in himself at first. As he will notice, the slightest unexpected movement or sound can suddenly distract him from his aim: it may be a passer-by who accidentally jostles him, a fly insisting on settling on his face, or the loud bark of a dog—but, whatever it is, before he realizes what has happened, he is no longer “present”! In the beginning of his struggles to stay present, the seeker will discover that hardly has he taken a few steps than, abruptly, and in an unaccountable manner, he becomes absent and dispersed again, completely forgetting about this important spiritual work and his intention to remain concentrated. Two, or even five, minutes later or longer, he will be just as surprised when, suddenly, as in a flash, there is a strange, inexplicable and very rapid inward movement that takes place in him—the significance of which he may not appreciate nor understand at first—and he has come back to an awareness of himself again! At that very instant, he will realize that, not only had he altogether forgotten about this exercise, but that—what is even more curious—in an incomprehensible way, the knowledge and feeling of his existence had been strangely obliterated at the same time. He was mysteriously swallowed up and—so to speak—“died” in this state of self-forgetfulness! The aspirant must take particular care not to become irritated and intolerant with himself each time he loses the thread of his attention in this manner. He should patiently and persistently begin again with even greater determination, fixing his attention on, and feeling, the soles of his feet as they come down and touch the ground. Through this way of working, he will, among other things, also start to know himself as he is. He will suddenly notice all his hidden, changing, and contradictory sentiments, his unconscious inclinations to criticize, his desires, tensions, restlessness, and many other things that he otherwise could not have known. If the aspirant finds it too difficult to maintain a state of self-recollectedness during this exercise, then he should try aiming from one tree to another (without necessarily looking at them), using the distance that separates them as an additional support while keeping his attention fixed on the soles of his feet. If there are no trees about, then any other object will do. When reaching this landmark, he must immediately aim at another. But he should gradually increase the distance between them every day until he can finally drop this additional prop altogether. It is this mysterious movement toward oneself that the seeker must arrive at clearly perceiving and understanding. However, this comprehension should not come from his intellect but through his feeling and intuition. He will not fail to observe afterward—that is to say, when he recovers the awareness of himself—how, every time this state of self-oblivion descends upon and engulfs him, it is characterized by his being once more lost and identified with the ordinary aspect of his nature made up of endless fantasies, ambitions, frustrations, worries, and impracticable hopes, all of which, like a kaleidoscope, constantly change and replace one another moment by moment. In contrast, every time this sudden inward movement takes place in him, he experiences for a short instant another state of consciousness that does not last long—an unusual, uninvolved state of consciousness that he may miss, or not clearly see in the beginning. This inward movement is so narrow at first, and it happens so quickly, that he may not realize its profound meaning and importance without an enlightened teacher to point it out and expound it to him. Nevertheless, as the aspirant keeps losing and regaining this special awareness of himself, he will, little by little, come to see and understand more and better this strange phenomenon of his “disappearance and reappearance.” He will begin intuitively to perceive particularly what it was he was lost in the moment before, and to what other state of being he is recalled. He will eventually come to realize that each time this strange and inexplicable movement toward himself takes place it is like a rebirth, and whenever there is the contrary movement, going outward and “away” from himself, it is like a death. He will start to discover how he “dies” in his habitual state of oblivion at every instant of his life without seeing it. When later, after long practice, he is able to remain aware of himself for longer periods, he will then begin to live, see, and hear differently. From this impersonal higher aspect of his being, he will begin—in little flashes at first—to see things as they truly are. He will penetrate the feelings of other beings and read mysterious messages in trees, in mountains, and in all other things his eyes happen to settle upon. A human being can live more fully only insofar as he is capable of being present and connected to his Supreme Source—this mysterious, silent, uninvolved Spectator in him. Strength grows when utilized wisely and constructively. As one puts it into use, it will increase and reward its owner with yet more strength—just as when a farmer makes the initial efforts to plow his field and sow some grains of wheat, and it enigmatically brings forth a far greater harvest than was originally planted. If the aspirant can arrive at finding in himself the necessary force to start making the preliminary efforts of remaining present to himself, and begin to live through the higher levels of his consciousness, he will then muster in himself yet more energy to make further efforts and rise to still higher planes of being. In that way, he will, by his own strivings, aid his spiritual growth and transformation—for no one else can make these efforts on his behalf and work for his redemption, just as nobody can take vitality and profit from the food that is eaten and digested by another person. Strength produces more strength when put to use. By working tenaciously for his own enlightenment and salvation, the seeker will find his inner power of concentration and capacity for attention expanding. And this will develop in him intuition, insight, and intelligence of a superior order, which, when put into action, will continue mysteriously to germinate and augment and give birth to further wisdom on a still higher plane. The more one does, the more one will be capable of doing; and the less one does, the less one will be able to do. If, through his perseverance and ardent efforts, the seeker finally attains some degree of enlightenment and realizes the nature of his True Being, then, whenever moments of self-forgetfulness occur and he suddenly “comes back” to himself again (remembering, that is, to turn his look inward to the presence in him of this enigmatic, impartial, and silent “Spectator”), he will invariably find that this mysterious and luminous aspect of his consciousness is always there, ever-glowing and lighting up his being with its effulgence. In fact, it has been there unceasingly and has never at any time abandoned him. If, on certain occasions, he may have thought it was absent, it is only because he himself had turned his gaze away from it, and had forgotten it. After some time the aspirant will be surprised to find on looking back that, paradoxically, even these periods of “forgetfulness” had their place and meaning in the scheme of things to help him rise to the higher planes of his being. For he will not have failed to notice that (apart from the outer problems and pains this self-forgetfulness brings with it), each time he loses the awareness of his existence, and his attention and interest are once more drawn away from him to be wasted in fruitless reveries and activities, he suffers from a terrible emptiness and solitude in the depths of his soul. He will then begin to see clearly that the only moments he is truly conscious of existing, and has a feeling of the fullness of himself, are the moments when his look is once more turned inward toward the light of his higher nature. Afterward, he will find that, whenever he sinks again into his habitual state of oblivion, it will not be a state of such total forgetfulness as before—because, during such moments, he will experience a curious and unaccountable feeling of being ill at ease. If he is sensitive enough to recognize this condition in himself quickly, he can then turn this strange and uncomfortable feeling into yet another means or reminder to disentangle himself from whatever had so uselessly absorbed him, and to turn back forthwith to the awareness of his higher being and true life, dwelling wakefully in the peace of his celestial inner abode.
  12. 2 points
    Kalpu

    Simran help needed!

    Waheguru Piyaron! I am not a Sikh ... I am Hindu but from 4 5 years i am believing in Ik Onkar and my life is going much easy! From last year i have started doing simran in the evening.. First i do Mala of Mol mantar.. And then Path Of Shiri Jap Ji Sahib.. I continued this few months then i added Choupai Sahib.. then now i have added Rehras Sahib too.. Suggest me how i can be still better? I also do two mala of Dhan Guru Nanak Chanting.. And sometimes i get alot heart in simran that i got in rhythm.. Also at some times i feel so distracted that my Eager is asking me to stop and get up still i dont get up i fight with my ego! And continues.. I am not stil able to do Amrit vaila.. So suggest me what i can to make my evening prayer even more Peacefull and conected to my Lord !
  13. 2 points
    ਦੋਹਰਾ ॥ Dohira ਸਹਰ ਇਟਾਵਾ ਮੈ ਹੁਤੋ ਨਾਨਾ ਨਾਮ ਸੁਨਾਰ ॥ In the city of Etawa, there lived a goldsmith, ਤਾ ਕੀ ਅਤਿ ਹੀ ਦੇਹ ਮੈ ਦੀਨੋ ਰੂਪ ਮੁਰਾਰ ॥੧॥ Who had been endowed with most handsome body.(1) ਚੌਪਈ ॥ Chaupaee ਜੋ ਤ੍ਰਿਯ ਤਾ ਕੋ ਨੈਨ ਨਿਹਾਰੈ ॥ ਆਪੁਨ ਕੋ ਕਰਿ ਧੰਨ੍ਯ ਬਿਚਾਰੈ ॥ Any woman, who attained, even, a glimpse of him, would consider herself to be blissful. ਯਾ ਕੈ ਰੂਪ ਤੁਲਿ ਕੋਊ ਨਾਹੀ ॥ ਯੌ ਕਹਿ ਕੈ ਅਬਲਾ ਬਲਿ ਜਾਹੀ ॥੨॥ ‘There is none like you,’ they would say and be prepared to die for him.(2) ਦੋਹਰਾ ॥ Dohira ਦੀਪ ਕਲਾ ਨਾਮਾ ਹੁਤੀ ਦੁਹਿਤਾ ਰਾਜ ਕੁਮਾਰਿ ॥ There used to live a princess named Deepkala. ਅਮਿਤ ਦਰਬੁ ਤਾ ਕੇ ਰਹੈ ਦਾਸੀ ਰਹੈ ਹਜਾਰ ॥੩॥ She was very affluent and had many maids to attend her.(3) ਪਠੈ ਏਕ ਤਿਨ ਸਹਚਰੀ ਲਯੋ ਸੁਨਾਰ ਬੁਲਾਇ ॥ She sent one of her maids and called over the goldsmith. ਰੈਨਿ ਦਿਨਾ ਤਾ ਸੋ ਰਮੈ ਅਧਿਕ ਚਿਤ ਸੁਖੁ ਪਾਇ ॥੪॥ She ravished with him and felt blissful.(4) ਚੌਪਈ ॥ Chaupaee ਰਾਤ ਦਿਵਸ ਤਿਹ ਧਾਮ ਬੁਲਾਵੈ ॥ ਕਾਮ ਕੇਲ ਤਿਹ ਸੰਗ ਕਮਾਵੈ ॥ Every night and day, she would invite him to her house and ਪ੍ਰੀਤਿ ਮਾਨਿ ਤਿਹ ਸਾਥ ਬਿਹਾਰੈ ॥ ਵਾ ਕੇ ਲਿਯੇ ਪ੍ਰਾਨ ਦੈ ਡਾਰੈ ॥੫॥ With him enjoyed by making love.(5) ਏਕ ਦਿਵਸ ਤਿਹ ਧਾਮ ਬੁਲਾਯੋ ॥ ਤਬ ਲੋ ਪਿਤੁ ਤਾ ਕੇ ਗ੍ਰਿਹ ਆਯੋ ॥ One day when he was at her house, her father came to her quarters. ਕਛੂ ਨ ਚਲਿਯੋ ਜਤਨ ਇਹ ਕੀਨੋ ॥ ਅੰਜਨ ਆਂਜਿ ਬਿਦਾ ਕਰਿ ਦੀਨੋ ॥੬॥ She could think no excuse, put eye-lasher in his eyes (disguised him as woman) and let him go.(6) ਦੋਹਰਾ ॥ Dohira ਅਧਿਕ ਮੂੜ ਤਾ ਕੋ ਪਿਤਾ ਸਕਿਯੋ ਭੇਦ ਨਹਿ ਚੀਨ ॥ Unduly foolish father could not discern the secret, ਆਖਨ ਅੰਜਨ ਆਂਜਿ ਤ੍ਰਿਯ ਮੀਤ ਬਿਦਾ ਕਰਿ ਦੀਨ ॥੭॥ And the woman putting eye-lasher bid good-bye to her lover.(7)(1) ਇਤਿ ਸ੍ਰੀ ਚਰਿਤ੍ਰ ਪਖ੍ਯਾਨੇ ਤ੍ਰਿਯਾ ਚਰਿਤ੍ਰੇ ਮੰਤ੍ਰੀ ਭੂਪ ਸੰਬਾਦੇ ਨਬਵੇ ਚਰਿਤ੍ਰ ਸਮਾਪਤਮ ਸਤੁ ਸੁਭਮ ਸਤੁ ॥੯੦॥੧੫੬੯॥ਅਫਜੂੰ॥ Ninetieth Parable of Auspicious Chritars Conversation of the Raja and the Minister, Completed with Benediction. (90)(1567)
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Sat1176

