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  1. 6 points
    Outside of nitnem, isn't the rest of Gurbani an expansion/elaboration of this? I think because we are used to certain styles of written communication in English, we may sort of expect similar styles in Gurbani, but it doesn't appear to work like that from what I can gather. It's very subtle, it's not like a lot of Abrahamic stuff that appears to be direct. Because we are dealing with the subconscious and deeply concealed aspects of the munh, it has to be approached differently. Diverting and dealing with the munh (which any of us who have tried to practice simran can see clearly has a mind of it's own), isn't an easy task. So Gurbani goes beyond overtly conscious thought and tries to tap into more deeply rooted, hidden aspects of our psychology. I don't think we can reach those parts with overt, explicit directives like other faiths try to do. My personal experiences has been that it soothes and calms the psyche - I might be wrong but it seems like a device to help prep the mind for better naam-simran? We have elaboration by Bhai Gurdas which elucidates things in layman's terms. I think the archaic use of the word 'sublime' may help explain the way Gurbani interacts with the practitioner. And because we are all at different stages (probably due to karma), it wouldn't make sense to create a sort of explicit manual for this. This is what makes it so different to Abrahamic thinking. It tries to elicit something subtle but powerful already within that we are alienated from, rather than pour something inside of us. It's not a simple thing from what I can gather, on a human front we are dealing with higher cognitive functioning here, but then trying go beyond that. I don't claim to know it all, because it is sooooo deep. So please feel free to disagree. This is just how it seems to me right now. And I say this knowing full well, that I'm full of my own augunhs too, and struggle with them.
  2. 6 points
    Sat1176

    Sleep during meditation

    If your doing simran slowly and elongated (with slow long breathing) then sehaj avasta will naturally come as mind stills. Personally I don't think it's a bad thing. Lets say your doing you jaap during the day and you have had a good nights sleep then this is a very good stage. If your lacking sleep then it can also be a natural body response. If once in sehaj there are no dreams and thought, then that is also very good. If your falling into dreams then not so good. Ideally one need to start hearing anhad shabads in this sunn/sehaj state. This can take time to manifest. In one katha I heard you have to repeatedly keep pushing the mind into this state and eventually the mind begins to awaken within. When in the stage of no thoughts whether conscious or unconscious two jahaj's take off from that place. One is that of anhad shabad, and the second is that of falling into dreams and into thoughts and visions. You want to take the jahaj that is naam and keep surti attached to that with no thoughts. If you want to stay awake you will need to do jaap with determination, josh and more faster pace. I took these notes from Gurmat Meditation youtube channel about how to go to sleep with simran and continue bhagti throughout the night. Maybe it will offer you some guidance. 1.Elongate waaaahe guuuuru jap and listen to dhun. This should help stop thoughts 2.Listen to sehaj dhun if you can hear dhun and fall asleep 3.You will enter deep sleep without dreams 4.Then after some time you will come back for a short moment. Maybe to change sides. Don’t open eyes. Repeat gurmantar with surti or listen to anhad shabad or start gurmantar again. 5.You will fall asleep again. 6.Then you will awake again. 7.Listen to anhad or simran 8.5 shabads will start 9.Anhad Toor (very loud) may come as combined sounds or like loud horn being blown 10.Put dhyan (listen) on Toor if possible after which Parkash may manifest 11.Put dhyan (look) on Parkash (Transparent glistening light - Nirankar)
  3. 5 points
    I think naad refers to the divine word. This where the ringing or deep humming originates from. It's the single ek shabad that made creation and is present in everything and everywhere. Anhad bani is difficult to explain but may be easier to understand as the gyan coming through and from the naad. It is the bani, that has no akaar , that one hears via the naad. Just like the bani in sri guru granth sahib that gives us gyan via akhar(words), the anhad bani has no letters or words. If that makes sense?
  4. 5 points
    Thank you again, and now I completely understand why did you want to share the post with me. Actually while looking for a way of not sleeping, by the grace of guru ji's, I found how to do rom rom simran. what you shared I also started doing for last 10 days. I am going to keep on practicing this. I am making good progress but wants to do rom rom simran all the time instead of me focusing and starting this by controlling my breath and moving the focus on heartbeat and then naval pulses. I hope this will start automatically at some time. Thank you again for sharing this, It confirms that I am moving in the right direction.
  5. 5 points
    Mooorakh

    Simran help needed!

    Yes darling that's wat I mean. .. And I really don't understand why sinful?? I mean is it something bad or wrong we are doing intentionally?? It's something natural.. If it's wrong then he's at fault he's committing sin not me. I have mentioned it before.. This is something that a woman should be proud of... As it makes her productive... BTW Simran is food for soul. Do we stop eating during periods?? Rather since we r physically not that active during these days, we can put in more time for Waheguru ji Haina??
  6. 5 points
    Gosh this gyan is so deep that it's so difficult to absorb. I somewhat remember the slide that used to be shown on mysimran.info God | You where the line represents your thoughts (khoor da paal) dividing the two. Problems in Meditation and Their Equivalent When Dying The aspirant will notice (if he is honest enough and truly seeks to know himself) that, in the beginning of his spiritual practice, when he is still struggling with the initial efforts to remain as “present” and as concentrated as he can during his meditation, he has a hidden desire to stop most of the time—and is almost even relieved when he finishes meditating. It is as though he is secretly glad to return to his customary outer-life conditions, once more settling into the ease of his usual vain reveries, habitual feelings, and ordinary preoccupations, preferring all this—including the worries, turmoil, and endless pains this condition brings with it—than to have to make the requisite effort to remain concentrated and present to himself; it is as if, in some inconceivably strange way, he needed all these inner and outer problems to fill an emptiness in his life, which would otherwise be too intolerable to support. The aspirant must clearly see what is happening in him during his meditation (something which, in the usual course of events, would remain concealed from his knowledge) so that the reverse of this way of meditating starts to take place in him. That is to say, instead of secretly wishing to finish his spiritual practice quickly so as to go back to whatever is drawing him outwardly, he will actually long to accomplish rapidly whatever is preoccupying him externally in order to be able to return to his meditation—failing which, there will always be a hidden conflict in him while he is trying to meditate, and his spiritual efforts may then come to nothing. He may finally even be prompted to give up his meditation altogether—something that happens to many seekers without their realizing the true cause for it. But what has been said above must on no account be taken to signify that the seeker should neglect or fulfill his outer duties poorly—for everything must be used as a means to render one more refined, noble, and worthy. When, during his meditation, the aspirant begins to be touched by the effulgence of his Supreme Being, he will, of himself, little by little—through a quiet and subtle discernment that will have imperceptibly germinated in him—start to feel the uselessness of the ordinary aspect of himself in which he has passed the greater part of his earthly existence. He will begin to wish to return continually to this blissful state of reverential inner silence each time he becomes separated from it, in much the same way that someone wants to hear again and again the inspiring strains of a sublime and highly moving piece of music for the feeling of great beauty and subtle truth it inexplicably echoes in the depths of his being. The seeker will, from then onward, ardently look forward to every moment he can get away from his ordinary preoccupations in order to come back to his meditation. And, as he goes deeper into himself, experiencing ever greater states of inner tranquillity and ecstasy, not only will his meditation become less and less difficult, but there will naturally grow in him an untiring desire and love for it. This beatific and immutable state that he will experience during his meditation will become for him the only true reality there is in these ever-changing conditions of an impermanent worldly existence. He will now yearn to be able to maintain this unusual state of inner presence in active life as well. He will perceive for himself the urgent need there is for it. For he will find that the more he can remain present to himself in outer life, the more it will afterward have a positive effect on his meditation as well; and the deeper the absorption in meditation, the more present he will be able to be in active life also. Thus, the one will help the other. At the beginning of his practice, a sincere seeker may have noticed that not only was his restless mind refusing to give up its preoccupations and making him even secretly long to finish meditating in order to return to outer activities that kept surreptitiously calling him to them, but that he was also at times using all kinds of subtle inner arguments and pretexts to cease his meditation and get up—because of the necessity to attend to all sorts of important matters first that urgently needed settling. What he may not really see in the beginning is that to all of these things he was, and still is, painfully attached. As has been said earlier, a reversal of the aspirant’s feelings and way of being during his spiritual practice is of extreme importance and must start to take place in him while he is still alive. Just as, when trying to meditate, something in him refuses to abandon whatever it is preoccupied with and to which it is in fact deeply attached, so, when this momentous hour comes when he will be called upon to relinquish his earthly envelope, the same phenomenon will then take place in him. That is to say, all his thoughts and feelings will, at that crucial moment, be directed out toward the world to which he is unwittingly about to bid farewell and to which he has become accustomed and so desperately attached (it being the only thing he has known). Without being aware of it, his attention will be focused with acute nostalgia and pain mainly on the things he was familiar with, on his unsatisfied desires and on his unrealized dreams, most of which are profitless and weighty baggage, unhelpful to him for the great lone journey he is about to embark upon—a lone journey for which he may now find himself dramatically unprepared. He will sense an inexplicable fear and unconscious refusal to enter and abide in this—hitherto unknown to him—mysterious state, a state of subtle consciousness that will seem to him as an incomprehensible void but which, in reality, is his true condition of Being, the Divine Source from which he and all sentient beings originated. If he has not come to recognize the Sacred in himself while still carrying his mortal body, if he has not arrived at a state of knowing this luminous consciousness and vast cosmic silence during his lifetime—be it only a little—then it will not be possible for him to understand it after he leaves this form of existence. When, in active life, the aspirant learns to be more and more “present”—inwardly connected to his Supreme Source—he will then already and inevitably be practicing this indispensable detachment from the bondage to his ordinary self. And each time he loses the felicity of this inner presence again, he will feel as if shipwrecked and cast on a parched, empty, and harsh desert island. It will then seem to him like a cruel inner death. Like a drowning person gasping for breath, he will feel suffocated and experience a painful need to return once more to the fullness of the celestial aspect of his double nature. He will begin to realize that this is the only true life there is and the only real Source from which a higher wisdom can come. If one’s meditation is to become what it should really be—that is to say, pure in the strictest sense of the word—then it is necessary to be able to perceive clearly whenever this higher state of being has become diluted and mixed up again with one’s ordinary state of consciousness. Meditation in its truest sense requires the utmost vigilance and sincerity on the part of the aspirant. At the same time, care must be taken never to force it. The effort to remain present to oneself, although resolute, must at the same time be a very calm and gentle one. The intensity of this effort has to be in the right proportion, neither too much nor too little. If it is overdone, one will not be able to maintain it, and its aftereffect may be very unpleasant. And if it is underdone, it will lead nowhere: one will simply dream away. The aspirant must also, little by little, learn the subtle art of recognizing when the right and delicate moment has arrived for him cautiously to start relaxing his effort, as well as the extent to which he should do so in order to abandon himself to that which is higher in him without the risk of sinking again into his habitual state. Like a kite that has finally become airborne, he should now let himself be carried by the resplendent light of his Supreme Being and be merged in and “one with” the sublime ocean of this Immutable Celestial Consciousness in him. When the aspirant first starts this spiritual work, he will observe that hardly has he touched a more exalted state in himself than his ordinary self and habitual feeling immediately rise up again like a big tidal wave to engulf it. If, after persistent and patient efforts, he can later find enough strength to sustain this superior state of awareness for longer periods, he will then see with yet greater clarity how difficult it is to keep up the quality of this unusual presence in its purest condition for more than a short while, and how, before he realizes what is happening, this state will have begun to be adulterated once more and mixed up with his customary lower consciousness. If he does not clearly see and understand this problem, then there will always be the risk that whatever light that might reach him from the higher regions of his being will always become mingled with all kinds of fantasies and imaginings from his inferior self, and this ineffable divine flame will once more become smothered before it is given the chance fully to reveal and affirm its august presence in him. And if, during meditation, this luminous expanse of consciousness becomes adulterated and diluted in the slightest degree with his habitual state, it will then inevitably cease to be the Truth. For it cannot mix or coexist with his old self and will unavoidably recede into the background, once more becoming obscured and hidden from him, veiled by the haze of his ordinary thinking. Its place will have been usurped once again by his customary everyday self. The greatest sincerity, integrity, and tenacity are vital at the beginning of the aspirant’s struggles. As he advances, he will, little by little, discover the subtle way of sitting still—being actively passive and vigilantly immobile—whereby, in a simple and natural way, he becomes connected to and “one with” the higher aspect of his being. To fully recognize this exalted state in oneself as being the Ultimate and Supreme Truth is to have found the secret key that will open the door of this enigmatic prison in which one is enclosed, eventually releasing one from the tyranny and bondage of one’s lower nature and of duality. One’s purification and deliverance from all the sufferings that ensued from one’s ordinary self will have now begun. It also signifies the extraordinary hope of eventually overcoming death itself—on condition that one has fully understood what death really is. That is to say, in what sense it is to be taken, in what manner one is “dying” all the time without seeing it, and which aspect of one’s nature is subjected to it.
  7. 5 points
    Most inspiring katha vichar. Those walking on this path of simran will gain a lot of guidance from this video if you listen carefully. For those who hear the high pitched frequency sound like peeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee or teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee. Listen from time index 12:25 seconds to the video below (although advised to listen to the whole thing ). There were many posts in this thread when we talked about it and others ask if that was it.
  8. 4 points
    Just had an amazing experience. I was just laying down and heard my pulse but also found myself chanting "vahe-guru" with each heart beat. I tried to see if I was making up things so I tried to stop it but it didn't stop. It just kept going. My body was completely still like one in deep sleep to the point I thought I wasn't even in my body anymore.
  9. 4 points
    The above 2 post by Lucky and Sat veerji help with some contrast. It is really difficult to explain since characteristics change as you climb. Maybe easier to imagine the naad or divine word (mentioned), as a baseline sound. After all, it is the sound that exists everywhere and from which all creation was created. The anhad bani, akath katha, sehaj dhun, toor etc.. all come from this origin. 1) The journey starts when you first begin to hear it faintly. (ring/hum coming from naad) 2) Encounter other sounds as you progress and these are first heard whilst in maya. 3) After going through various maya sounds which I see have been referred to as pavan shabads on previous posts, the person eventually gets into deeper void(sunn). (maya sounds is my way of describing sounds where seeker is still in maya and not in 4th chautha padh) 4) In chautha pad(outside maya), more experiences occur like 5 shabads again, anhad bani, akath katha.... until eventually you get into the true baseline naad again. This time it's different since you are hearing outside if tres-gun maya. You could say it's the true naad and some gurmukhs actually only refer to this sound as the naad. Hence, the confusion. Nevertheless, it's still coming from same source and is still that baseline. Difference is whether you hear it in tres-gun or outside of tres-gun. This is my understanding. Bhul chuk marf if it's contrary to what other gurmukhs or bhai saab may explain.
  10. 4 points
    I thought it was as follows: 1) Swaas Graas simran by chanting Gurmantra to stop the thoughts. 2) Enter the Sunn (going to sleep to rest) 3) Stay awake by dhyaan when free of thoughts. (Now try and stay awake without falling completely asleep but still in that thoughtless stage) 4) The divine words appear in Sunn. (This is called Sehaj Dhun. The fine high pitched sound) 5) Anhad Bani (the divine music) appears. (Countless other sounds are heard here including the 5 anhad sounds), aka shabad ghanaray) 6) The mind enters the Sunn (third Sunn). 7) Naad (word of God) appears which will help us cross the Bhavsagar (the dangerous ocean). (This is when one hears the single loud sound of toor/naad/combination of the 5 sounds/ek shabad) This is the jahaj that carries the mind across. The mind unites with God in Sehaj Ghar.  
  11. 4 points
    I'll attempt answering whilst i'm online at the moment. The way I understand it and as per some of Tohana sahib's recodrings; the bandgi or bhagti starts when you start listening and merging (samao) into naam shabad. This is also called doing naam seva and is a process of gyaan and dhyiaan. Gurmantar or jap of any mantar of form, written word or 'akaar' as in waheguru, ram ram, hari.. should lead you to the state of hearing the naam that has no written or describable akaar. You could call it the formless stage of hearing the dhun of naam that will lead to amrit and jyot illumination.. I hope you understand it a little better? I believe that it's also when a person starts to re-write their own lekha to some extent.
  12. 4 points
    lol. I was an infant in 76. Watched the movie in late 80's and became a huge fan. Don't want to go off topic here but a movie is a movie. it can't be classed as gurmat or manmat. The mat is what comes from within the individual as far as I understand. The only focus you want for "next station" is to be as thoughtless and still as possible, ready to surrender your complete self. (That's my personal suggestion). The sound you hear is positive, and by aiming to surrender in a thoughtless state. is the only way I know to help build the love. Trying to conquer different shabads never helped me but as Bhai saab says in recording you have to aim to "samao" into shabad. Please persist with patience because amrit drip and illumination of jot should come in this process. Stay motivated. I've started re-reading posts on here and listening to recordings in order to motivate myself again. Do whatever it takes to achieve this.
  13. 4 points
    Someone seeked clarification via PM of what was said in this video. Thought I would summarise some of it here. 1 Doing loads of waheguru simran leads to rom rom simran. This can be felt like if all your body hair or pores are standing up. For example like when your cold, nervous or even tickled. 2 You do Waheguru gurmantar simran to bring all your thoughts to only one word/akhar "waheguru". Eventually your mind becomes still and you slowly quieten the jaap of even waheguru leaving only a silent awareness called Sunn. 3. All that now remains is your awareness of looking at the darkness in your head but no words of thought or mental chatter remain. Just a calm presence/awareness. 4. Then people start hearing sounds. These sounds people describe and whistling or teeeteee or peeeeee or like crikets etc. Because we are not used to listening to these types of sounds and are used to words of language we find it odd and think they are meaningless and useless sounds. We still want to use words or receive words. We are not aware that the language of the Waheguru is anhad sounds/anhad bani and not words. We have not developed practise or love/pyaar in listening to these sounds. People fob them off as teetee, peeepeee tinnitus etc. Not knowing that these sounds would lead you more closer/deeper towards Sach/Truth/Nirankar if only you listened to them.
  14. 4 points
    Warning: Keep alert
  15. 4 points
    I think it is like this because it is used to recondition the munh. Repetition in various different ways can achieve that. It's like when you are trying to teach someone something (who isn't that sharp). You have to keep repeating stuff over time using different examples until it becomes imbibed.
  16. 4 points
    Dhan Sri Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji Sache Patshah Ji Maharaj, May 27.
  17. 4 points
    Sukh_preet

    Simran help needed!

    Hanji, she's right
  18. 4 points
    Mooorakh

    Simran help needed!