    Attention & Self-Surrender

    Attention Every living creature—even a simple cell, however infinitesimal it may be—is conscious of its own life and apprehensive of death. From the moment that living beings—whether humans, animals, or corpuscles (i.e. minute body or cell in an organism) invisible to our senses—acquired a fragile body, continually menaced by all sorts of predators, by natural disasters, and by death, the necessity to protect it has engendered within them the elusive faculty of attention—which varies for every species, according to its degree of evolution, its intelligence, and its level of being. As, from their birth, living beings are obliged to struggle by all possible means to assure their subsistence and protect themselves from all that puts their physical existence in peril, they are, despite themselves, constrained to exert their attention without respite (i.e. without a short period of rest from something difficult or unpleasant) so as not to lose what has become most precious to them: their carnal envelope. For, as soon as a certain perception of their existence awakens within them, their corporeal form transforms into an indispensable instrument, by way of which alone they can feel themselves and be conscious of their existence in this world. Paradoxically, all these dangers that ceaselessly menace their survival not only encourage them to appreciate their incarnate existence, but also play a preponderant role in the development of their attention and in the growth of their intelligence. It is necessary—especially for a seeker already engaged on a spiritual path—to understand and accept the fact that, contrary to what one habitually thinks, without these external dangers that constantly menace human beings’ lives, without the unexpected problems that they must perpetually resolve, and without the physical and emotional suffering linked to such an uncertain and precarious earthly existence, they would sleep within themselves forever; there would be no way of persuading them to make the effort to awaken in order to discover within themselves another universe, beyond time and space, which alone can give meaning to their life. It is only with the development of attention that human beings’ intelligence grows. Their attention constitutes the third part of a trinity within them; it is situated between the Superior and Celestial Aspect of their nature, and the inferior and ordinary aspect of themselves. * * * Without the aspirant realizing it, his attention is the most precious weapon and the most precious treasure he possesses. When he allows his attention to be attracted and held by something, whatever it may be, without him being conscious of it, he places that thing between the Sublime and himself. And, as time passes, he finally becomes too identified with and attached to what holds his attention—whether that be an object of pleasure or a human being—which thus forms a screen between the Sacred and himself, blinds him, and does not allow the Divine Light to reach and illuminate his being. It proves vital for a seeker who has just set himself to meditation or Yoga practice, to be on his guard from the beginning, in order to clearly see that, whatever the object his attention gravitates towards, it is there that he will indubitably find himself. Every thought that occupies his mind, consciously or unconsciously, is only nurtured and maintained within him by his attention. It is his attention that gives it life. If he does not consent to give it his attention, this thought cannot continue to exist within him; it dies through lack of nourishment. Habitually, human beings do not realize to what extent nor in what way their attention constitutes a sort of combustible substance, because it is only through their attention that their thoughts and imaginings can find the force to manifest themselves and subsist within them. Without them being conscious of it, their attention acts as the indispensable combustible material through which their minds can dream and wander where they like—just like the oil in a lamp, which feeds and keeps alive the flame of the wick. Now, the Divine Aspect of human beings also has need of this combustible substance, of their attention, to be able to reveal Itself in their beings and manifest Itself within them. It is the precious gem of their attention that human beings use to set in motion their pointless inner chatter (which imprisons them within themselves and renders their lives sterile), their physical or other desires (which they want, most often, to satisfy without worrying about the consequences), as well as their incessant dreams of permanent earthly happiness (impossible to attain in this form of existence, which is so changeable and full of unexpected events). Without attention, no thought, no fantasy, no covetousness can take life within them. If the aspirant succeeds in awakening, even if only a little, in order to be sufficiently distant from himself, so that he can see what his attention is wasted upon most of the time and what kinds of useless and worthless thoughts or fantasies he is constantly nurturing and keeping alive within him through the precious tool of his attention, he cannot but be horrified! Human beings do not realize that at every moment they are forging themselves into what they are and what they will become, through the kinds of thoughts they allow themselves to feed with the precious treasure of their attention. They do not see the extent to which, unbeknownst to them, they are ceaselessly manipulated by their minds. Human beings are, in a way, comparable to land that one wants to make fertile. To start with, the weeds must be eradicated, the soil turned so that it can breathe, then fertilizer needs to be added; after that, the seeds have to be planted and every young seedling cared for daily so that it can become a tree bearing a great quantity of fruit that will, in the end, contribute to feeding a multitude. The seeker must also consent to go through fairly similar stages: first he must clear his mind, through conscious efforts, then he must sow, in the field of his being, all that is positive and noble so that he can be transformed into a fine instrument that is useful to his Creator and to his fellows. And it is precisely here that his attention plays such an important role in the transformation of himself and his tendencies. In addition, a plant needs light to survive. It is also necessary to water it regularly to assure its healthy growth. In the same way, the superior aspirations of human beings need to be continually fed by the spiritual light provided by reading sacred texts and spending time with men and women who are more evolved than they are. These aspirations also need to be fed every day by attention, so as to assure not only their survival, but also their development within human beings, because if these superior aspirations are not restimulated and maintained day after day, it will be human beings’ ordinary thoughts that will gain the upper hand and inhabit them to their cost. Thus they will live only a banal and vegetative existence. Their sojourn on this Earth will unfold only in the perpetual concern with preserving their physical envelopes and gratifying their various needs. The aspirant must understand that unless he makes conscious and tenacious efforts to awaken to another world within him, a world that belongs to another dimension, beyond time and space, he is programmed by Great Nature to be nothing but an instrument of reproduction, animated by an irrepressible sexual desire in order to serve its design, which is the perpetuation of the species. The sort of attention that human beings generally possess is sufficient for the protection and maintenance of their planetary bodies. However, it is far from being what is necessary for a spiritual quest, which demands a different sort of attention, entirely unknown ordinarily—such a subtle, alert, and vivid attention that it alone can allow the seeker to approach true meditation practice as well as true spiritual work in his daily life. * * * There is a particular link between attention and thoughts. As previously mentioned, it is attention that, without them being conscious of it, works in human beings like combustible material and, thus, animates and perpetuates thoughts within them. And they vibrate within themselves according to the sorts of thoughts that habitually unfold in their minds. Furthermore, they cannot avoid drawing to them the particular conditions corresponding to the way they think and vibrate within themselves. In their ordinary, passive state of being, they do not see that it is their minds that use them and not they who use their minds. It is here that lies the cause of all the misunderstandings and the dissension in the world, because the judgments people habitually make are solely based on what gives satisfaction to their desires and their ambitions and depend on what they believe to be good or bad. They are not capable of reflecting objectively nor of creating sufficient silence within themselves to be able to respond to the call of something more elevated in their being so that a change in their way of thinking and being might occur within them. An unenlightened person wishes for the world and all that surrounds him to conform to what he wants and does not want, as well as what he thinks is good or bad. Another does not agree with him, as he also desires everything to correspond to what he does and does not like and the way he thinks things should be. A third is outraged by what the other two want, for he also has his own ideas about the way everything should work. And so wars break out with all the destruction and suffering they bring in their wake. This phenomenon, alas, is even found in the various religions of the world. Because they are cut off from their Divine Source, human beings do not see that they are only thinking and acting through their ordinary aspect. Everyone has his or her own opinions about the way things should be and wants to impose his or her beliefs on others, by force if necessary. It is important for someone who has just set out on this spiritual journey in a country that is, as yet, unknown to him, to realize, with all of himself, that every tenacious thought, every fantasy (sexual or otherwise) and all inner chatter can only arise in his mind and continue to live within him through the invisible combustible element of his attention, which he consents to give to them. Without him usually being conscious of it, the priceless gem of his attention is, most of the time, wasted in feeding all his thoughts, all his fantasies, and all his inner chatter (most often harmful to himself as well as others), thus allowing them to occupy the hearth of his being—and always at his expense. As long as human beings use their attention to nurture and keep alive all that unfolds in their minds—without discrimination between what is useful and constitutes an aid to their spiritual evolution and what proves unfavorable and is a hindrance to that evolution—and as long as they continue, blindly or through weakness, to allow these spectral entities to take root in their beings, these entities will always remain masters of their inner dwelling, taking the place that should be occupied within them by their Supreme Self. In discovering the dark aspect of his inferior nature, instead of being discouraged or even demoralized, a motivated seeker can use all of his negative thoughts, every feeling of ill-will, and every harmful tendency he discerns in himself—on condition that he regards them without identifying or being emotionally involved with them—as so many means to awaken and turn towards another world within himself, where reigns the unchanging silence of his Celestial Being—just as a bird uses the very resistance of the air as a support to rise aloft. In this way, a mysterious and invisible alchemy may begin to operate in the aspirant, to transform the “crude metal” of his ordinary self into sparkling “Gold.” All his unfavorable penchants and habits—which not only have crystallized within him since he arrived on this Earth, but have also plunged their roots into a time that is so mysteriously distant—must inevitably go through the furnace of ardent work on himself to be sublimated and transformed into traits of inner beauty, so that he becomes worthy of bringing to others the Divine Light and spiritual knowledge he will have acquired after so many years of hard and tenacious efforts. It will then be possible for him to have a glimpse of the real meaning of the word “love”—a word that springs so often from people’s mouths, but whose true sense is so misunderstood, the sentiment itself being so rarely felt. This word “love,” which turns up continually in everyday language, is, alas, even used to express tastes or opinions on things that are entirely banal and unimportant! Ordinarily, one does not see that, generally, one speaks without being conscious of oneself or of what one is saying. The speed with which most people verbally express their thoughts—often without reflecting upon the true meaning of their words or the effect they have on others—does not allow them to see that they are only repeating formulae or phrases acquired mechanically from childhood, which have become habits within them that they practically never question. People do not realize that the word “love”—which is commonly uttered so easily, without concern for the use made of it or what one is associating it with—also signifies attention and compassion, because compassion cannot be dissociated from love. Again, one cannot but remark the extent to which attention proves to be a vital element in a seeker’s work and that it intervenes in all domains, including that of love. If human beings were sufficiently conscious of themselves—that is to say conscious in a way that is not habitual to them—and masters of their attention, they could no longer speak or act as they do ordinarily. Indeed, what one generally calls “love” is, most often, only the expression of the desire to gratify pressing physical needs or to satisfy one’s personal ambitions and interests of the moment. Moreover, human beings are, most of the time, so imprisoned within themselves and so identified with their daily worries that they practically never consider the problems or needs of others in a right way. Sometimes it takes very little for what one calls love to transform into indifference, if not hate. As long as human beings remain cut off from their Divine Source and as long as they do not know, through direct experience, the Divine within themselves, they, most often, only unconsciously obey an instinct of preservation that arises in their profane selves and drives them to live only for themselves and for the various goods they want to obtain from the great external world, in order to meet the pressing demands of their little inner worlds. As they ordinarily are, they are far too identified with what is happening most of the time in their minds, with their daily problems, and with their various physical needs to succeed in being sufficiently distant from themselves in order to begin to know themselves. Because of their conditioning, they spend their terrestrial existence with a sort of stranger within them or, one could even say, with an invisible entity that has taken possession of their beings, which inhabits them and manipulates them as it will, according to its desires of the moment. Furthermore, as their habits—whether they are good or bad—ceaselessly grow and become crystallized within them as they age, all that they see or hear around them sets in motion a mechanism that, without them being conscious of it, automatically sets off within them associations of ideas and corresponding emotions that succeed one another with great rapidity, just like in their nocturnal dreams. In all these mental processes, it is their attention that, without them perceiving it, is taken from them and used, most often, futilely. Unless they have the chance to meet someone who helps them to awaken, they will continue to remain at the mercy of this stranger within them—with which they are so identified, to the point of taking it to be themselves. This invisible aspect of their personalities keeps them in its grip and uses them for the gratification of its various ambitions and its physical appetites, which not only all constitute obstacles to their spiritual fulfillment, but also ceaselessly cause problems for their fellows as well as all other living creatures who have the misfortune to share this planet with them. Without them ever being conscious of it, the thoughts of human beings continually twist and turn and change direction endlessly within their minds, like clouds in the sky, at the will of the wind. Furthermore, like sleepers who—unless they are awoken—do not know that they sleep, they also do not realize that they are hardly ever conscious of themselves in the way they need to be in order to be able to realize what is happening within them. Sometimes, it takes so little for the thing they like at a given moment to lose all interest for them, especially if they no longer need it. On the other hand, tomorrow, they may like the very thing they do not like today, if they should discover that it can be useful to them after all. This also applies