    Absolutely! N thanks to our Gurbani that makes things clear for us.. Guru Sahib says that unclean is 'Not' the woman with periods it's that every person who is filled with an unclean mann- filth of paap. Gurbani has answers to everything in life. It's amazing!!
  19. 4 points
    Listen from 22:30 minutes where he explains stages of gurmantar jap and how to tell How to tell when Sass Giras Parpakh –Only sound of jap (Gurmantar) will remain and body will be forgotten –Rom Rom will start –Mind will enter in Sunn state either via sleep or consciously awake but silent (dhyan) –When you hear sehaj dhun in sunn then listen to this. –No load on body whilst listening (like listening in dream state) –When listening to sehaj dhun (anhad) •Jat/Sat/Sunjam •Mind will get brahm gyan •More anhad sounds •Naad - Toor (Loud Powerful Sound) •Parkash •Amrit Ras •Sunn Mandal / Astral Plane and beyond
  20. 4 points
    Some people do jaap of Gurmantar to keep the mind present during a walk. Wahe left foot, Guru right foot. The Practice of Concentration While Walking Outside All men and women have in them, without knowing it, an enormous reserve of strength and energy, much of which remains unused. If these forces are not consciously channelled and constructively utilized into some form of physical, intellectual, or artistic work, then, like milk that turns sour when left standing, these forces will turn negative, or even become destructive—as can often be seen in many children and adults. For special reasons that may not be comprehensible to the ordinary person, life always procreates in an excess of abundance—but cosmic laws demand that nothing in the Universe can remain static or unused or be wasted. When unproductive, these forces will—depending on the person’s type and temperament—either go inward, acting against the person himself and eventually destroying him without his being aware of it, being used up in worries, anxieties, and restlessness, or they will flow outwardly, into sensuality, propagating tensions and strife around him—and even, on a wider scale, in engendering wars! These extra energies in the human being are destined to be utilized for his spiritual quest and struggles, as well as to adorn the world with the beauties of great artistic creations. When these higher aims are not fulfilled, then, as always, gravity will pull these forces in the only other direction they can go—downward. Most states of depression, negative emotions, and sensual desires are generally indications of unused energies. A vigilant aspirant should immediately recognize these symptoms when they arise in him and try to give his forces a positive and creative outlet before they turn rancid and seep through his being, secretly flooding it with destructive thoughts and feelings. The further one rises up a mountain, the more the atmosphere is rarefied and pure; and the nearer one approaches the peak, the more the perspective becomes vast and imposing. Similarly, there are different levels of consciousness in the Universe, from the highest to the lowest. In the higher mysterious spheres, the Devas (sublime gods) reign, reflecting their divine splendor all around in the form of spiritual light, exalted sentiments, and inspiring artistic accomplishments; while the inferior regions are inhabited by the Asuras (demonic gods), spreading dark influences everywhere. And the human being carries these two extremes hidden in him. If he does not consciously struggle to rise to the superior levels of himself, then the lower aspects of his nature will inevitably dominate and use him without his perceiving it, fruitlessly sapping his vitality. A wise and heedful aspirant will carefully watch over and protect his forces from being stealthily drawn away from him, wasted in negative emotions, futile imaginings, and unprofitable activities. He knows that he needs every drop of his energy for his spiritual struggles, and that economizing that energy is essential for him. However, if, on certain occasions, the aspirant finds himself in a disturbed, restless, or depressed mood, and for some reason or other he is unable to muster the strength to disengage himself from it, then, before this state gathers too much momentum in a downward movement and increases its hold on him, it is better that he leave his room and take up another form of spiritual practice while walking outside—a form of spiritual practice that he should, in any case, always do whenever he happens to be out of doors. Not only will this way of walking use his energies productively on days when his inner state is too difficult to control, but it will also open new avenues for him toward deeper spiritual insights and self-knowledge. The difficulties he will have to cope with in this exercise will help him see better the imperative need to remain in a state of intense self-recollectedness in action also, and not only when quietly meditating behind the walls of a monastery or in his room. Failing this, all his spiritual achievements, no matter how lofty they may be, will not have been put to the test in active life, and he cannot know how he will react or stand up to the unpredictable and fierce winds of the outside world when destiny unexpectedly flings him in their midst. For, even though he may be able to withdraw from outer life for a certain time, sooner or later he will be made to leave the protection of his seclusion and share with an agonizing humanity the fruits of his spiritual harvest—which must not, by divine law, be kept for him alone. This important new exercise mentioned above consists in concentrating all one’s attention on the soles of the feet while walking in the street. Generally, when someone is out walking, he is never present and aware of himself in the manner in which he really should be. He moves about in a state of mental absence, lost in a maze of futile imaginings. So that an aspirant might begin to understand the sense of his existence, and what is required of him by the supreme universal Mind that gave him his breath of life and intelligence, it is at first necessary for him to understand this dramatic problem of the strange state of oblivion in which he passes his life. And he needs every possible bit of help for that. He will be greatly assisted in his efforts at remaining present to himself in this exercise by feeling the soles of his feet each time they touch the ground. In this particular work, concentration on the extremities of the legs will show the aspirant the paramount need there is for him to get away from his head and his habitual thinking so as to permit a new sort of consciousness to arise in him and occupy the place of his ordinary mind. If his lower self does not remove itself—to some degree at least—to make way for something more worthy in him, then this luminous consciousness that he unknowingly carries in the depths of himself cannot come to the foreground of his being sufficiently to make its presence felt. It will be expedient for the aspirant not to venture upon such a difficult and unusual battle without some inner preparations first—otherwise he will either forget to do it most of the time, or he will not have gathered in him the necessary strength and determination to maintain such a delicate struggle. His efforts will consequently be lukewarm and not enough to bring him any positive results. Each time he is thinking of going out, he should inwardly prepare himself, even though it be for only thirty seconds. And, before starting to do this, or any other, spiritual exercise, the aspirant should always first try to feel what is at stake for him at such moments. Instead of letting his mind wander aimlessly in vain reveries, he must make it a habit always to occupy his attention in this important work with the utmost of his sincerity. He should tenaciously continue this particular exercise until he is able, at will, to remain connected inwardly to his higher Source throughout all his outer life activities, until there comes a day when this temporary support will no longer be necessary, or he may need to come back to it only in times of inner difficulty. This special work should not be given up because of the strong resistance the aspirant will encounter in himself at first. As he will notice, the slightest unexpected movement or sound can suddenly distract him from his aim: it may be a passer-by who accidentally jostles him, a fly insisting on settling on his face, or the loud bark of a dog—but, whatever it is, before he realizes what has happened, he is no longer “present”! In the beginning of his struggles to stay present, the seeker will discover that hardly has he taken a few steps than, abruptly, and in an unaccountable manner, he becomes absent and dispersed again, completely forgetting about this important spiritual work and his intention to remain concentrated. Two, or even five, minutes later or longer, he will be just as surprised when, suddenly, as in a flash, there is a strange, inexplicable and very rapid inward movement that takes place in him—the significance of which he may not appreciate nor understand at first—and he has come back to an awareness of himself again! At that very instant, he will realize that, not only had he altogether forgotten about this exercise, but that—what is even more curious—in an incomprehensible way, the knowledge and feeling of his existence had been strangely obliterated at the same time. He was mysteriously swallowed up and—so to speak—“died” in this state of self-forgetfulness! The aspirant must take particular care not to become irritated and intolerant with himself each time he loses the thread of his attention in this manner. He should patiently and persistently begin again with even greater determination, fixing his attention on, and feeling, the soles of his feet as they come down and touch the ground. Through this way of working, he will, among other things, also start to know himself as he is. He will suddenly notice all his hidden, changing, and contradictory sentiments, his unconscious inclinations to criticize, his desires, tensions, restlessness, and many other things that he otherwise could not have known. If the aspirant finds it too difficult to maintain a state of self-recollectedness during this exercise, then he should try aiming from one tree to another (without necessarily looking at them), using the distance that separates them as an additional support while keeping his attention fixed on the soles of his feet. If there are no trees about, then any other object will do. When reaching this landmark, he must immediately aim at another. But he should gradually increase the distance between them every day until he can finally drop this additional prop altogether. It is this mysterious movement toward oneself that the seeker must arrive at clearly perceiving and understanding. However, this comprehension should not come from his intellect but through his feeling and intuition. He will not fail to observe afterward—that is to say, when he recovers the awareness of himself—how, every time this state of self-oblivion descends upon and engulfs him, it is characterized by his being once more lost and identified with the ordinary aspect of his nature made up of endless fantasies, ambitions, frustrations, worries, and impracticable hopes, all of which, like a kaleidoscope, constantly change and replace one another moment by moment. In contrast, every time this sudden inward movement takes place in him, he experiences for a short instant another state of consciousness that does not last long—an unusual, uninvolved state of consciousness that he may miss, or not clearly see in the beginning. This inward movement is so narrow at first, and it happens so quickly, that he may not realize its profound meaning and importance without an enlightened teacher to point it out and expound it to him. Nevertheless, as the aspirant keeps losing and regaining this special awareness of himself, he will, little by little, come to see and understand more and better this strange phenomenon of his “disappearance and reappearance.” He will begin intuitively to perceive particularly what it was he was lost in the moment before, and to what other state of being he is recalled. He will eventually come to realize that each time this strange and inexplicable movement toward himself takes place it is like a rebirth, and whenever there is the contrary movement, going outward and “away” from himself, it is like a death. He will start to discover how he “dies” in his habitual state of oblivion at every instant of his life without seeing it. When later, after long practice, he is able to remain aware of himself for longer periods, he will then begin to live, see, and hear differently. From this impersonal higher aspect of his being, he will begin—in little flashes at first—to see things as they truly are. He will penetrate the feelings of other beings and read mysterious messages in trees, in mountains, and in all other things his eyes happen to settle upon. A human being can live more fully only insofar as he is capable of being present and connected to his Supreme Source—this mysterious, silent, uninvolved Spectator in him. Strength grows when utilized wisely and constructively. As one puts it into use, it will increase and reward its owner with yet more strength—just as when a farmer makes the initial efforts to plow his field and sow some grains of wheat, and it enigmatically brings forth a far greater harvest than was originally planted. If the aspirant can arrive at finding in himself the necessary force to start making the preliminary efforts of remaining present to himself, and begin to live through the higher levels of his consciousness, he will then muster in himself yet more energy to make further efforts and rise to still higher planes of being. In that way, he will, by his own strivings, aid his spiritual growth and transformation—for no one else can make these efforts on his behalf and work for his redemption, just as nobody can take vitality and profit from the food that is eaten and digested by another person. Strength produces more strength when put to use. By working tenaciously for his own enlightenment and salvation, the seeker will find his inner power of concentration and capacity for attention expanding. And this will develop in him intuition, insight, and intelligence of a superior order, which, when put into action, will continue mysteriously to germinate and augment and give birth to further wisdom on a still higher plane. The more one does, the more one will be capable of doing; and the less one does, the less one will be able to do. If, through his perseverance and ardent efforts, the seeker finally attains some degree of enlightenment and realizes the nature of his True Being, then, whenever moments of self-forgetfulness occur and he suddenly “comes back” to himself again (remembering, that is, to turn his look inward to the presence in him of this enigmatic, impartial, and silent “Spectator”), he will invariably find that this mysterious and luminous aspect of his consciousness is always there, ever-glowing and lighting up his being with its effulgence. In fact, it has been there unceasingly and has never at any time abandoned him. If, on certain occasions, he may have thought it was absent, it is only because he himself had turned his gaze away from it, and had forgotten it. After some time the aspirant will be surprised to find on looking back that, paradoxically, even these periods of “forgetfulness” had their place and meaning in the scheme of things to help him rise to the higher planes of his being. For he will not have failed to notice that (apart from the outer problems and pains this self-forgetfulness brings with it), each time he loses the awareness of his existence, and his attention and interest are once more drawn away from him to be wasted in fruitless reveries and activities, he suffers from a terrible emptiness and solitude in the depths of his soul. He will then begin to see clearly that the only moments he is truly conscious of existing, and has a feeling of the fullness of himself, are the moments when his look is once more turned inward toward the light of his higher nature. Afterward, he will find that, whenever he sinks again into his habitual state of oblivion, it will not be a state of such total forgetfulness as before—because, during such moments, he will experience a curious and unaccountable feeling of being ill at ease. If he is sensitive enough to recognize this condition in himself quickly, he can then turn this strange and uncomfortable feeling into yet another means or reminder to disentangle himself from whatever had so uselessly absorbed him, and to turn back forthwith to the awareness of his higher being and true life, dwelling wakefully in the peace of his celestial inner abode.
  21. 4 points
    Waheguru ji ka khala Waheguru ji ki Fateh Veerji, I am putting little on what I know to help u. ((Others please correct me if I am wrong and put ur inputs)) The Bani Ath Chandi Charitar Ustat Barnan is a part of morning Nitnem for 'Budha Dal Sikhs'. Here 'Ath' means now and the Bani is mainly praise of the Chandi Charitar path. It marks the importance of why we should do 'Chandi Charitar'. The last stanza is also included in 'Hazoori Rehraas Sahib " Chandi Charitar Ustat Barnan" is sung daily when U do Chandi Charitr Paths occasionally as here Guru Sahib have told various attributes of Chandi. He has made it clear in this ustat barnan that Chandi is not a Human(lady) or not some deity but it is formless and is willpower (Shakti) of human brain under the hukam of Parbrahm These Banis are very powerful. If done regularly they are capable of providing anything you can ask for. ((Jaap Sahib still remains on top though and is highly recommended before any Dasam Bani)) Maryaada is same as Chandi di Vaar i.e avoid in the evening hours or continue for the whole night. And proper hygiene etc
  22. 4 points
    Jageera