to the love a man bears a woman and vice-versa. True, disinterested, and compassionate love seems unknown to most of the human beings inhabiting this Earth. As and when the aspirant advances spiritually and his inner eyes open, he will no longer consider the outside world in the same way. Moreover, he will no longer be able to obey the blind impulses within him in the same way. He will no longer want to act for the satisfaction of his ordinary personal interests, but to respond to something elusive that belongs to another Universe within him, incomprehensible to the people of this world. He will then feel the imperative necessity to change his way of thinking, being, and behaving in everyday life, in order to be ever more honorable and true inside, to become worthy of being admitted into a Holy Place within himself and dwelling there. What one habitually calls “love” will take on a completely different meaning for him. He will begin to find himself in what can only be called a state of love that is beyond him—a compassionate and indescribable state of love that will rise from the depths of his being and cannot fail to touch the people who come into contact with him. As previously mentioned, one cannot dissociate love from compassion and attention. Thus, the aspirant will be ever more attentive and sensitive to the suffering and needs of others, in an entirely particular way that one cannot ordinarily know. He will feel their pain and their emotional distress with inhabitual compassion. This state of love in which he will so mysteriously find himself, as the result of his long years of spiritual practice, will always remain an enigma for him. He will be unable to describe or understand how it manifests itself within him. All he will know is that, suddenly, this state inhabits and illuminates his being. He will always be seized by wonder before its presence within him. This special love will radiate from him, independently of his will, to bring a little light and consolation to others in the painful moments of their lives—just as light emanates naturally from the sun. * * * It is always their attention that is involved in what is happening within human beings as well as in all that they do in the external world—whether for good or ill. It is only through their extremely developed attention that great composers can create musical works so prodigious that they elevate listeners to another plane of being, thus allowing them to experience entirely inhabitual sentiments which it is impossible for them to feel otherwise—sublime sentiments that belong to another elusive universe, inhabited by “Devas” (gods) and their “Gandharvas” (celestial musicians). Furthermore, this music, composed by geniuses with the help of their attention, will, subsequently, year after year, for centuries even, put to work the attention of all the members of symphony orchestras, without them being conscious of what is happening within them. Thus, one can say that through their attention and their great capacity for concentration, composers become, despite themselves, spiritual masters of sorts for all the performers in an orchestra, for the conductor, for the soloists, and even, to some extent, for the listeners too. Is it possible to imagine the many years of hard work on attention and concentration necessary for a pianist to one day be able to rise to the challenge presented by performing, from memory, before an extremely critical audience, a concerto by Beethoven or Brahms, which contains thousands of notes, changes in harmony, modulations, and complicated rhythms? Is it possible to imagine what a great singer needs by way of long tenacious practice of attention and concentration before being able to sing by heart, before an extremely severe public, an opera by Puccini, such as Madame Butterfly or Turandot? One might then, perhaps, understand how much more concentration and, above all, division of attention is demanded of a great composer to be able to write a symphonic work that requires such a great number of musicians for its performance and which is like the creation of a marvelous universe in miniature, where so many different things unfold simultaneously. Thus, it can be seen that, in every great artistic realization, it is always attention that plays the preponderant role. Through attention, the positive effect of these works continues, for centuries after the death of their author, to spread across the world in order to help other people in their efforts to master their attention. Moreover, one can only be filled with wonder when one thinks that, even a long time after the death of great geniuses (such as Beethoven, Brahms, César Franck, or Gustav Mahler), their music continues to nurture the sentiments and minds of an incalculable number of men and women, exalting them and bringing a little light into their lives—a light that is not of this world and that can, little by little, open to them an unhoped-for door to another Universe, so subtle, so fine, and so sublime, that they carry deep within their beings without ordinarily knowing it. Furthermore, music of such genius constantly helps humanity in other ways too; is it truly possible to imagine the number of people throughout the world who have been nurtured and financially supported by the very admirable musical creations of a great composer, such as Beethoven, since he departed this planet? All the performers and their families, the conductors, the soloists, without forgetting either all the people working in the concert halls, the music printers, the impresarios, the instrument makers, etc., all of whom have been able to provide for their needs through the attention and labor of a single human being—or perhaps it would be more correct to say of a giant: Beethoven! What immense work must have been produced by this prodigious musician to succeed in leaving behind him such a great quantity of works—despite the terrible handicap of deafness which began quite early in his life and even though he lived only fifty-seven years. Incidentally, to someone who exclaimed that he must live in a world of enchantments where inspiration flowed in abundance and without effort, he responded indignantly: “My music is only one percent inspiration, the rest is ninety-nine percent perspiration!” The people of this world, plunged into the darkness of their spiritual ignorance, cannot understand in what sense an enlightened being or a great artist is sacrificed. He comes to this earth predestined to be sacrificed for the whole of humanity, without them being conscious of it, in order to help them, directly or indirectly, to apprehend the meaning of their existence on this planet. A great musical genius is even sometimes condemned to spend his whole life in poverty, with no other desire within him than to occupy himself with his artistic creations, in order to accomplish an enigmatic destiny that remains forever elusive for the majority of those who people this Earth. Instead of wasting the precious tool of his attention in worthless thoughts and activities, as most men and women do, the musical genius, driven by a mysterious instinct that is beyond the comprehension of the masses, struggles ceaselessly with himself to concentrate all his forces and all his attention with the sole aim of bringing forth his creations. Indeed, it is only through the continual sacrifice of himself, of what he does and does not want ordinarily, and of everything that might bring him the distracting and fleeting pleasures that most people seek, that he succeeds in being sufficiently concentrated and inwardly silent to hear the mysterious voice that murmurs in his ears the inspirations that are so strangely sublime and moving that they will subsequently transport his listeners into the domain of the gods. It is in this way that not only does the whole of humanity benefit from the work and the sacrifice of a great genius, but the genius himself also benefits from it, because throughout his whole life, he exerts his attention—like an aspirant during his meditation practice or his spiritual exercises in active life. It is right that the price to pay should be so high; it could not be otherwise, with regard to the spectacular result for the world when the attention of a human being is employed in such a positive direction. When someone has used the gift of his life in a constructive way, not only does he leave a beneficial trace on Earth after his departure, but he is also an example for humanity, who can thus look at the future with hope, instead of remaining tied to their self-destructive belief in a material happiness that is impossible to make concrete. The wrong that one does also leaves its imprint upon the world. If, in acting to satisfy a personal interest or in not doing his work properly, someone causes suffering to another, that other may be so emotionally disturbed that, without him meaning to, the state in which he finds himself will trouble other people who come into contact with him and, in their turn, they will also be unable to help disturbing those around them. In this way, the problem caused at the beginning will continue to spread across the world. What a seeker does not generally realize is that, if everything he does is executed carefully and with consideration for others, it will not only be others who will benefit from that, but he will benefit too; in effect, this way of acting will, firstly, exercise his attention and, secondly, make all his qualities grow within him. In this way, it is he who will, in the long run, benefit psychically from his efforts. * * * Every action inevitably brings about consequences, good or bad. It is with their attention that wrong is done by human beings in the world and it is also with their attention that good is accomplished. What is more, where their attention is drawn, it is also there that their interest is. Thus, the aspirant can appreciate the inestimable value of his attention and understand the crucial role it plays in his life and in that of others—especially when he uses it consciously in his various spiritual exercises. Attention can be compared to the atmosphere that surrounds the Earth, because of which alone one can see the daylight and the blue of the sky; as one leaves the earth’s atmosphere, one encounters nothing but darkness. It is the same for human beings; without their attention, by way of which alone they can join with the Light of their Celestial Being, they lose themselves ever more in a state of near dark isolation. The incommensurable space of the Cosmos is made up only of eternal darkness, studded here and there with the minuscule points of light which are the stars, and of countless galaxies separated by inconceivably vast distances. The musical genius is, to some extent, comparable to one of these small points of light that tries to shine through the darkness in which humanity is plunged. He is like a solitary beacon in an immense ocean of men and women of all races who, like the waves of the sea, are ceaselessly born and die, without apprehending the true meaning of their existence on this planet. The composer struggles throughout his life to bring forth his artistic creations and, thus, to assume the mysterious role for which he was predestined. His music is like the light of a lamp that illuminates the souls of humans and shows them the path towards a subtle Universe, usually ineffable and indefinable, that they carry within their beings without being conscious of it. * * * An aspirant may benefit from observing a particular technology that can be found in the external world. If he grasps the principle, it could encourage him to become more serious and more motivated in his meditation practice, as well as in his spiritual exercises in active life, and help him to understand better the importance of his attention and the crucial role it plays in what he will become, for better or worse, according to whether he employs it in a positive manner or wastes it uselessly in thoughts and activities that are incompatible with his wish to know the Sublime within him and to accede to another plane of being beyond time and space. When, in a boiler, the flame transforms the water into steam and it is channeled and guided in a determined direction, the strong concentration of this steam becomes a formidable and powerful energy that can, then, set in motion enormous engines working for the good of all. Thus, it is through the intense concentration of steam that a locomotive can not only travel at high speed, but also draw a large number of very heavy cars, filled with merchandise of considerable weight. It is the same for the seeker. When his attention has passed through the fire of long and intense meditation practice and when he has finally mastered and channeled it towards a definite aim, then—just like the strong concentration of steam within a boiler becomes a force capable of moving a colossal machine—he will be able to transmute his unfavorable tendencies into positive and creative energies. Unsuspected forces will begin to awaken within him, making him capable of executing all that will be required of him very scrupulously and, even, with a perfection that is not within reach of someone ordinary, because all the tasks he will undertake will then be carried out by another aspect of his nature, which, hitherto, remained in a latent state. He may even discover that he is capable of realizations in various artistic domains with a talent that will astonish those who know him. Furthermore, the intensity of his sentiment will become a source of inspiration for the people who come into contact with him, continually encouraging them to become more motivated in their spiritual practice. A particular force that will emanate from his being will constantly touch aspirants who have come to seek from him the necessary help towards their own emancipation, because he will always want to act in their interest when they have need of him, despite the adverse circumstances he may find himself in. Thus, a serious seeker cannot avoid being profoundly troubled when, through intense and sustained meditation practice, he comes to awaken a little and distance himself from himself sufficiently to be able to note that, without him ordinarily being conscious of it, it is always his attention that is involved in all he thinks, says, and does, whether for good or ill, and it is also his attention that plays a determining role in his evolution or his involution. The way he uses the gift of his attention, as well as the goal he uses it for, will indisputably make of him what he is and what he will become. The moral integrity of human beings as well as their sincerity of spirit cannot subsist within them without being fed by the tool of their attention, just as evil cannot continue to exist within them either without being nourished by that precious combustible substance that is their attention. When attention is channeled in a determined direction, it becomes a phenomenal force, a force that, in the same way that it animates great painters or great composers in their artistic creations, proves indispensable to the seeker in his attempts to know the mysterious Source whence he emerged and in which he will be reabsorbed at the end of his temporary passage on this planet. It is only through the continual renouncement of himself and what he wants and does not want ordinarily (as the geniuses mentioned previously do) that the aspirant can come to master his attention in order to be able to hear within himself the voice of his Celestial Being which is trying to guide him on the path of his hope—a path that is sown with traps of all sorts that are difficult to recognize without the help of someone who has already gone through this kind of trial. * * * In addition to all that has previously been said about attention, there remains a fundamentally important point that a serious seeker must take into consideration and try to understand. It is the crucial question of his interest, because one cannot dissociate human beings’ attention from their interest. When someone is very interested in something, whether that be any sort of object or activity, his attention is inevitably used to feed that interest; effectively, what kindles his interest cannot but capture his attention. Thus, just like a great painter or a musical genius who is profoundly passionate and absorbed in his artistic creations, the aspirant must also come to be so intensely interested and occupied by his quest that it becomes a question of life or death for him. His spiritual practice—meditation and exercises undertaken in active life—must take first place in his existence. Nothing else must count for him. In addition, he must ceaselessly take care that his efforts and his interest do not weaken and lose their initial force, which will inevitably happen if he allows himself to be distracted by the futilities of the external world. This primordial quest must always remain the essential reason for his presence on this planet because, at the hour of his death—an inescapable moment that awaits all living beings without exception—a burning question will arise within him: “Does all I have thought and done, from the day I was born into this world, until this fatal moment, justify the enigmatic gifts of my mind, my attention, and my life?”
  16. 2 points
    dalsingh101