    Anger after Paath

    2nd update.There is improvement.Anger still comes almost everyday but I manage to do nothing and wait it out.Found a good tip by veer Bhagat Singh in the Meditation thread where he says to analyze the anger,its source,where I feel it in my body etc when it happens.It comes from the stomach area and spreads all over the torso.My mind starts making up stories and scenarios that fuel the anger.I start imagining scenarios that haven't happened and might never happen and this adds to the anger.It is like my mind provokes me to be angry and miserable and then laughs at me when I do get angry.So I just sit and endure the never ending thoughts and scenarios until I start thinking about something else.I try to chant Gurmantar to replace the thoughts but I seem to fail more often than not.The heat inside can be felt almost the whole day.I just try my best not to react to it.I have also been practicing the subtle art of keeping my mouth shut and so far the results have been forthcoming.I also suggest to myself that I should not make others around me miserable just because I am. Can't say much about the salt foot soak as I tried 3 tablespoons for a couple of days and ran out of H.salt.Have yet to buy more so can't update much on this. I do the breathing simran after JapjiSahib and Benti Chaupai daily.Usually lasts 5 to 15 minutes.Today I sat for 2-3 minutes and just got up and walked out of the room.I notice every time I try to do simran I start thinking I have something else important to do when I don't have anything else to do at that moment.I try to keep on breathing and saying Waheguru in my head as long as I can.Then I just start verbally reciting Gurmantar for a few minutes and end the session.I am going to have a shower and try doing simran again in a while.The good news is the days I manage to do simran properly for 15minutes I feel calm and content.Less negative thoughts. Will update again in a couple of weeks.
  23. 4 points
    Jageera

    Battling Addiction with Gurbani

    Just an update.Today marks 100 days since I quit Alcohol and Cigarettes.Still think about it once in a while but the strong urges have gone. Social life took a hit as I rarely go out any longer but no problem.It is better this way.Now is a time I get to know who my real friends are. Been doing daily some Mool mantar jaap,Japji Sahib,Chaupai Sahib,some breathing simran and I believe it is powering me to carry on. I will update again here in another 100 days.Thanks to all members here who helped me in this journey to clean up my act.
  24. 3 points
    Mooorakh

    I wish to take Amrit

    In my quest towards Amrit.. I came across two extremes.. Pls pour in your ( source Gurmat Rehat Maryaada - Damdami Taksaal front pg uploaded) Vs  ( source http://www.sikhnet.com/news/i-miss-good-ol-days-1) I remember my own ‘amrit sanchar’ very well. Bapu Ji took me to see Baba Sohan Singh Ji to discuss amrit as I had felt I was not ready for it. I was 15 and a favourite of Baba Ji as I did kirtan and accompanied Baba Ji and Bapu Ji on numerous occasions. The conversation went something like this. Baba Ji: Beta, your Bapu Ji tells me that you feel you are not ready for ‘amrit’ Me: Baba Ji, I will not be able to handle all the expectations of ‘amrit’ just yet. Baba Ji: Chal beta. Let us go through all your apprehensions. Me: I will not be able to do all the Nitnem banis expected of me. Baba Ji: Can you do JapJi in the morning, Rehras at dusk and Sohila at night? Me: I already do those. Baba Ji: Well, we have no problem. As time goes by add Jaap Sahib and Sawayiyay as Nitnem. Occasionally do the full Anand Sahib. In fact you will find that doing Sukhmani Sahib occasionally is also very uplifting. It will help you in your studies and even in your sports! Can we agree on that? Me: yes, Baba Ji. Baba Ji: You know what is expected of you and let me assure you that you will get supreme bliss and a sense of well-being every time you do all the banis! Next? Me: Baba Ji, 5 kekar. I cannot keep all 5 kekar on my person all the time. I love my sports and cannot be lugging around a kirpan, a kachhera and even a kanga in my hair. In fact when I play hockey, I am even expected to take my kara off as it can hurt an opponent. Baba Ji: Beta, I have one important question for you. Do you have intentions of cutting your hair into the future? Me: (I was shocked at even being asked that). No Baba Ji, I shall always keep my hair. I am proud to be a Sikh! Baba Ji: (Smiling, seeing the look of shock on my face.) Then Beta, we have no problems. The other kekars are man-made. They can come off and on as required. They are loving gifts from you bapu – Guru Gobind Singh Ji. Treasure them. Keep them. In fact learn how to wield a kirpan for defence and learn self-defence. Treasure your kachhera – do not go chasing after loose women or any woman for that matter. Wear the kara as your ornament from Guru Ji. Does that answer your question? Me: Yes Baba Ji! But Baba Ji, I play team sports where I am expected to share drinks with other players. What about ‘jooth’? Baba Ji: Not a problem. Let me explain something about amrit, beta. Amrit once taken is not easily broken. Once your pita, dhan dhan Guru Gobind Singh Ji Maharaj takes you by the arm, he does not easily give you up! Amrit only breaks if you commit a heinous sin including cutting your hair, engaging in extra-marital sex, eating halaal meat or consuming tobacco – the four ‘bejer-kurahits’. You will come up short many times as you are a human being. But all you have to do is realise your shortcoming, pick yourself up, ask for forgiveness from your father and move on in life. THAT IS AMRIT. Amrit is to give you a sense of belonging – belonging to the family of Guru Gobind Singh. If you want to be part of that family, then take amrit. It is as simple as that. I saw no possible reason not to partake of amrit. It was more about partaking of it and working with it rather than working at it first and then partaking of it when one felt ready. Let me assure you, I believe 95 percent of youngsters or just Sikhs who would otherwise take amrit will never ever feel ‘ready’ to partake of it. IF I HAD BEEN GIVEN A CHOICE BY SANT BABA SOHAN SINGH JI, I THINK I WOULD NEVER HAVE GOT AROUND TO PARTAKING OF AMRIT. He made the partaking of amrit feel like a rite of passage into adulthood rather than an option of getting into a rigid code of conduct for the rest of my life. Yes, I have fallen short many times but I have never felt that it has ever been broken. I belong to the family of Guru Gobind Singh Ji Maharaj.
  25. 3 points
    Importance of taking Hakumnama, cannot be emphasized enough! Satguru speaks to everyone from its illahi bani, this is clear as a light in taking Hakumnama, lets quickly contemplate what happens- Gyani ji, individual and sangat do ardas infront of maharaj, then gyani ji sits on tabia with clear Awareness of maharaj saroop, he/she via clear awareness without mental noise, preconditioning or thought, pre conceived notions or emotions turns very effortlessly and spontaneously picks up and read ang arbitrarily. At that moment - its jagad jot- supreme awareness(supreme atma) of sri guru granth sahib ji helps jot-jiv atma to pick up and read ang of satguru maharaj for mass sangat, individual and guide them accordingly. This is miracle in itself - this is my freinds pure evident divine at play where supreme awareness-JOT works and operates very freely in a very clear pristine way via mere mortals and provide them with direct answers, insights, epiphanies, revelations-guidance for mass sangat or customized for individual. This is really helpful for everyone, especially for seekers with this guidance of hakumnama- it makes them more receptive towards outer and inner Satguru and makes them more introverted in the path and gets them out of conceptual sand box of egoic mind/mental noise. Small clip from bhai sukha singh:
  26. 3 points
    akali dilsidak singh

    Suraj Kavach Astotar

    this whole paath is done on the day of diwali . amritwele is baani da jaap krna hai .and before diwali bhawani ustat paath is done .maryada's katha has been posted in this thread.
  27. 3 points
    akali dilsidak singh

    Suraj Kavach Astotar

    diwali mahatam paath from sri sarbloh granth pdf shri sarbloh mangal.pdf
  28. 3 points
    Probably they have Intentionally not included those who have answered correctly... how's this possible that NOT ONE person knows about the real history?
  29. 3 points
    Exactly. They studied at western institutions that are infiltrated with leftists and their degenerate ideologies that seek to bring down every Religion as only a feel good,self help,be a better person,be good to everyone,club void of any spirituality,mysticism or divinity.You speak against them and you will be accused of "Hate". At the very basic of their problem is the 'Kala Engrej' mentality. These are sufferers of 'Internalized Racism'. They look up at the more successful races who have destroyed and liberalized their own religion and wish they were like them at the same time kicking and oppressing their own race to show their masters that they are somewhat better than the rest and have 'evolved'.These are very dangerous people that I predict one would contribute in a major Genocide against Sikhs. Their arrogance and internalized racism will reach a point where they will decide to provoke violence against Mainstream Sikhs to wipe us out and leave only them.You can already see their minions spewing extreme hate all over the internet.
  30. 3 points
    The Rt Hon Doctor karminder dhillon PHD Boston then writes: "The shabd is wholly spiritual. It uses multiple metaphors – marriage, junj, joree, daan, mighty human beings, power full beings etc etc. Guru ji also used IDIOMS. We need to understand the context of these metaphors and get to the spiritual messages. That is how we interpreted the entire Shabd as above. This particular verse is NO EXCEPTION. In English we may say SCORES come and DOZENS go. One score is 20. And one dozen is 12. This means whatever is being referred to comes and goes APLENTY. IT DOES NOT mean someone particular came in 1820 and went in 1912!!!! In our everyday language we say SAU AIYE TEY SAU GAYEY. SAU is one hundred. Or TEREY VARGEY KAYEE HAZAAR DEKHEY. Or TEREY VARGEY CHATEE (36) AIYEY. These numbers are used idiomatically to portray unspecific multitudes. The shabd uses the numbers BOTH idiomatically to portray MULTITIDES and poetically to be within the poetic confines of the verses before and after. ਆਵਨਿ ਅਠਤਰੈ ਜਾਨਿ ਸਤਾਨਵੈ ਹੋਰੁ ਭੀ ਉਠਸੀ ਮਰਦ ਕਾ ਚੇਲਾ ॥ Avan Athathrey Jaan Satanvey Hor Bhee Uthsee Marad Ka Chela. Avan – Coming. Athathrey – 78, metaphor for unspecified multiples. Jaan – Goes. Satanvey – 97; metaphor for unspecific multiples. Hor – More, Many, Others. Bhee – Also. Uthsee – Raise, Come to the forefront. Marad – Male, Masculine. Chela – Disciple, Follower, Believer, Worshipper. Unspecified Multiples Will Come and Multiple More Will Depart as Worshippers of Masculine Prowess. (Yet the Hukm of the Creator Will Remain as Permanent). " To me, this just sums up the clutching of straws to build up a straw man argument. Using a specific non rounded number is NOT part of everyday talk. We use, and indeed Gurbani uses numbers like a hundred, thousands, and lakhs etc. But it never uses numbers like 78, 97, 146, 2685, 743872 etc. Using rounded numbers to portray a particular aspect or point is normal in any language. But to try and use "78" and "97" for unspecified numbers is just nonsensical. But those rats like that admin aman on SPN live for this kind of nonsense. The great doctor then ends with some of his musings on what gurbani should be with : "COMMENT ON THE NOTION OF SARAB SANJHEE BANEE. When we say Gurbanee is NEVER occasion, location, time or person specific – we are saying the messages are NOT meant for a particular location, occasion, time or individual. We are saying ALL of Gurbani is meant for ALL of humanity for ALL times." Again this is not bourne out by the inclusion of Ramkali Sadd. Although there is great teachings in that shabad for the benefit of humankind, there is no denying that the writing was an occasion and person specific event. I wonder why it is, that these PHD's and ilk feel that there is a need to distort each and every aspect of Gurmat to their own particular thoughts. We had Angy on here some months ago doing it, and they have no shame in doing it.
  31. 3 points
    Soulfinder

    Suraj Kavach Astotar

    Here is a app i found for Sri Sarbloh Granth Sahib Ji on google app store. Here is the screenshot i took
  32. 3 points
    akali dilsidak singh

    Suraj Kavach Astotar

    Here i m posting some pictures of the gutka sahib
  33. 3 points
    Well, Bhai ji hit the nail on the head that we have to look more closely at SGGS ji, DG and Bhai Gurdas's Vaars as well as puratan ithihaasic texts. The whole problem with the 'protestant' infiltration stemmed from colonialism and we have to take all that was written from that period VERY VERY carefully as a consequence, especially when it comes from sources that had accepted brit hegemony in the area. And a big part of that will involve textually criticising the literature produced during the Singh Sabha lehar which people are loathe to do. I think ground level strength is very important - we are already quite a prosperous and educated community in the UK, but get abused by lesser educated and poorer people because of their street level strength. Then we need to overcome the whole chaaploose mentality towards goray politically. We should learn that going to them for issues like 1984, Free Jaggi etc. is wasting our time and making us look weak and dumb. I think all the political games played during colonialism actually plays a big part in the stupid moves at politics by apnay we see in the UK. So questioning the past (colonial period) is directly related to freeing minds for the future - if that makes sense.
  34. 3 points
    my 2 cents, do the Paath after the morning Nitnem Banis. You would yourself get the feeling of the time best suitable to you. Also you will also feel tphat the Bani has to be followed by additional Banis as per one's energy. I myself have wasted a lot of time over the timings and so on, Bani will never harm you as we all know. At this time you or me or anyone who doesnt have any awastha is a abhyasi - a student . We are bound to make mistakes while learning . So lets just assume we are toddlers who will fall time and again while walking. My personal experience says , Hukumae Andar Sabko - you will get the message inside. Just have the sraddha and pyaar, rest will all come.
  35. 3 points
    But after ur Nitnem ofcourse. Rather be sure.if u can handle the powers ... .. Else go for Jaap Sahibs or Chaupai Sahib instead And no need for apologies, we are all Sangi Sakhi'-s here .. so even more than friends. ... Cheers to ur curiosity!! @Soulfinder Veerji. Hanji. I am aware that u do Dasam Banis and love them. I do to and I have put in the caution more than once in the post above, that ridh siddh is NOT sikhi. It brings negative powers. One thing that i perceive is I take Bhagauti as the motherly form of Akaal Purakh. As Guru Sahib says " Namo Sri Bhagauti..." And Pratham Bhagauti than Guru Nanak that is he himself. So how can be my mom dangerous and bring damage to me?? 'Gobind bhaav Bhagat ka bhooka' so feelings,love and kirpa holds higher place than jap, tap sanjam right? And similarly 'shaheed Singhs are the part of a family. Like our brothers so where's the danger ? I mean that's how it looks to me personally
  36. 3 points
    Sat Sri Akal ji, First things first- nobody here on the forum would ever lecture u to discourage u from reading Bani. We all are here cos we gain from here .. lose nothing. But u seem to be in hurry and seem to have a short temper too. That's NOT a trait of 'Sant Sipahi' . I am sorry to say but if that's the attitude may have to go for 10 crore Jap's instead of 10 lakhs to sidh Shastra Naam Mala or may be more to please GURU SAHIB. Cos the ultimate name of the game is 'Kirpa'. Be- aware that the First word is SANT the second is Sipahi'. Anyway 'no lecturer' as u don't like them So the Maryada is same for all Dasam Banis - Kesi Snaan. Clean clothes ( better hygiene) Degh( pure) and if u know about Shaheedi Degh - the better. Jot Water Kalash Pure Aasan Scented room( more organic the better-non alcoholic perfumes are a plus) If u sitting in front of Guru Sahib then that's best. Else Set up Sarabloh Shastras on a high platform with all respect ((yeh hamaare Peer)) and alongwith the Bani/ Pothhi ((Pothhi Parmesan Da thhaan)) but yes if u wish to siddh the baani be ready to bear the power as it comes with lots of responsibilities and put lot EXTRA efforts- though caution again - " ridh sidh awra saad- it brings negative powers - ego/pride/ anger etc too" Go through these videos before u start. All the Best Waheguru ji ka Khalsa Waheguru ji ki FATEH And part 2 of this video.
  37. 3 points
    The loss and recovery of self-consciousness that occurs during the aspirants spiritual practices is probably the fastest means to allow him one day to recognise, through direct inner vision, the Celestial Aspect of his double nature. This the reason why he must not at any moment become irritated or feel guilty when this very particular recovery of consciousness arises suddenly within him and he notices that he was once more Absent to himself the moment before. He must, on the contrary, welcome it with an intense, reverential respect, as he may not realise at the beginning that these recoveries of consciousness that arise so mysteriously within him are, infact calls coming from the Superior Aspect of his being. I recalled the pangti below as I read the above paragraph. Mere man paradhesee ve, piaare aau ghare || O my dear beloved stranger mind, please come home! har guroo milaavahu mere piaare ghar vasai hare || Meet with the Lord-Guru, O my dear beloved, and He will dwell in the home of your self. Ang 451 A serious aspirant cannot fail to realize that, just as an activity that is dear to him and that he must carry out in his diurnal state can no longer be accomplished once he is carried away into his nocturnal sleep, in the same way, the work of consolidating within him this Enigmatic Inner Awakening, which proves to be of the greatest importance to him, can no longer be undertaken when he has been carried away by death. This very particular inner work must be undertaken in his lifetime; after death, it will be too late, because the conditions necessary to the accomplishment of this immense task will no longer exist for him. In order to be able to conserve a minimum of inner presence in the movement of active life (which constitutes the primary condition to succeeding one day in consolidating within oneself this desired state of inner Awakening), it is necessary for the seeker to renounce what he is habitually, to renounce the entire accumulation of his futile dreams, his inner chatter, which is devoid of interest, his unprofitable imaginings, his negative thoughts (which, paradoxically, prove the most difficult to abandon), and so on. However, if he has not made this renunciation during his meditation, it will be almost impossible for him to put it into practice in his everyday life.
  38. 3 points
    jaikaara

    Simran help needed!

    you said it ! It is Waheguruji who has given that boon of progeny to the woman. Why would Waheguru want women to stop remembering Naam. Of what i heard that sounds logical, those days there were no sanitary pads. The level of hygiene was obviously not as good as now. Periods are accompanied with cramps and severe bleeding in many women thus giving a feeling of weakness and fatigue. The system of 'resting' during those days gave women a small vacation and other family members would take over. However, to make things understandable specially to men who at times would force women for their urges, the word 'sin/paap' has got attached. This word did act like a red signal, allowing women to rest. As time progressed this rule did act as a hindrance too.
  39. 3 points
    Jageera

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Happy Vasakhi to all members and admin of Sikhawareness.
  40. 3 points
    mahanpaapi

    Happy Vasakhi 2019

    Many many Maharaj Ji's Blessings to all.
  41. 3 points
    Sat1176

    What is Self?