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Happy Vasaikhi everyone!
  17. 2 points
    Soulfinder

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Best wishes to everyone !!!!
  18. 2 points
    mahanpaapi

    Ram Navami, April 13.

    Ram Navami, April 13.
  19. 2 points
    I have been reading about the Koh i Noor over the last few days. There is little information on who actually attacked Nadir's army. Nadir's army had so much loot that they took from Delhi. This is the actual page from the book: The reference to bare bottomed peasants I think is refering to the Sikhs who wore cholas and no pyjamas. I think the reference is to the lower half of their body not being covered. http://ignca.gov.in/Asi_data/21254.pdf In the above PDF go to page 17 and read on. There are only about 3 or 4 pages to read. It is a PDF of a translation of the original Persian written by a Kashmiri man who accompanied Nadir on his return from Delhi. He also does not name the Sikhs as such but just calls them the "inhabitants" of that country. It's very interesting to read how those "inhabitants" actually looted nadir's army on the Chenab. Also it states that Zakaria Khan was with Nadir at the time of his return through Panjab, which has been recorded by Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu in the famous conversation between the two which is often quoted by the Sikhs.
  20. 2 points
    Dhan Sri Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji Maharaj, April 10.
  21. 2 points
    This gives us a clue (from Sikhs of the 18th Century by Surjit Singh Gandhi): Dig it out and have a look if there is any info about this topic.
  22. 2 points
    Nadir took 3 groups of people with him to Persia. The first group was the skilled workers, the artisans/craftsmen who had built, but by this time, largely maintained the Moghal buildings. The 2nd group was the women who he had married (perhaps forcibly) to his soldiers. I'm guessing these would include both hindu and muslim. The 3rd group was the people who had been captured to be slaves. Only from this group were some released. I'm not sure why Zakaria asked for the release of some captives. I think that either they were Muslims or that they may have belonged to some class or had some skills that Zakaria needed. It could just have been out of pity as well. It's certainly interesting though.
  23. 2 points
    That was awesome.I'm gonna watch more of this guy.
  24. 2 points
    I love this raw type of stand up comedy. Not for the easily offended! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOtdqUs54ic
  25. 2 points
    This one is really eye opening too. I like the fearless way he has dissected US/European history. I saw the complete shyte hole the former soviet union had become in the cold war on tv. Goray would gloat at it. It was a dire, bombed out place with starving people having to form massive queues for simple basic food. The way Putin has put the place back on the map is an example for us all on a raj-niti tip. Yeah, I know he's probably had to deal with all manner of 'strong-arm' people and do all sorts of dark ish to do it, but he made his country into something out of nothing in front of our eyes. You got to respect that.
  26. 2 points
    You don't see big time leaders talking about religious beliefs in this way. Interesting.
  27. 2 points
    Always liked Putin. Even more once he started bombing the sh*t out of ISIS in Syria.
  28. 2 points
    Dhan Sri Guru Ram Dass Ji Maharaj, April 6.
  29. 2 points
    dalsingh101

    Anger after Paath

    I think quality is better than quantity myself. Do what works for you.
  30. 2 points
    dalsingh101

    Anger after Paath

    This works sehajay sehajay and you make very subtle but significant progress without realising it at the time: Notice that you are more infinitely more attuned with your psychological state now. You are watching it now instead of just reacting to it or acting on it obliviously. Keep doing what works for you. I'm on 20 (sometimes 25) minutes of internalised breathing simran now. This thread helped me up the time. That experience you had might be a significant release of negative emotion from within. You have to stop thinking the simran is anything bad for you (at the very least be neutral about it, if not positive). Could it be that those strong emotions you felt was a revolt of your munh, now that it has twigged on to the fact that you are regularly doing simran to try and limit it's power over you? The mind plays tricks like that on you to try and stay in complete power. Also, when you read Anand Sahib, pay close attention to the instances and of the word munh and how the word is used. You are engaging with your munh now, and you are trying to be munh-jeet (a conqueror of your munh) - but the munh will try and resist this . That might be what you experienced? A desperate attempt by your munh to keep in control.
  31. 2 points
    Jageera

    Anger after Paath

    Another update.Doing minimal simran these days.Just focusing on Japji Sahib and Benti Chaupai. Had about 3 days where I did breathing simran,verbal simran and mental simran alternatively within 1 hour.On the 4th day when I sat down and started simran,within 5 mins I stopped and had this terrible revolting feeling inside.Suddenly felt like as if I was in extreme agony and the Simran was the cause of it and I had to stop it.A lot of anger too like I was angry at myself for doing this simran.Once I stopped and left the room,all was well and good again.From then it is just minimal breathing simran 5-10 mins before reading Japji Sahib. Now sometimes I do 1 slow mala of Mool Mantar.That always works well for me. I did it mentally 1 mala,took me about 50mins to complete.I can always feel the top of my head pulsating or vibrating when I go slow.I seem to like it and will do more of this.I get a feeling of steam released out of my head once I'm done. Will update more if anything new.So far everything seems stagnant and no significant change in mindset and emotions.Maybe I can say I have better control now.
  32. 2 points
    Sat1176

    What is Self?