    As things generally stand in life, the human being is not, and cannot be, aware of the Divine he carries in him. This silent “Spectator,” this Celestial Consciousness and most faithful friend he has—which is the essence of his being, animating and giving meaning to his life, as well as to the lives of all other human beings, no matter what their race or creed—will remain mysteriously hidden from his inner vision unless it is consciously sought for and he arrives (as a result of the unremitting efforts and time he devotes to its quest) at recognizing it fully through immersing himself in it during his meditation, a state that must later extend itself little by little into his active life as well. Unless a human being has truly known the Sublime in himself through direct inner experience, his conviction in the existence of a higher power, no matter how strong it may be, will (apart from perhaps succeeding in sustaining him a little in moments of adversity and helping make him a somewhat better person than he would otherwise have been) continue to be no more than a mere belief. When looked at from another perspective, taking into account the higher purpose of his incarnate existence, this is far from sufficient to help him know himself in such a way as will leave no shadow of a doubt in him regarding his True Identity, and what he will be reabsorbed into when his time comes to bid farewell to his earthly life and all that he has known during his brief and tumultuous sojourn on this globe. His faith in the existence of a Supreme Power somewhere in the Universe far away from him, though it be very profound and sincere, while it remains just a blind and almost abstract belief, associated with all sorts of conscious or unconscious imaginings about the Sacred, will not only bear no resemblance to the reality, but will also always carry in it the baneful seed of separateness and difference from others—leading to passionate divergences of opinion among the diverse peoples of the world on the nature of this divine power and to the interminable religious quarrels that ensue from such unverified beliefs. Between the higher aspect of a person’s being and his ordinary self is a mysterious, highly fragile, and intangible element—his attention. To whichever side of his double nature his attention is attracted and gravitates, it will, knowingly or unknowingly, immediately start animating and nurturing it—and there he will also inevitably be! Through this quasi–irresistible attraction of gravity that is the strange characteristic of terrestrial existence, the human being’s attention, unless sufficiently constrained to the contrary by the hard blows of outer life, is mainly unconsciously drawn in the direction of least resistance in him, demanding no effort from him to achieve or to maintain. There is no value at all in continuously yielding to this “vegetating” state of inner sleep, as a person generally does, and in unquestioningly conceding to the ever-changing whims and wishful dreaming that keep arising in him—much of which, if viewed objectively, will be found to be impractical and absurd. One does not need to exercise strength of will, be audacious, or possess any talent whatsoever to follow the same drift and path as those of the masses in general. Anyone can accomplish such universal and easy exploits. But the moment that an aspirant decides consciously to alter the habitual direction of the flow of his energies and exert himself to proceed, as it were, upward against this descending force of attraction, then he will immediately encounter strong resistance, both in himself and from outside. He will suddenly become aware, on the one hand, of these inner and outer oppositions, and on the other, of a certain inner awakening that these resistances provoke in him (and the value of which he may not recognize or not sufficiently appreciate at first). In fact, his hope of rousing himself from the ease of mesmeric sleep—this mysterious inner sleep in which most people are tamely content to spend their lives without questioning it—lies in these very challenges that he will come up against inside and outside himself. Just as a fire is ignited through the continual rubbing together of two pieces of wood, so these resistances that a seeker will keep meeting with in himself and in life will serve to create in him the indispensable friction that he needs and without which a living spiritual flame cannot be kindled. That is the reason why they must be viewed with the right attitude and understanding, and not blindly regarded as being extremely irritating and valueless obstacles. The seeker’s regard must start turning inward instead of outward, and this will undeniably demand from him much conscious effort in the beginning, as well as the hard-won inner strength and will to keep redirecting his attention back onto its intended track each time it wanders away from it, until one day he arrives at discerning the miracle of his Supreme Being, this sublime consciousness that has all the time been there, secretly watching him and waiting for him to reverse the direction of his gaze in order to discover it and behold its ineffable beauty, filling him with the inexpressible happiness he has mistakenly been searching for outside himself all the time.
  42. 3 points
    I've been left speechless reading the following. May Waheguru bless us all with such bhagti. MUST READ SANGAT JI. Sadhana and Enlightenment (Part One) All the laws of logic and the understanding the human being generally has of the Universe and life dictate that it is inconceivable for him to be able to contemplate his physical self without the aid of some external instrument such as a mirror, a piece of metal, a clear pond, and so on. As to the contemplation of one’s inner or spiritual self, this would normally be considered to be not only totally impossible but even grossly illogical and ludicrous. However, an enlightened being knows, through direct personal experience, that during deep meditation, as one rises to higher planes of consciousness, one attains to other dimensions where the ordinarily inconceivable act of the contemplation of one’s incorporeal Self does indeed become miraculously possible, albeit in a manner wholly inexplicable and incomprehensible to the rational mind. This extraordinary state can be experienced only from deep within and is perceived as a vast and transparent Self without form, spreading out in all directions beyond the physical frame into infinity, a mysterious and formless “Spectator” plunged in silent Self- contemplation. Like a limitless ocean of consciousness without beginning or end, this invisible Self, although formless, has a reality about it that is immeasurably greater than one’s tangible earthly body. Indeed, compared to this unusual state of being, the physical form loses all reality. In this sacred state, the contemplator, the contemplated, and the contemplation are all three united in one. It is a very mysterious and inexplicable act, in which, paradoxically, there is contemplation of the Self at the same time as being the Self that is contemplated. While merged in it, one has the strange feeling of going back into Eternity to one’s Supreme Source. One is pervaded with a sensation of indescribable purity, as well as a blissful feeling of vast “cosmic aloneness” and profound inner peace, surpassing anything one can know of in one’s habitual outer existence. Something of this unusual and beatific state must start to accompany the seeker when occupied in his daily work as well. At first, this will demand from him very delicate and repeated efforts of inner presence while simultaneously abandoning himself to the Sublime in him. Through the patient repetition of these subtle efforts, he will help create the necessary conditions for the transformation of himself, ultimately allowing his higher nature to occupy its rightful place in the celestial city of his being and rule through him. He will thus become a channel for the fulfillment of the Divine Will in himself and on the lower planes of existence. In carrying over this effulgent flame to the somber regions of his nature and to where there is the greatest need for it, he will, through the higher understanding he has so painstakingly acquired, show the way to alleviate the suffering of a forlorn and despairing humanity. After having found this light in himself, the aspirant may at first want only to retire into the quietness and felicity of his inner being, refusing all else. Intoxicated with this celestial wine, he may be tempted to wish solely to lose himself in this beatific state, rejecting the outer world altogether— an outer world that, by comparison, will now seem so crude and dissonant. He will be like a man deeply in love, having found a woman whose extraordinary beauty is beyond anything he could have ever dreamed of before, neglecting everything in life so as to be with her all the time. He may even believe that he has attained all there is to attain and know, and that there is nothing more for him to do but remain tranquil in this heavenly abode or Nirvana that he has, through much effort, deservedly earned. But, alas, it is not so easy as all that. As said earlier, enlightenment does not necessarily mean liberation. It should also not be forgotten that there are different degrees of enlightenment. For the great majority of seekers, enlightenment (if it did take place in them) signifies purely the start of this arduous journey toward their emancipation. Only outer life can provide the conditions the human being requires through which he can learn to know himself better, to find courage in the face of repeated adversities or defeats, not to hate when being wronged, not to take what rightly belongs to another, not to cause suffering around him in satisfying a transitory desire, not to behave dishonorably toward another for selfish reasons, and so on. Enlightenment is but the outset of real sadhana. It is the start of a lifetime’s work and study. For one must not forget where one has started from: one’s untransformed tendencies, as well as one’s sexual urges and other needs, will again and again raise their hungry heads and plague one. Even if a seeker decides to shut himself away from the world completely, he will find that, sooner or later, unless he is one of the rare exceptions, he will be forced out of his retreat, both to satisfy the exigencies of his various wants and by the necessity for him to put his spiritual work into practice in active life also. As in all domains, the right balance must be found between meditation and active life to permit true and healthy spiritual growth to take place. One needs to breathe in in order to breathe out, but one must also breathe out in order to be able to breathe in again. In spite of all the unusual spiritual experiences he may have had, the aspirant will have to face the hard fact that he is still an incomplete being, full of hidden undesirable tendencies, lacking in will and inner strength, and as yet unworthy to serve in a befitting manner. Even if at this stage he tries to impart to others whatever higher knowledge he may have gained, the latter risks being mixed up with inaccuracies, spiritual pride, and sometimes even salted and peppered with a little fantasy born of the concealed desire to appear important in other people’s eyes. If, after having known the luminous aspect of his being, an aspirant cannot raise in himself the strong and sincere wish to know the dark side of his nature as well— perhaps thinking that because of the lofty spiritual experiences he has had, this is no longer important— then he will render his emancipation very uncertain, if not impracticable. The discovery of the Sublime in oneself does not mean the immediate release from the bondage to one’s inferior nature. This divine light must not be misused solely in wanting to withdraw into the bliss of its celestial oasis. It could unconsciously remain a mere desire to escape into higher states only, which— because of one’s level of being— will not in any case last very long before weakening and becoming diluted with one’s ordinary state of consciousness, finally receding into the background, leaving one desolate again in the aridity of one’s habitual state. If, without really understanding what it involves, a seeker remains as he is, then each time he tries to touch these higher states again, they will last for short periods only, and without his realizing why, he will find himself continually flung back to the level that corresponds to his degree of evolution. If the aspirant cannot muster in himself the inner courage patiently to face and suffer again and again the truth of what he is in himself, with all his open or hidden negativities, ill will, conceit, laziness, instability, stupidity, unreliability, and so on, then his sadhana will not have fulfilled its true function for his transformation. It will simply remain a high- sounding word in his mouth, empty and unproductive, like a seed fallen on poor soil. He may not realize it at first, but, each time he can see himself as he is, a mysterious alchemy takes place in him, creating the right and probably only condition for his transformation. Although he will sometimes discover very distasteful things about himself, he must be careful not to brood negatively on them, forgetting the light that is eternally shining there behind them and through which they were seen. Part Two Without the aspirant reaching some degree of enlightenment, the real practice of sadhana cannot begin. He will not understand what this work is about and what is ultimately at stake for him. He will simply remain a prisoner of fantastic ideas and imaginings on spirituality arising from his ordinary self, containing no truth in them whatever. At the most, his concepts will be no more than a collection of intellectual speculations on the enigma of one’s being and existence— perhaps made with much good intention but having no foundation in nor any bearing on reality. In the end, all this will lead nowhere; it will certainly not bring him any nearer to the realization of his True Nature and to a correct comprehension of the hidden meaning behind life and death. Although it is absolutely right that the aspirant at first strive after enlightenment, it is also extremely important for him to understand that, paradoxically, he must under no circumstances do his spiritual practice with either the conscious or unconscious intention of obtaining results. Whatever the subject of his meditation, whether concentration on the lower abdomen while breathing, concentration on the mystical sound inside his ears, concentration on his feet in the slow walking exercise, concentration on a certain chakra (psychic center) situated between the nose and upper lip, he must be very careful not to seek unusual phenomena, even perhaps unknowingly, nor to be constantly on the lookout for results, nor project his imagination in advance of what he thinks illumination might be. All these things will certainly hinder him in his endeavors, which will continuously be colored by the desires and fantasies of his ordinary self, interfering instead of getting out of the way. The aspirant must learn, especially at the beginning of his practice, to concentrate on the subject of his meditation for the love of doing it and for no other reason. Generally, when meditating, the majority of people lose patience without being aware of it and relax the intensity of their concentration just at the very moment when they should more than ever be keeping it up and plunging ever deeper into themselves. Thus, they are never able to pass beyond a certain threshold in their being. But this should not be misunderstood. It is not at all meant as an incitement to be brutal in one’s endeavors, using violence in such sacred work— sacred work that, on the contrary, demands a most delicate approach and subtle understanding. Although it is true that one’s effort must be very firm and sustained, at the same time— as was repeatedly said earlier— it has to be extremely gentle and tranquil, accompanied by the simultaneous surrendering of oneself. The essential thing in meditation is to arrive at experiencing and recognizing with absolute certainty this sublime consciousness in oneself, this subtle, vast, and luminous consciousness that each being unknowingly carries deep within him. There are different paths to arrive at this supreme realization, and under the guidance of a master, this revelation can be attained either rapidly or progressively— depending on how ripe and ready the seeker is for it. But if an aspirant is striving without a guide, he may abruptly touch unusual states or go through exceptionally powerful experiences ordinarily absolutely inconceivable, which may later perturb him if he is not sufficiently prepared for them. It is to avoid any unnecessary shock for someone working alone, as well as to help him better understand his own spiritual experiences, that the following personal experience is recounted— fully realizing that this does not in any way imply everyone will pass through exactly the same states in exactly the same manner to arrive at a comprehension of his True Being. It is told simply to help him should he experience something similar. One day, after having gone through the most terrible suffering and despair, as the author was meditating, and as he kept plunging ever more deeply into himself, stubbornly holding onto the subject of his meditation with growing but quiet determination while at the same time constantly increasing the intensity and strength of his concentration without at any moment letting it falter or fluctuate, abruptly, as the sensation of his body became ever finer and more rarefied, this sacred Nada inside his ears started to vibrate in a most unusual way, thundering in his head with an incredible power and shrillness he had not known before. Suddenly, with a formidable force and astonishing rapidity, he was sucked up to the top of his skull. At the same time, he felt that his forehead had ripped open from inside, and the vision of his two eyes had inwardly merged into the center of his forehead. Simultaneously, he had the strong and strange feeling of having died and gone back to his Source of origin. He was also seized with the inexpressible sensation that he was immersed in and united with the Great Whole, and that he had discovered and understood the mysterious secret behind life, the stars, and the Universe. He was equally pervaded with an extraordinary sense of immense “cosmic aloneness.” An eternal vast silence reigned. Afterward, and for many days, his body seemed incredibly light and free, as if transmuted into ether. Something of this sensation has remained with him ever since. He also experienced a strange and indefinable state of well- being, bathed in an ineffable inner stillness, contentment, and indescribable feeling of love hitherto unknown to him, a profound melting tenderness in the solar plexus— as that of a speechless mother who, after many years of painful separation and suffering, has been unexpectedly reunited with her only child whom she long thought lost. Later, as he tried to formulate into words the strange secret he had discovered concerning life, the stars, and the Universe, he found himself utterly unable to do so. Although the reality of this mysterious comprehension has always stayed with him from that day onward, yet he has never been able to translate it to himself in any known language. He has also found it necessary to keep largely silent on such out- of- the- ordinary matters. These are intimate experiences between the Divine and oneself that cannot be shared with anyone else. Moreover, through this unusual spiritual experience, he had, without having fully understood it at first, received a foretaste and subtle knowledge of the after- death state, a subtle knowledge and higher understanding that have kept silently growing in him, becoming ever clearer, deeper, and more affirmative each time he sat and meditated again. Here also, he deemed it absolutely necessary and expedient never to speak about such a revelation to anyone. Apart from the reasons already mentioned, his silence is also to avoid wrong ideas about the supernatural from arising in the minds of people who might later desecrate a thing of such weighty importance, distorting it in reducing it to their own level of understanding. From that momentous day onward, his existence took an entirely different meaning for him. His thoughts and feelings flowed in a new direction, and his aims in life changed drastically. He looked upon everything from another perspective and in a totally new light. All the things that used to interest him in the past, and that had seemed so important before, suddenly meant nothing to him anymore. He began to see in everyone, without exception, the same Cosmic Consciousness animating their lives, only they are ignorant of it. It is crucified in them and will sadly remain so until they bring themselves to desire it above all else and succeed in making the necessary efforts to seek and discover it— a discovery that will bring in its wake a very particular understanding of the reason and sense of their lives, of where they originated, and into what they will one day be reabsorbed when this form of existence comes to its end for them, as it inevitably will do. Through this inner awakening, or rebirth, they will then start to live in, and through, the higher aspect of their nature, conscious of the supreme Unity behind all sentient beings and the seeming separateness of things. He equally saw the imperative need to strive to maintain as far as possible a state of self- recollectedness in active life as well. This ever- so subtle inward movement, or rather descent into oneself— which has to be continually renewed— is the key to the understanding of real inner presence. This inner descending movement is, in a certain way, always possible to accomplish, and one will find that, at the very instant when this descent into oneself is effected, the renunciation of one’s ordinary state of being mysteriously takes place at the same time. Later, other strange phenomena occurred during the author’s meditation: sometimes he was seized with a mysterious involuntary shaking of the entire trunk or the head, while at other times a gentle unintentional swaying of the body took place, all of which could last for a considerable length of time before stopping; on other occasions, he felt a strong and pleasant pressure on the top of the skull, at the back of the head, or in the region of the throat with the chin involuntarily pressing tightly against the neck— similar to the Jalandhara pose in Hatha Yoga. At other times, the whole of his abdomen would, of itself, extend outward and rise in a surprising manner, pressing against the solar plexus with considerable force. It would remain in this distended and suspended position for quite a long time— inconceivable in normal conditions. Now and then, he would feel himself taken by an invisible force and, in spite of himself, made to dance in his room in a most strange and ecstatic way while the strains of celestial music vibrated throughout his being. This strange sensation of the opening of the center of his forehead from inside has never left the author. Since the day it occurred it is as if, in some mysterious way, he is always looking out at the world deep from the back of his head at the same time as through the center of his forehead and his physical eyes. His experience also led him to the discovery that he could, through the power of Grace, confer upon another a direct silent transmission. Although this will without doubt be of inestimable help to a seeker, it will, nevertheless, not spare him his share of the efforts that he will have to make throughout his entire life. Part Three When the aspirant has arrived at experiencing and recognizing this out- of- the- ordinary state of consciousness in him as being his Supreme Nature, appreciating its capital value and profound importance for his transformation, he will come to see for himself the urgent need for him to always strive to turn to it, not only during the moments when he sits quietly and meditates but in his active life as well. For he will find that while he is inwardly present to this higher aspect of his being, he cannot any more conduct himself under its intransigent gaze in the same way as he does when in his ordinary state of being. All the things that he generally thinks, says, and does when sunk in the habitual condition of unmindfulness are inconceivable in a state of self- recollectedness. He will perceive that, as long as he is aware of himself, inwardly connected to his Supreme Being, he will not be able to do other than act in conformity to this hallowed Witness. His thoughts, speech, and actions will inevitably be influenced and governed by a higher knowledge and very particular understanding proceeding from it, rendering him compassionate in his contact with the outer world and conscious of the feelings, problems, and sufferings of others. And he will discover that, as soon as he forgets himself again, becoming inwardly disconnected from his True Source, he will start once more to behave through his ordinary lower self, with all its blind urges for the immediate relief of its discomforts, as well as the gratification of its ever- changing cravings and ambitions, oblivious of the consequences of its actions and the unhappiness it inflicts around it, its personal satisfaction being the only thing it knows and cares for. When the seeker is identified with this side of his nature, he generally, knowingly or not, approaches others solely through his needs and desires, which impel him to act mainly in his own interest. Like an iceberg whose biggest and most important part remains submerged and hidden from sight, the human being’s most essential aspect lies mysteriously veiled beneath the mists of his illusory ordinary self. And, because the desires and clamors of this perceptible little self are so noisy, he is impelled to notice only this small part of himself, totally unaware of the majesty of his Supreme Nature concealed behind all this wild uproar in him. To arrive at perceiving the huge and vital part of an iceberg covered from view, it is necessary to make the effort of plunging into the waters that surround the small exposed fragment. Enlightenment reveals how little and insignificant is the visible aspect of the human being, but attaining enlightenment is not easy. Not only does it demand much patient struggle from the seeker but also, and above all, a profound and sustained sincerity. This spiritual struggle equally signifies the start of true sincerity in the aspirant’s relationship with the outside world. For, although he may not be especially aware of it at the time, the very desire to be sincere inevitably entails a very special and subtle effort for its fulfillment, which— at the instant when he is being sincere— automatically brings with it an inward movement, or rather, a particular descent into himself that the seeker normally does not perceive. This descent into himself is the start of and key to self- recollectedness— even though, in the beginning, he may not necessarily recognize or sufficiently understand it. Furthermore, he may also not fully comprehend nor appreciate the secret action and effect this mysterious descent into himself has, both on his feelings and on his mind. Thus, he might perhaps let slip a precious opportunity and means for opening the door that can eventually lead to the realization of his True Nature. All strivings to be sincere call for an act of inner presence, which is the start of inner awakening and the “pushing out of the way” of the seeker’s ordinary self to be replaced by something more worthy. Sincerity, to both himself and others, is the beginning and the end of all things. It is, in any case, unquestionably the basis of all spiritual search. Without it, enlightenment is absolutely impossible. Sincerity is also the very life and force of all great artistic creations. The exalted feelings that a sublime musical work inspires in its listeners are nothing less than the expression of the same lofty sentiments and profound sincerity its creator, the composer, had in him at the time of its creation. For it is solely in the degree to which a composer is himself stirred and elevated when working that he will stir and elevate his audience (if they are receptive enough), and the depth of his sincerity cannot fail but evoke its equivalent in them. The mysterious effect that music can have on the feelings and thoughts of those who listen to it is often colossal. It can even be strangely disquieting at times, showing the terrible responsibility a composer has to all who come under the influence of his music and receive in their being the subtle suggestions his work secretly imparts to them. Ordinarily, there is no way of explaining life and death. To understand life and its meaning, it is necessary to understand death a little; and to understand death a little, it is equally necessary to understand life better— and above all, “That” which is behind it, animating it and sustaining the whole Universe. It would seem there is no possibility of finding the answer to this enigma if it were not that, during particularly profound mystical states in meditation, one can have some foretaste and subtle knowledge of the after- death state— that is to say, into what one will be reabsorbed on leaving this form of existence. Understanding death a little better helps one understand life a little better too, and understanding life a little better helps one understand death also a little better, until one finally arrives at discovering that these two conditions mysteriously merge into one another, revealing a state of nondifferentiation between them— just as there is only one atmosphere surrounding the globe, unchanging in its essence, whether it is day or whether it is night. But these are understandings that can never be clearly and correctly expressed in words. One cannot explain such things beyond a certain limit: firstly, because it would not be possible to avoid distorting them to some degree; and secondly, to prevent their being misunderstood and misrepresented later by others. In addition to the above reasons, the author, having received no education, is extremely mistrustful of himself, considering himself far from qualified to put into words, beyond a certain point, revelations of such importance. Ultimately, each person must seek out and live these extraordinary experiences and truths for himself to be able to understand them. They cannot be understood with the mind, nor transmitted intellectually. In fact, the mind is a veritable handicap in this area. The subtle language of great symphonic music can sometimes explain life and its meaning in a manner that can never be done intellectually nor understood with the rational mind, even though it should not be forgotten that, no matter how great a work of art may be, it is still mixed up to some degree, be it ever so slight, with the artist’s habitual state of being. However, this does not exclude the fact that very elevated feelings and subtle understandings reaching him from higher invisible spheres can, to some extent, mysteriously be translated into music. Its wordless speech, made up of exalted sentiments and silent suggestions, immediately touch the listener’s very being and is secretly understood by him through direct intuition. Although great beauty and spiritual truths can be transmitted through the medium of literature and speech, nevertheless, there is always a considerable danger of their being misinterpreted, each person understanding them in his own way according to his education and conditioning, which, in turn, leads to his deforming them, often resulting in fierce dissension and violence between people. But there is a superior kind of art, or medium of transmission, where the intellect and mouth are silenced. In this form of art, the beauty and spiritual truths imparted are received directly by the eye through sacred paintings, religious sculptures, certain forms of dancing (in particular Indian dancing), and special architectural masterpieces (such as temples, shrines, mosques, and so forth), with a lesser possibility existing of deforming these truths. However, an even higher form of art exists in which the intellect, the mouth, and the eyes are completely passive. The spiritual truths, beauty, and love communicated are received directly through the feelings by the subtle language of music that vibrates deep inside the listener’s heart. Here, the chances of misrepresenting these truths are greatly reduced. For, whatever their creed or race, and no matter where they happen to be, when a group of people are assembled together, listening to the sublime harmonies and wonderful orchestral “colors” of a great symphonic work secretly imparting to them an ineffable truth through expressions of elevated sentiments, the minds, thoughts, and feelings of all are then united in one silent communion. At that exalted hour, words have lost all their meaning. If the aspirant is receptive enough, he will discover that listening to certain music can mysteriously help bring about this important descent into himself spoken of earlier. Some rare beings gifted with very unusual sincerity, capacity of concentration, and great sensitivity, rendering them capable of capturing these invisible influences coming from “the spheres of the gods,” are chosen by higher forces— and are, in an ordinarily incomprehensible way, sacrificed— to transmit to the world through music a ray of light and the enigmatic message of this inward descent into oneself. The force born of the unusual sincerity that some rare composers have in them during their creative moments is something that only someone who has experienced it himself in some form or another can understand, appreciate, and speak of. The inspiration and aesthetic sentiments that move a genius in his periods of creativity can arise in him only in a state of extreme inner stillness, receptivity, and exceptional sincerity, rendering every note he writes inevitable. That is to say, each note of the theme and harmony of his music go where they ought to go and could not possibly have gone anywhere else, evoking in the listener the strange feeling of rediscovering an evident truth that he seems to know already from some enigmatic source— even though he is, in fact, listening to this music for the first time in his life. Apart from the profound sentiments and lofty intimations that some musical masterpieces convey (like a mysterious wind blowing from an invisible and strange land, whispering softly inside the ear of humanity an ever- so- subtle message), the particular sort of tenderness and unusual love that music (especially Indian music) sometimes communicates to the human soul are perhaps its most important contribution to the field of art. This kind of love does not in any way resemble the ordinary love one is familiar with in life, which is always directed outwardly to something or somebody, and mainly aroused through desire. Such love is unstable and unpredictable, influenced by outer circumstances and the need of the moment. It changes like the wind, and is even often transformed into its contrary. The unusually tender love that one encounters in music, speaking subtly to the heart of the human being in the sublime language of the gods, sometimes moving him to tears without any apparent reason for it, comes down to him as an indication pointing the way inward, secretly influencing his feelings and opening his mind to something higher that he otherwise could not experience nor know of in his customary state of being. More so even than in art, sincerity in meditation and sadhana is absolutely vital. It is the essential pillar upon which all spiritual efforts must rest and is unquestionably the seeker’s strongest arm and protection in his difficult quest. Without genuine and profound sincerity, he will merely dream that he is meditating or practicing a sadhana. Each time the aspirant sits and meditates, he has to do it with all his being, with ever renewed sincerity, always meditating as if for the first time, no matter what exalted spiritual experiences he may have been privileged with before. To help an aspirant who— depending on his type and temperament— may pass through similar experiences as those of the author (who was atrociously alone at that time, with no one around him capable of sufficiently understanding his problems, needs, and sufferings to guide him), the following painful trials he underwent will be indirectly recounted, together with some important advice for the seeker. As the aspirant quietly descends into himself during his meditation, remaining inwardly ever so still and silent in a state of continual self- abandonment, a moment may come when, through Divine Grace, he will be stirred by a most unusual feeling of love, filling him with a sublime and tender melting sensation spreading all around from his solar plexus, a sensation so unusual and strong that he may afterward find himself weeping violently without fully understanding why. This out- of- the- ordinary sentiment may, in a very inadequate way, be compared to the strange sensation of experiencing extreme sadness and happiness simultaneously, such as the intense emotions of a bereaved woman who, having lost her beloved under tragic circumstances, suddenly dreams of him in her sleep and is so overcome with joy and affection at seeing him whom she believed dead that her heart is gripped with the most singular feeling of profound pain and felicity as she ever- so- fondly tries to smile at him while shedding endless tears of bliss in her dream. The experience of this uncommon love will deeply affect and mark the seeker. He will unmistakably recognize that what has taken place in him is an out- of- the- ordinary sentiment of mystical love, a most tender and strange love that cannot be compared to anything one normally knows in life. For in this case, this particular love is not stimulated by nor directed to anyone or anything external. There is simply an inexplicable state of love, a most unusual melting sentiment of profound mystical love that one has become immersed in and one with. When the seeker first goes through this unusual experience, he may be so deeply moved that he will afterward find his whole body shaking with the weeping that this strange and ecstatic love will have provoked in him. This intense weeping with which he is so suddenly seized is mainly due to an aspect of his being that is not ready to support such an uncommon and powerful experience, and he has to be extremely careful afterward, since there is the risk in such cases of a destructive emotional state settling in without perhaps his being aware of it. If allowed to remain, it will be very difficult to dislodge, for, strangely enough, one can become attached to this emotional state, which will then devour the person in whom it has installed itself, rendering him tense, withdrawn, and melancholic, unable to work and only wanting to retire ever further into himself and brood on this experience. The danger is even greater when it is accompanied with the avid desire to relive these intense moments. If the seeker gives in to this craving, it will seriously perturb all his future meditations. It will become an obsession, constantly gnawing at him, and drawing him away from what his true aim should be. He will then go through much torment and suffering before he realizes his mistake. This warning applies equally to all other powerful mystical phenomena or states that the seeker may go through. He should never at any time, either consciously or unconsciously, seek to recreate such moments, no matter how fascinating and wonderful they may have been. It is important in any case to understand that experiences of such an extraordinary nature cannot come again at one’s command, in exactly the same manner, bringing with them exactly the same states that one has had before. The aspirant will have to realize that both he and the conditions that helped bring on these states have changed. As already repeatedly stressed, he must learn to cultivate in himself the attitude and subtle art of always starting his meditation with the utmost sincerity and inner stillness as if it were for the first time, forgetting all that took place on previous occasions. Although during one’s meditation one sometimes experiences very strange mystical phenomena and is given foretastes of transcendent emotional states, it should be understood that this does not necessarily mean that one has fully earned or deserved them. They may come as an encouragement and subtle indication only, silently showing the way, according to the particular need of the moment, before being partially withdrawn from the seeker for a certain time. He may afterward have to pass again through terrible moments of uncertainty and despair until he succeeds in making the right efforts to rise to yet greater heights in himself. At that time, other experiences will unexpectedly come to help him advance still further in his spiritual journey. As a result of all his previous inner work he may, at certain privileged moments, suddenly touch a higher dimension and mysteriously see what will seem to him to be all the different aspects and different possibilities of a thing or a situation simultaneously. But the aspirant has to be extremely circumspect afterward, and watch that these exalted states and out- of- the- ordinary experiences that he is sometimes permitted to have are not immediately taken by his lower self and used for itself. There is a lot of stupidity, foolish ideas, and egotism in every man and woman that have to be “knocked out” of them, and this “cleaning up” of oneself is not achieved without much struggle, pain, and suffering. As the seeker becomes more practiced and mature, his lower nature will also have undergone much transformation through all these lofty spiritual experiences and the higher understanding they have brought him. Then a profound cosmic stillness will descend upon him when meditating, and this ineffable state of ecstatic love will also have a different effect on him; he will feel a very tranquil but sublime tenderness into which he will quietly merge; and, as always during such out- of- the- ordinary moments, this enigmatic Nada will more than ever make its presence felt and, with its eternal jewel- like glitter, sing in his ears its supernal song at the same time as it helps him increase his inner absorption. This, as it deepens, will always bring him the strange yet curiously familiar sensation of having returned to the mysterious Source whence he originated, and to which he belongs. The way this divine flame may affect an aspirant the first time it illuminates his being with its ineffable love can be compared to that of a fierce fire consuming a log of wood, its flames leaping about wildly in all directions in the wind. And the way it will affect him later, when he will have acquired deeper spiritual comprehension, more control over his thoughts, and greater inner calm, can be compared to the immobile, soft, and beautiful flame of a candle on a perfectly windless evening. Something of this beatific state will— apart from the moments when he sits alone and meditates— afterward extend itself of its own accord into the seeker’s active life, silently stirring him with a melting feeling of quiescent and compassionate love.
  43. 3 points
    No. There are differences to the style of writing as well. One is a translation based on the Devi wars from Markendey Puran. The other is in Guru Sahibs own words.
  44. 3 points
  45. 3 points
  46. 3 points
    Lucky