    You are none of the following: Body Senses Mind Intellect Consciousness Ego - I exist Hmm if your not consciousness even in a pure state then what are you? For that to be discovered then you have to cease to exist.
  33. 2 points
    Glad to share veer ji. I am glad veer ji you spent 30 mins as that is a really long time to watch and listen to a video. Bhai Jugraj Singh Ji did mention a lot of points and its probably the best one made on the subject in detail of the angrej raj as it must have made a lot of people suffer during the time.
  34. 2 points
    Bhai ji, I watched the first 30 minutes of the first video and it was really interesting to note that Bhai Jagraj Singh essentially believed what we are alluding to here in that the movement in part was a compromise to angrej rule. I'm not saying it was all bad, but that reality and how it has affected us must be faced without people getting butt-hurt. Thanks for sharing. I normally don't watch long videos like that.
  35. 2 points
    You know I was reading this old Panjabi A Level book and it was essentially saying that Sanskrit came from Panjab (or the Vedas was written in Panjab), and if the geographical location of the language was used to label it - it would be called old Panjabi. Interesting idea. So what do you think are the main differences (contents wise) between the Markendaya versions and the ones in the Dasam Granth?
  36. 2 points
    Here's a Romanized version of the SaptShati Chandi Paath : http://www.anandamayi.org/ashram/Durga.pdf
  37. 2 points
    Glad to share veer ji. I have found the video tracks where bhai jugraj singh mentions the british raj in a bbc tv debate. Here is a video link with the singh sabha movement mentioned TWGC Topic #10 Part B - Sikhs under the British rule
  38. 2 points
    Veerji I had to google what 'surreptitious' meant but I understand the message you are trying to convey.Do you think it could be possible that in some deep dusty archive somewhere there could be detailed documents of all measures taken against Sikhs and the Sikh faith during the colonial period?I'm very sure that the highly bureaucratic British Government kept meticulous records of all policies made and decisions taken. But even if such documents are found,knowing the ego problem of our "community leaders" worldwide,it will still be sidelined and they would still do whatever they wished or 'felt' is right.
  39. 2 points
    What if what has happened is an actual surreptitious manipulation of the dharam itself, that leads to people thinking that their conception of it, is actually the genuine thing, but in reality, what they are following is a new construct that is a by product of the colonial period. Now when you try and tell them this, or question things, they perceive it as an actual attack on the dharam itself and get very defensive. Like that ole fart in that debate with Bhai Jagraj Singh for example. Or like when you question anything about the Singh Sabha lehar.
  40. 2 points
    Thanks for the vid veerji. I've watched another one of Bhai Jagraj Singh on youtube,it was like some debate going on regarding colonialism and on the other side you could clearly see a "Kala Engrej" in it's full glory supporting his colonial masters. I'm all for free speech but at the same time we should free our minds too and remove this mental shackles of servitude.
  41. 2 points
    Veer ji thats really good points you have wrote. Here is a few videos audios i have found on how the british destroyed sikhs by bhai jugraj singh basics of sikh and how purtan rehras sahib was shortned down by Sant Gurbachan Singh Ji
  42. 2 points
    Interesting to see this word used as 'sword' here.
  43. 2 points
    Yes very useful as it motivates us to follow the teachings of the Gurus more closely and get closer to our own culture and traditions as many these days speak english and have deluded themselves that they are 'White'.They walk,talk and behave like Engrejs and are suffering from Internalized Racism that makes them hate people of their own race and they undermine and mock their own people while being extremely loyal to their masters of other races whichever race that might be. Browsing through Sikh history and some old sources have opened my eyes that there is an active agenda to undermine the teachings and Hukams of the Guru especially of Guru Gobind Singh Ji.In his 52 hukams Guruji mentions "Raajniti parhni - Study politics." On Wikipedia this is the translation given "Raajnitee parhnee — Study and learn about governmental policies." Notice the difference? Another one."Sutantar Vicharna. Raaj Kaaj dian kamaan tae doosrae mutaa dia purshaan noo huk nahi daenaa - Rule Independently. In the affairs of government, do not give people of other religions authority or power."On Wikipedia the translation is "Sutantar vicharna. Raaj Kaaj dian kamaan tae doosrae mutaa dia purshaan noo huk nahee daenaa — Maintain independent rule. In the affairs of governing, do not give the power of religious authority to those of other faiths". Again notice the difference in translation?One talks about political power while the Wikipedia version only mentions religious authority. This is yet another reason to read up on old sources to prevent hostile forces who pretend to be benevolent and friendly from pulling wool over our eyes.
  44. 2 points
    Just in case it gets deleted here is a back up of the audio Deh Shiva Bar Mohe MeaningShudh Ucharan - Sant Gur.mp4
  45. 2 points
    thats very true , i used to do Paath of SaptaShati Chandi composed by Rishi Markandey during Navraate prior to being absorbed in Sikhi. Sapstahati Chandi is a detailed description of the whole event. Guru Maharaaj has laid stress on the War(Jangh )part and described in Bir Ras. This description is very unique, in a very high energy flow. There is a reason behind this, Punjab was influenced by the Shakt tradition before getting influenced by the Vaishnav tradition. Even if you look at the names of the different cities or places such as Chandigarh, Ambala, Jallandhar(the rakshas whom the Shakti had slain) . There is influence of this martial Goddess even in regular day to day conversation. For example , some lady gets angry they say ohnu Chandi aa gayi. This also means that opposite to how the Shakti is worshiped in the North as a kind Mother and addressed as Maiya and the worship is done in the Satvic way, Punjab , Bengal, Northeastern states worship the Shakti in Bir Ras.
  46. 2 points
    There is nothing left to say after you read the following post. Experiences of the PHD Level.
  47. 2 points
    This chapter contains some deep knowledge of heading towards Sunn/Shunya. Yoga of the Void It is only when an aspirant tries to control or get away from his thoughts that he will realize what tenacious and formidable opponents he has to deal with. If he forcefully and unintelligently struggles to repress his thoughts, their resistance will grow stronger, greatly frustrating him and rendering his spiritual endeavours impossible. The interminable procession of thoughts that continuously move across the sky of his consciousness, obscuring his inner world like clouds hiding the light of the sun, can be an immense torment for an inexperienced aspirant in the beginning. He will become especially aware of and confronted with this problem when he first decides seriously to practice meditation. His thoughts will then more than ever plague him, and, unless he understands how to deal wisely with these unwanted intruders—like so many impudent flies on a hot and humid summer afternoon—they will not be easily driven away. No matter how hard he may try to get rid of them, they will obstinately keep coming back. There is a special method of meditation that consists of vigilantly watching one’s thoughts as a means of freeing oneself from them, while at the same time taking the utmost care not to become identified and entangled with them. If the seeker can resolutely keep to this path, meditating with patience, love, and profound sincerity, it will ultimately lead him to the princely gate that opens out into infinite inner space—revealing to him his True Identity, his primordial Divine Nature. Having taken his meditation posture, the seeker must first remain very quiet for some moments, deeply relaxing the whole of his body, especially his head and facial muscles. When he feels tranquil enough, he should then close his eyes and turn part of his attention to the movement of his lower abdomen without interfering with its normal breathing rhythm. At the same time, he must watch every thought and image that passes across the screen of his consciousness with the utmost vigilance. He must not let even one thought or image slip by without being fully aware of it. He must, at the same time, take the greatest possible care not to allow himself to be carried away by it and lose himself in it. The exceptional inner presence, sharp attention, and strength of will that this calls forth from an aspirant is at first practically impossible to maintain for more than a few moments. The difficulty of this particular form of meditation is immense in the beginning, because there is no other support for the aspirant in his efforts to free himself from his customary state of being other than the thoughts themselves, which keep coming and going across the sky of his consciousness. However, if he can muster enough inner force to watch the passage of these thoughts and images without becoming identified with and involved in them, he will start to find that each thought that arises in him has a definite beginning, climax, and an end; and hardly has one thought vanished than another has suddenly arisen to take its place. If the seeker can remain truly inwardly distant and unentangled with his thoughts, then they will of their own quiet down considerably, becoming less and less frequent. It is at that crucial stage that the aspirant will need to call up in himself the utmost strength of will and watch untiringly, without sliding back again. If he can gather the necessary inner force to continue to maintain this state of intense attentiveness still further, without faltering, then he will suddenly make the surprising discovery that between each individual thought that appears, rises to its zenith, and disappears, there is a gap just before the arising of the next thought, which in his habitual ordinary state it would not have been possible for him to perceive. If the seeker can now, in as tranquil and simple a manner as possible, plunge deeper into himself while continuing to watch his thoughts, they will quiet to such a great extent that the gap between each succeeding thought will become much wider and more evident. And if, at this point, the aspirant can now fix his attention on this gap, or void (always there between every individual thought, without the seeker’s having realized it before), and can manage to increase its duration, then the realization of what this void really is will start to mysteriously dawn upon him. He will, at the same time, begin to feel in him a most extraordinary inner silence and sublime peace beyond anything that anyone can ordinarily know. It will appear to him as a divine cosmic balm, sweetly filling his whole being with an indescribable sense of sacred serenity. He will now fully realize that what at first seemed to him to be a mere emptiness is in fact filled with an infinite expanse of a highly subtle and impersonal consciousness, a mysterious invisible “Spectator” silently witnessing. This unusual state of consciousness can in some way be compared to a translucent sky without a here or a there, an up or a down, a front or a back—a clear, translucent, and immeasurable sky where there are no clouds, birds, or any other object passing across it. From the day he took his first breath to this momentous instant, the miracle of his higher nature has ever been waiting for him to remove the veil of his ordinary self and behold its radiance. Without having known it, he owes to its benign Grace his existence, his intelligence, and the continual animation and sustenance of his life. The seeker will hear this Nada very clearly inside his ears and head throughout every one of his meditations if his concentration is what it should be—sincere, true, serene, and firm, without forcing. In fact, the deeper the concentration, the louder and more shrill this mysterious sound will get, as an encouragement to the aspirant and an indication that he is moving in the right direction. It is necessary here to put the seeker on his guard that at no time and under no circumstances must he meditate with a mind fixed avidly on seeking results, whether humble or spectacular. All meditations and other spiritual practices should be done solely for the love of doing them and for the pleasure of the struggle itself, letting Divine Grace do what it knows is best for each person according to his problems, needs, and merits. The aspirant should thoroughly acquaint himself with this form of meditation, which, in addition to its importance as a means of understanding the immutable state beyond the moving mind more clearly, will be extremely useful to him in the tragic moments of his life that are unavoidable in this uncertain existence. It will be another weapon at his disposal when, on distressing days of harassment or unexpected shocks, he may encounter too great a resistance in himself to be able to quiet his thoughts and feelings sufficiently to permit him to meditate. For one should always bear in mind that, even after a certain time of practicing Nada Yoga, there is always a danger that, while actually listening to this celestial inner sound (to which one can become too habituated), one may still be (or become again) partially identified with and lost in one’s customary state of daydreaming without realizing it. In such instances, the above method of meditation could be very helpful to him indeed. If done rightly, it will in any case strengthen his will considerably and give him much more control and choice over his thoughts, even in active life, when he is in the company of other people. Once the seeker has discovered the reality of his True Nature, his meditation will become much simpler and more natural. To the degree to which he is able to abandon himself, he will, from then onward, be carried by divine Grace. Until the aspirant comes to know and understand the problem of his mind and thoughts sufficiently, they can be a real source of harassment for him, especially at the beginning of his struggles. That is why it is important for him, right from the start of his practice, to try to see how his mind works, study its reactions and thought associations, and learn to know how much reality and credence to attach to them. His task in this delicate area will be greatly eased by the above method of meditation. Each time the aspirant turns his attention inward to look at his thoughts and try to seize them, he will find only phantoms and nothing tangible for him to get hold of. His thoughts will have vanished instantly into the void, leaving in their place only a mysterious vacuum whose profound meaning and great value the seeker may at first either miss altogether or not understand. The magical fascination and hypnotic power of thoughts are such that in their habitual state of being people are not aware how they are being duped and enticed into their invisible web. They become ever-so-rapidly identified with them at every turn, blindly lending themselves to their surreptitious suggestions and hidden biddings—devoid, a large part of the time, of value for the fulfillment of their higher destiny. In the same way that the human being becomes identified with and totally believes in the dreams that he experiences when asleep, he unconsciously falls prey also to the fascination of the phenomenal world around him, as well as to his own illusory passing thoughts, unquestioningly trusting and taking them for granted as being the only true reality there is. But since each time he looks at and tries to seize these thoughts, they suddenly mysteriously disappear into nothing, leaving merely a bare emptiness in their place (thus revealing their unreal nature), an alert and perceptive seeker will realize he has found a subtle, highly effective, and astonishingly simple weapon with which, through patient and repeated practice, he may eventually free himself from the tangles and tyranny of his ordinary thinking and rise to higher spheres of the mind. In its habitual state, the mind is like a restless monkey that leaps aimlessly from one branch of a tree to another almost continuously. Without being aware of it, the human being keeps hopping inwardly from one thought to the other as they arise mechanically in him, holding on to each one in turn and beguiled most of the time into believing what they suggest to him. He is often unable even to see their contradictions and the deep trouble they get him into as he blindly obeys their promptings. Thus he becomes ever more karmically*2 entangled. Most of a person’s thoughts are mechanical repetitions, useless, shadowy, and often ridiculously contradictory to the point of being influenced by the incessant changes of the weather itself! By indiscriminately lending his attention to and complying with almost any thought that happens to cross his mind at a given moment, he can be compared to a prostitute who unquestioningly gives herself to anyone that happens to pass by, without in the least reflecting on what is happening to her and the effect that it is having on her being. If an aspirant’s thoughts are not lofty, creative, and spiritually beneficial, and if, when recurring, they are allowed to settle in his mind, then, in time, they will grow into unquestioned habitual ways of thinking, affecting and molding his being into what he will become. And, furthermore, by then blindly obeying the impulses born of these thoughts, he will ineluctably sink to lower planes of consciousness, developing deep-rooted tendencies that will be spiritually unprofitable and very difficult to free himself from later. If the seeker can firmly but quietly watch the rise and decline of each one of his thoughts without holding on to them or letting himself become enmeshed in them, he will then be more free in himself to perceive their nothingness. And what is of paramount importance is that the great void, or the screen of vast Consciousness that is behind these thoughts, will begin to appear to his inner vision. It will be like the sudden coming into view of a clear blue sky when smoke and clouds have been blown aside, revealing what was already there beyond them. Then the aspirant will discover with awe and wonderment that, just as the sky remains totally undiminished and unsullied by the passage of the smoke or clouds across it, so, and in spite of all the external mud covering him from his life’s journey on Earth, this superior state of consciousness in him has always retained its purity and sublime beauty. And it is precisely in that extraordinary fact that the hope for his emancipation lies. For this higher state in him is both a Grace and the means of the ultimate contentment that he has been so forlornly longing for and searching for so vainly throughout his terrestrial existence without having known it. As the seeker progresses, and as he can muster the necessary strength to watch his thoughts for longer and longer periods without losing himself in and becoming identified with them, the gap and vacuum between and behind each one of these thoughts will grow wider and deeper, until a moment comes when he will finally merge into and become this vast mysterious space and void, bringing him the profound peace and sublime happiness that was the state from which he originated and into which he is meant consciously to reenter when he dies—willingly foregoing all the things and experiences that he has known during his brief passage in this world. For these things and experiences were in any case meant only as a temporary means to an end, not to become attached to but there merely to serve a higher purpose and to be discarded when that purpose has been fulfilled.
  48. 2 points
    These few chapters I read will become the most profound you will ever read on topic of Anhad Naad Sangat ji. MUST MUST READ!!! It's long but definitely worth it. If this doesn't inspire anyone to start walking on the path of naam, anhad or whatever else you want to call it then nothing will. I suppose the real question we have to all ask ourselves, myself included, is do we really want to wake up???? Nada Part 1 Among the various methods of meditation practiced in ancient India to this end was a very important one called Nada Yoga, Yoga of the Sound. The science of this form of meditation seems either totally lost or inaccessible today. It appears impossible, at any rate, to find anyone who has practiced it and has sufficient knowledge of its highly subtle and intricate details to be able to teach it. Its technique will be explained to whatever extent possible in the five chapters that follow; and, because of its profound mystical significance, it will be referred to from time to time throughout the rest of the book, particularly in the chapters on Hatha Yoga. The value of this form of meditation cannot be overstated, especially for those who do not yet know where their attention should be directed, and who thus experience great difficulty retaining their concentration during meditation. Having taken his meditation posture, and prepared himself mentally and physically—by quieting his mind, relaxing, and feeling a deep global sensation of his body—the seeker should now decide firmly not to move any more. Closing his eyes, he should remain as still as possible, listening internally with sustained attention. If he can be inwardly quiet enough and deeply absorbed in the search, he will, if he is truly persistent, suddenly become aware of an unusual, feeble sound that can be heard deep inside the ears and head, concealed from him before and obscured by the din of his incessant mental restlessness. When the aspirant has become aware of the mysterious presence in him of this sound, he may at first be struck with surprise and awe, but no matter how weak or distant it may appear, it will be very obvious that this is no ordinary sound but a mystical one of a higher cosmic order. It could be called the primordial sound. If, at this stage, the seeker can succeed in remaining sufficiently alert and aware while maintaining his effort of intense concentration, he cannot possibly fail to observe that this sound has an extraordinarily uninterrupted continuity about it, a crystal-like vibration that resembles the noise of the ocean with many other different “ultra” sounds superimposed on it. When the aspirant is fully engrossed in his meditation and is sufficiently freed from the grip of his lower self, he will perceive that the more he rises to, and becomes merged in, the higher levels of his consciousness, the louder and more shrill (high-pitched and piercing) the sound will get. He will also begin to note with wonder that this sound has a curious unearthly sparkle about it, somewhat reminiscent of the flickering light of a star, so that it seems almost imperceptibly to oscillate continuously inside his head. In the beginning, he will have to be very finely tuned indeed to catch all its subtle heavenly scintillations (i.e. flash or sparkle of light), fragile movements, and the highly delicate changes of its “ultra-tones.” When the aspirant employs this Nada (inner sound) as the main support for his meditation, he must follow all its slender fluctuations, subtle variations of note, and mysterious jewel-like glitterings, second by second, with the utmost diligence. He will discover that this unusual sound with its strange vibrations, celestial twinklings, and, above all, enigmatic (difficult to interpret or understand) continuity will become a most precious support for his concentration in all his future meditations. From that day onward, the frequency with which he will lose himself in his habitual self-forgetfulness and mental reveries will decrease considerably. He will be protected from blindly wandering into the territory of his enemy—his ordinary state of being and feeling—as he so often did in the beginning of his spiritual struggles. The aspirant should not be surprised if, on certain days, this sound shifts to another part of the head, sometimes vibrating slightly to the right, at other times to the left, and even, on occasions, in the middle or back of the skull. All these changes take place to prevent his meditation from becoming stale and mechanical as well as to purify certain aspects of his mind. The special benefit that the seeker will derive from this mystical sound is priceless. First, it will sustain him in his meditation by giving his attention something definite to hold on to and so allow him to concentrate better with little or no wavering. Second, it will have a particularly purifying and calming effect on his mind as well as his feelings. Third, it will help him, little by little, to rise to the higher and more luminous planes of his consciousness. Finally, it will become the means for an ardent and sincere aspirant to become immediately aware when his attention begins to weaken and waver during his meditation, and this higher state of consciousness in him gets diluted and mixed up again with his ordinary mind—for he will not fail to observe that, at such moments, the sound has either altogether disappeared or has lost its supernal luster and subtle ultravibrations, becoming very distant and pale. When meditating with this Nada, it is essential that the aspirant always seek and follow the particular aspect of it that is most subtle and “ultra” in pitch as well as in brilliance. Even when the sound becomes very shrill (high-pitched and piercing) and loud in moments of deep concentration, he must not be tempted to be satisfied with it merely because it is sharp and resonant. He should relentlessly attempt to rise further and further into ever more subtle spheres of its mysterious invisible kingdom. Discernment (the ability to judge well) and perseverance are indispensable in this delicate and difficult work if the seeker does not want to risk stopping at that stage, losing his way, and starting to slide backward. (See the advice given in chapter 3 if you have difficulty hearing this inner sound.) Later on, the aspirant must be able to turn to this inner sound at will, endeavour to hear it clearly, and try to hold on to it during his various daily activities, whether walking in the street, writing, reading, talking, or eating. When he is finally able to hear it distinctly in outer life conditions as well as during meditation, he will be astonished to perceive that, no matter how tumultuously external noises may thunder all around, they cannot obliterate this sacred sound in him, nor interfere with, nor alter in any manner the resplendent beauty of its tone and sparkling effulgence. When the seeker uses this mystical sound as the principal basis and support for his meditation, he will notice that, each time he finishes meditating, there is an unusual sensation throughout the whole of his body that will feel strangely rarefied and weightless. He should appreciate the importance of this subtle physical sensation and learn to hold on to it in his active life as well. It will become an additional support to help him remember himself and remain more profoundly connected to his higher being as well as be more relaxed physically and conserve the vital force needed to nurture and keep the wheel of his spiritual work moving. The aspirant should look upon this Nada as a Divine Grace and rare opportunity, always turning to it with the utmost respect, revering it as the treasured means that can make his deliverance possible. However, it must be stressed that this sound is not to be taken as an end in itself, but only as a temporary prop in his spiritual struggles. If the seeker arrives at a state of higher consciousness during his meditation, then it is to this ineffable light (too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words) that his attention must turn and in which it must be absorbed. The sound, in the end, only acts as a benign (gentle and kind) guide and support toward the greater aim. Part 2 The first time the seeker hears this mystical sound when meditating, it may be very faint indeed—according to his level of being and ardour (great enthusiasm or passion). And, even if he has heard and recognized it, it may keep disappearing and reappearing every so often. It will—so to speak—play with the aspirant, constantly putting him on trial to test his perseverance; or it may vanish altogether, and the seeker will not hear it any more for some time. He must not be disheartened at this but persistently look for it, again and again, until he finally succeeds in hearing it once more. The importance of this Nada (this sacred sound) cannot be stressed enough. It could be compared to a divine signpost, compassionately indicating the way to a struggling seeker in this difficult quest. Generally, the human being’s thoughts and feelings are constantly changing. Ever tossed about by the waves of the incessant flux of his thoughts, there is no continuity of being in him. And, in his ordinary habitual state, he cannot know or even conceive what it truly means to have inner continuity of being. Without any real aim in him, he is like a dried leaf being blown helplessly hither and thither by the ever-changing winds of his inner moods, his thoughts, and his desires. And his moods, thoughts, and desires are always being influenced by external conditions as well by all sorts of unseen forces acting upon him. When the aspirant has recognized this Nada and familiarized himself well enough with it, he will perceive that, contrary to the ever-changing inner and outer conditions that he was used to up to that moment, this mystical sound has a strange unearthly continuity about it. In addition to the description of this sound given in the previous chapter, it can also be compared to the soft whisper of the wind and the continuous hissing noise of the ocean waves, with a shrill “ultra” sound on top of it, composed of all the harmonics in the Universe. On higher spheres, this sacred Nada will have a strange sort of silvery aspect to it, somewhat similar to the uninterrupted jingling sound of very little pieces of glass, with other smaller, ever more subtle sounds superimposed on it, until finally these finer sounds seem to disappear into infinity. In the beginning, the seeker should fix his attention on the part of the sound that is most shrill (high-pitched and piercing) and, as explained in the previous chapter, oscillating slightly somewhat like the twinkling of a star. It will be easier to hear that way. Later, when the aspirant gets more familiar with it, he will begin to hear two or more sounds at the same moment. At first he may not quite realize, or be really sure, that he is hearing two sounds simultaneously. However, if at such times he listens carefully, he will note that one of these two sounds is slightly more obvious, whereas the other is a little more high-pitched and more subtle. He should listen carefully to both sounds for a while until it becomes absolutely clear to him which of these two sounds is the more subtle and high pitched. It is to this one he must then gently let his attention turn and concentrate on. He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds any more—even though it will keep intruding and drawing him back to it. If the seeker has reached a sufficient degree of enlightenment and is attentive enough in outer life, he will find that, in the same way as when meditating his attention is at first drawn to the sound that is more evident, so, in the outside world, people without realizing it almost always let themselves be tempted by and attracted to the more obvious aspects of life—whereas the more subtle and finer ones unfortunately escape most people most of the time. This applies to everything that people do and to which they have leanings, including the kind of friends to whom they are drawn, the sort of entertainment to which they are attracted, the things they ordinarily like, and so forth. This tendency is equally applicable to their choice in the various arts—which is very revealing of the level of their thinking and being. The subtler and more lofty aspects of art seem always to escape the majority of people. In understanding all this, it should be apparent that, if someone is not sufficiently transformed through his spiritual struggles, and has not acquired the necessary inner discernment to deal with this tendency in him while he is still alive, then the same problem will confront him when he leaves this form of existence. He will gravitate blindly to the more obvious states, and the more subtle ones will be lost to him. When using this mystical sound as the basic support for his meditation, the seeker should also be very alert and attentive as to where the subtler aspects of this sound are drawing him within himself. He will thus, little by little, gravitate to ever finer states of consciousness and will start to sense an out-of-the-ordinary inner continuity of being that is beyond description and that it is impossible for him to experience in his habitual state. As his meditation deepens, it will bring with it a most subtle, transparent, and luminous consciousness that he will finally become immersed in and one with. He will no longer sense himself in the same way as he did in the past. He will become mysteriously transformed into an unchanging and enigmatic “Spectator,” plunged in the vast silence of an eternal cosmic “Nowness.” As human feelings and thoughts are generally in a constant state of flux, the mysterious continuity that this mystical sound possesses can, in very truth, “carry” the aspirant during his spiritual efforts. Especially at the beginning of his struggles—when he will encounter much opposition and difficulty within himself toward meditation—this sacred sound will be a benign blessing for him. It will also be a boon and an extraordinary prop in all his other spiritual practices as well. Through its Grace and help, he will gradually begin intuitively to understand and feel where he has to be placed in himself—and where, by habit, he never is. He will discover what it means to be. But this is not enough—for the seeker must now try to listen to this mystical sound in his outer life activities also. He should continuously turn to it, seek it, and, with all his sincerity and might, endeavour to hear and hold on to it while talking, eating, walking, washing, and so on. Only in this way can the will of the Divine begin to manifest itself on the lower planes of being as it already does in the higher spheres—and only in this way can the seeker’s transformation, as well as the transformation of those with whom he comes into contact, start to take place. Part 3 Just as it is not possible for a subject to decide on his own initiative to go and see his king when it pleases him without any preliminary preparation or authorization, and, especially, without an intermediary or a guide to escort him through the various halls and corridors of the palace leading to the royal chamber, so it is with an aspirant’s spiritual quest and his desire to reach the royal abode of his supreme Lord. Here also a seeker—unless he is very exceptional indeed—needs an intermediary between the Divine and himself, an intermediary that takes the form of the Sacred for him. It is essential for the aspirant to understand this and clearly see the importance and value for his spiritual search of this Nada, this mystical sound that can be mysteriously heard inside the ears and head. For this Nada is an inestimable sacred intermediary between that which is higher and divine in him and his ordinary self. It is his prodigious hope, his ever-present and trustworthy friend, his necessary guide and benign support in his various spiritual exercises and meditations. In it lies the possibility for his redemption and the fulfilment of himself. In the beginning of his struggles, it is an indispensable means to help him find his way inside the seemingly complicated labyrinth of his being, until he reaches the royal chamber of his supreme Lord and King. Having found it, he will marvel to see how strangely simple the way to it is after all. It had only escaped him in the past through its extraordinary simplicity. And what is still more curious is that this princely aspect of his nature—its sublime beauty and transparent purity unceasingly present in him—has always been imperceptibly and silently waiting there to receive him, secretly giving meaning to his existence without his having known it. Whenever he remembers to turn his look inward, he will always find it there, ever awake, unchanging, never affected nor sullied in any manner by anything that has taken place in his life. To remain connected to the divine aspect of one’s nature necessitates at every second renunciation and “dying” to one’s customary state of being and of feeling oneself. It is a difficult thing to achieve, but if done intelligently and with understanding, this renunciation will inevitably make it more and more possible for one to live in and through one’s higher aspect, until the great moment of deliverance one day dawns, heralding the ardently longed-for liberation from bondage to one’s lower nature with its never-ending exigencies (an urgent need or demand) and tormenting cravings. In the beginning of their quest, it is necessary for most people to make very great and sustained efforts with the utmost sincerity and determination. But they also need some definite thing to hold onto that can assist and guide them in this difficult spiritual journey and prevent them wandering blindly, trying to find the secret door to their True Being, hoping by chance to fall upon it. That is why this inner mystical sound is like a precious sacred rope thrown down by Divine Grace to a drowning seeker—by the aid of which he may eventually pull himself out of the dark pit of his lower nature up to the light and vast expanse of his higher consciousness. Before someone can even be allowed to pass through the gates of a palace, let alone appear before his monarch, he must prepare himself in all kinds of ways. He has first to learn the necessary etiquette, clean himself, and dress in a fitting manner, thus making himself worthy of such a royal encounter. Likewise, it is necessary for an aspirant to purify himself from at least some of his undesirable tendencies, negative emotions, and warped thinking before it is possible for him to rise to higher spheres in himself and be permitted to enter and abide in such sacred regions. It should be understood that it is impossible for a seeker to climb to the higher realms of his consciousness if his being is still tainted and heavily encumbered with unprofitable worldly desires, useless fantasies, all sorts of unfulfilled dreams, and his unsound judgments and misdeeds—like so much dust that has collected on him from some remote past and his present terrestrial journey. Before one can look through a window and view the light that is on the other side, one must necessarily clean it first. Similarly, the cleaning and ordering of the aspirant’s inner “home” are imperative—at least to some extent—before he can be authorized to have access to sacred territories within him and contemplate the Sublime beyond his limited, ordinary self. Otherwise, as stated earlier, each time he attempts to rise in himself, he will simply be flung down again to the state that conforms to his level of being. Furthermore, he will keep suffering from this condition, without at first understanding its true cause, until a sufficient degree of transformation has finally taken place in him to allow him to maintain himself in these luminous regions for longer periods at a time without losing them so easily as before. When the seeker concentrates on this inner mystical sound during his meditation, it acts as a sacred intermediary between him and the Sublime in himself, indicating the way and, at the same time, helping free him from identification with his lower nature, drawing him further and further away from it to the higher realms of his being through which the purification of his ordinary self will start taking place. The concentration on this sacred sound will occupy the aspirant’s attention in such a manner as to make it easier for him to keep away from unwanted thoughts and remain inwardly more collected and quiescent during his meditation. This will, little by little, allow another state of consciousness to begin mysteriously manifesting itself to his inner vision, a vastly different consciousness from the one he is used to in his routine existence. In the beginning, this state will seem to most people to be merely a strange emptiness that they cannot comprehend. It may not mean much to some at first, while others may be disturbed and even frightened by it. Because their being is still not refined enough and prepared for such an experience, they will not be able to recognize and appreciate a thing of such profound magnitude—just as, in a similar way, an ordinary person cannot at first be expected to understand and appreciate the fineness of great works of art if his level of being is not yet sufficiently raised. However, in the case of a sincere aspirant, even though he may not yet be fully ready to understand and recognize this superior state of consciousness in him as being something of a higher cosmic order, he will, nevertheless, begin to experience an unusual peace and a feeling of remarkable well-being that will greatly help and encourage him in his future efforts. If, at times, especially in the beginning, the seeker experiences some difficulty in hearing this mystical sound, then, immediately on waking up first thing in the morning, he should turn his attention inward to look for it, and listen intently. He will find it astonishingly shrill and loud at that particular hour. It will be clearly heard, oscillating gently and sparkling with such sublime beauty that, as said earlier, it may only be compared to the jewel-like twinkling light of a heavenly star. It should always accompany the aspirant in his struggles, sustaining him in all his meditations and other spiritual exercises. This mystical sound is like a sacred hook of Grace cast down to the seeker to help draw him away from his ordinary state of being. Getting away from his habitual way of thinking and feeling and “emptying” himself constitute the preliminary essential step to allow something of a higher order to fill the void he will have created in himself. Only in this way can the holy descent of Grace take place in him and pervade his being with its divine flame—the indispensable instrument for the purification and transformation of his lower nature, which will eventually render him worthy and strong enough to be able to stand in the presence of his supreme Monarch and bear his royal look and light without cringing. When the seeker has undergone sufficient purification and transformation, and insofar as he has learned to “die” to himself, he will then inevitably rise and become merged with this effulgent light in the same way that evaporating water rises into the air and merges with it under heat from the sun. Part 4 The aspirant must arrive at the understanding that it is not enough to have had the Grace and privilege of hearing this inner mystical sound. What is more important afterward is how he listens to it, with what aim, and what spiritual value he attaches to it for his salvation. He will be very much helped in all this if he observes how his interest changes all the time. He will see it continuously falter, weaken, and alter its course with the slightest association of thoughts that arise in his mind. His interest has to be constantly renewed and redirected onto its intended track and main spiritual objective each time it deviates from them—and this must apply to whatever other forms of yoga the aspirant practices and whatever other means of support he uses for his attention during meditation. How the attention is directed to and poised on this sacred inner sound, and with what determination it is held there—in both duration and depth—will determine the degree of the inner spiritual freedom and spiritual light the seeker will experience during and after his meditation. And the appearance and experience of this spiritual light, as well as the exalted feeling that will follow from it, will act as a benign token, enheartening him to make yet further efforts to remain connected to this luminous aspect of his nature. The aspirant has to teach himself always to be in a state of alert watchfulness. At any moment, robbers of all sorts can enter the doorways of his being and steal away his attention if he is not sufficiently on his guard. Then this unusual expanse of pure consciousness in him will become adulterated again and recede once more into the background. If a seeker is not wary enough, all the pleasurable or painful impressions he receives from the outside world—and especially how he receives these impressions—can often enmesh him and stick to him, leaving in him, long afterward, inner disorders, confused thoughts, and troubled feelings difficult to disentangle himself from. He must learn to become very discriminating in what he allows to enter into the gates of his being. If he is advanced enough on this spiritual path, and if he is sufficiently enlightened, he will see how impartial and unaffected he can be by certain outer impressions and how much protection he can also benefit from by remaining internally ever-attentive to the mysterious song of this sacred Nada. Apart from his concentration on it when meditating in the seclusion of his home, by constantly seeking to hear this mystical sound in active life as well, he will gradually learn to be more distant and free from the aspect of himself that is open to temptation and vulnerable to the unprofitable outside influences that make him forget his spiritual aim. As he becomes more aware of himself and more experienced, this sound will permit him to see more rapidly when his attention is being solicited and about to be taken away from him again. It will also help him observe how his attention is being enticed by these marauders (raiders) disguised as friends. If one could see these seducers as they really are, in their true form, there would be no problem. The trouble is that they never come openly in their real guise, but always as seemingly pleasant friends and benefactors offering dreams of future delights—most of which are in reality unattainable—or instant pleasures that could ultimately greatly hinder the aspirant’s spiritual evolution. Anything that entices, claims, and in the end totally absorbs and ensnares his attention is his real and only enemy. And, each time he forgets his supreme inner Lord and falls asleep in himself again, he commits without realizing it the most serious sin there is against his own being. At such moments, it can truly be said that the fall of the human being is nothing more nor less than this curious forgetting of himself—that is to say, the forgetting of his higher nature and the awareness of his existence. It is in this state of self-forgetfulness that all wrong actions are performed in life. With the aid of this mystical sound, the aspirant will have a better chance of remaining vigilant and connected to his inner Source, abiding for longer and longer periods in a state of self-recollectedness. He will ultimately come to see for himself that he is conscious of his existence solely during moments when he feels this state of inner presence. The rest of the time, when he is in his habitual state of oblivion, he feels his existence little and—according to the degree to which he is absent—may even have no awareness of it at all. Through all this work, the aspirant, if he is sincere and serious enough, will one day suddenly discover that, without his having known it before, he is all the time living on many different planes simultaneously, and that whatever he thinks or does on a certain plane instantaneously colours and affects all the other planes for better or for worse. When, during moments of profound inner presence, the seeker is intensely touched by feelings belonging to the domain of the Sublime, they will pervade and light up all the different planes of himself from the inside toward all the outer layers of his nature in a manner of which one cannot conceive if one has not yet experienced the remarkable spiritual elevation that being present to the higher aspect of oneself confers. If the aspirant can have the strength not to give in to any bad or unprofitable external influence and impression, not allowing them to enter and colour his being, then it will be his innermost nature that will shine forth its effulgent light toward the outside of himself and fill him with its radiance. Part 5 Sooner or later, the day will come when the seeker will be faced with the imperative necessity to have to make the firm decision to try to remain attentive to this sacred sound at all times—no matter where he is or in what other spiritual exercise he is engaged—until he finally succeeds in establishing in him a certain degree of inner presence. And he will have to make this effort through the full understanding of the need for it, so that there will be no unnecessary and harmful violation of himself while trying to achieve this aim. This will inevitably involve the continuous renunciation of his habitual state of being, with all its ever-changing cravings, day-dreaming, and useless fancies. The aspirant will then be confronted with the vital problem of having at all moments voluntarily to agree to forego or “die” to a certain aspect of himself—at least in some measure to start with—so that something higher in him can come to the foreground of his being and occupy its place. He will clearly see how hard this renunciation is. For various reasons, he may not be able to keep up such an intense and prolonged effort. He will probably in time tire of doing it, and, unknowingly, slide backward little by little, settling once more into his old habitual state of being. Without perhaps realizing it, he will then start to sleep inwardly again, thinking that he is still working by being merely satisfied with the intellectual knowledge and memory of certain limited spiritual experiences he may have had in the past. If, after long, arduous, and sustained efforts, an aspirant has arrived at some degree of spiritual awakening and is not heedful enough of this particular kind of pitfall, then, owing to the self-complacency and pride that may surreptitiously install themselves in him through the little knowledge he has gleaned (making it more dangerous for him and everybody else than if he had not known anything at all on such a weighty subject), he will fritter away his further spiritual possibilities and life. Later, if, by chance, he realizes what has happened, it will be much more difficult for him to start making fresh efforts of such magnitude again. There can be no compromise in this matter: either the aspirant’s attention is consciously absorbed in seeking to live in the higher aspect of his being, which demands a certain continual sacrifice of his ordinary self (using this sacred sound as a temporary support for that), or he lives blindly, his attention being constantly taken by his lower nature and wasted in worthless preoccupations that require no effort whatsoever from him—gravity being always happy to drag him down to the inferior levels of his being. The living flame of a lamp can only continue to burn and shine forth its radiance if there is an incessant sacrifice of the wick and oil in the lamp. T The seeker who has embarked on this difficult spiritual journey must realize as quickly as possible—so as not merely to grope his way about, struggling without right comprehension—that his attention is the cardinal element that goes to animate and nourish either the one or the other aspect of his being, rendering its manifestation possible. While striving to remain inwardly attentive to this mystical sound, if he has been favoured with true spiritual awakening he will be very much helped to see, without any mistake, how at every moment of his life the two aspects of his nature are both calling to him to follow them at the same time. In the past, he simply obeyed the dictates of his ordinary self unquestioningly and, by so doing, he has unknowingly made himself what he is today. But, now, he is faced with the personal responsibility of an imperative choice to have to make constantly: the choice between the side of his nature he is to give himself to and uninterruptedly sustain with his attention so as to permit this ineffable flame to continue to shine in his being, and the aspect of himself he must perpetually sacrifice so that the higher can affirm its presence in him. It is a cosmic law that the two cannot co-exist simultaneously—in the same way that it is not possible to put pure water in a jar already filled with crude earth without emptying and cleaning it beforehand. When an aspirant lives through the ordinary aspect of himself, this inner mystical sound will not be audible to him. The more he sinks to the lower planes of his nature, passively letting his interest and attention become involved with its incessant inner clamours and preoccupations, the more this Nada will recede into the background of his being until it is not heard any further. If he has been privileged enough to hear and recognize this sacred sound, he must then make every possible effort to try to remain in contact with it at all moments. He may one day discover that he can even be aware of its presence during sleep. This primordial sound is there, in him, and in all things at all times. In certain mystical states, one can hear it vibrating mysteriously in the Cosmos and in all the heavenly stars, just as it is also vibrating in the Sun in a most spectacular way! The seeker must later endeavour to hear this inner sound in very noisy places. He must choose the busiest streets, and strive to hear this sacred Nada with the utmost of his might until the day he arrives at doing so. He will thereafter be surprised to find that, no matter how loud the uproar thunders around him, it is perfectly possible for him to hear this mystical sound vibrating in him with such clarity that there is absolutely nothing external that can drown it. When he is able to hear it in such conditions, he must then struggle to hold onto it in the most difficult situations possible without losing it. In the beginning, as he tries to hear it while walking outside, he should take a tree or any object ahead of him as a landmark and continually aim at it (looking at it from the corner of his eyes), using the distance that separates him from it as a temporary support to remain aware of himself. When reaching this landmark, he must immediately aim at another, ahead of him, all the time carefully listening inwardly to this sacred sound. This inner Nada will become his most precious ally and alarm signal, warning him when he begins to falter and forget himself again. In that manner, he will begin to be protected from harmful identification with external conditions and the many pernicious influences of the outside world. When the aspirant succeeds in holding onto this sacred sound in such difficult conditions without losing it, a moment will finally arrive when he will become strangely distant from himself, and he will start viewing everything around him from another perspective altogether. He will feel that his vision seems to have inexplicably receded to the outside top part of the back of his head, from where he silently and impartially begins to witness all that is taking place around him. Everything will then be seen to be in a constant state of flux. From this uninvolved position, he will perceive that there is absolutely nothing permanent in any animate or inanimate object that meets his gaze. The whole panorama of outer existence will appear to unfurl in front of him as a sort of strange and fantastic dream. And behind it all, he will mysteriously see through his mind’s eye, so to speak, the Unity of all things—“That” which is pervading him and everything else at the same time. The seeker should never forget the significance and value of this mystical sound. It must be looked upon as a benign friend and salutary aid, always there behind the turmoil of his never-ending outer problems and worries, ever knocking at his door to awaken him and help him to become again conscious of himself in a manner that is not habitual to him. But people are generally too preoccupied to hear its sublime call or pay attention to it when it becomes manifest in them. External matters and their physical needs, as well as all their inner anxieties and incessant imaginings, take up the whole of their attention. It is as if something in them said: “Later, later, I must first finish what I am doing.” But “later” never comes. There is always something else claiming one’s attention—and another precious opportunity is lost. One must learn to be always ready and available to the higher calling of this ineffable aspect of one’s nature so as to render one’s spiritual growth and unfolding possible before it is too late—earthly existence being so uncertain. If the aspirant is really serious in his spiritual practice and has had the rare privilege to have heard this wondrous mystical sound, has recognized it, and is deeply moved by it, appreciating and venerating its presence in him, the latter will, of itself, commence to appear to him suddenly at most unexpected moments of the day. Like a divine emissary, it will knock at the gate of his soul, calling him to himself. How he greets this inner call at that particular moment is of paramount importance for him. For the manner in which he welcomes it will determine the frequency of the future visits of this heavenly messenger. The aspirant’s inner response to its calling must always be: “Yes, and a thousand times yes to Thee.” Each time it is there, singing in his ears, the seeker’s attitude to it should be that of a profoundly devout servant, ever ready to answer the call of his supreme Lord and King. At such moments, he must be fully aware, with the utmost of his sincerity, that “It is here! It is here again, singing inside my ears, calling me!” This mystical sound is truly like a hook of Grace. It is the hook of Grace of a divine fisherman trying to drag the aspirant out of the dark quagmire in which he is sadly entrapped. The seeker will abruptly become aware of its presence in him at odd moments of the day, permitting him to see more clearly into the unhappy state by which he had been engulfed a moment before, and to what higher aspect of his nature he is called to turn once more. As his inner awareness deepens, the strange song of this mystical sound will grow correspondingly louder and more shrill in his ears. It will sing inside his head with such supernal beauty as to make him intoxicated with its celestial wine. In that way, it will also encourage and sustain him in moments when suffering cannot be avoided in this form of existence. It will, at all times, help draw him away from his habitual little self and assist him in his efforts to climb out of the mud and unhappy state into which he has sunk and to raise him to the ever-higher realms of his Supreme Being.
  49. 2 points
    Yes veer ji i do feel that our history was changed during the colonial period. Cos it was during this time that banis were shortend such as Sri Rehras Sahib,Chupai Sahib etc. Also banis as Ugardanti,Bramh Kavach and many more banis was taken out of the Sri Dasam Granth Sahib only Sri Hazur Sahib and Budha Dal kept these banis preserved.
  50. 1 point
    Thanks veer ji for sharing i didn't know about this.
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