    Sleep during meditation

    @moorakh, I totally second what Sat1176 has explained above. Whether you should think of sleep as a hindrance or not, is difficult to justify. According to my own experience, I reckon that some of us may assume we are falling asleep, but in fact, we are rising into deeper states. I'm no expert on sleep, but i can give a few pointers for you to look into.... - If you drift off into dream state, then this is mostly Maya. I'm referring to doing simran whilst sat up with back straight. Doing simran whilst lying down is something I could discuss in the future. For yourself, at this stage, i would pay attention to what happens exactly when you think you're falling asleep? 1) You're head may droop forward, but if you're back and posture is giving way, then a) you are probably going into dream state-maya or b) you're prana flow isn't strong enough. OR 2) if you are drifting and can maybe hear things in background, and not losing your asan, AND gurmantar is still going, ..then you are most likely going towards the dreamless void(eventually). From what I remember, this stage was rather confusing because i was never sure if i were asleep or in deeper consciousness. IMO, i'd say to continue going deeper into your simran if you are encountering this. Just keep checking that your gurmantar was still going. The tricky part is that you'll only be able to confirm this once you are back and fully awake (disassociated). This was the approach that i was using at the time, even though I wasn't sure, but It helped in progressing further. I hope that gives you better understanding. Really, you don't wanna overthink it too much either but just keep focus on gurmantar. If sleep comes, and you really feel inclined to get under the duvet, then do so. Otherwise, just continue and assess after the session. Before hearing naam, you're mind will go through a number of intermediary stages. It's all about 'cleansing' the mann. In time, you will learn that there is much more to sleep and how a gurmukh remains jagath 'an-din' (day-night). I'm not going to say too much on those topics or how it's possible, because it will probably be confusing.
  47. 3 points
    Sat1176

    Sleep during meditation

    @Mooorakh Listen from 12 minutes to what your experiencing.
  48. 3 points
    Brilliant khant simran explanation and walkthrough from time index 26 mins. Also how to take simran down to nabhi plus obtaining Amrit from gurmantar.
  49. 3 points
    No problem .. My advice is that you try not look at them or ay attention. I know that sounds difficult, because they grab your attention too easily and divert you from jaap. All I can suggest is to try and focus on the dhun... If it's any consolation, I did go thru a little phase of what you describe. I recall the single like eye of horus. It got me curious and wanting to find out more as well. I know there is some relationship with eye of horus and pineal gland. The pineal gland is where the holy nectar of God's comes from, the amrit rus, ambrosia or the soma.. Maybe you are tasting amrit rus or will start tasting it soon?........I honestly cant recall if there was any relationship between seeing the eye and getting sweet taste. It's supposed to be the all seeing eye, so just let it do it's business and you carry on with the dhun. That what I remember thinking to myself. Also, try not to think about it too much and that's what I've always done if I felt some curiosity slowing me down or becoming a hindrance. When I say "don't think about it" ,,. I mean don't let the thought of something affect your emotions. Don't get scared or feel fear, and don't get excited either....Just kind of shrug your shoulders, do ardas to waheguru to help keep your pace going....... and try and do just that.....keep going.
  50. 3 points
    it's all good I reckon. I assume that when you say 3/4 of way up you would have felt tingling/vibration between throat and heart area? ..It was probably localised in core- middle of the body between cross-section of spinal-back and front of neck area?.. Then, in some people it can either go straight upwards towards upper head, or sometimes upwards and towards center of brows. Seems like the route of sukhmana/central channel from what I gather and is probably part of the activation stages. You are right that it won't be kundalini, because that is a lengthy process than most of us understand. Firstly the channels or gateways begin to open whilst kundalini starts it's awakening...and then after enough awakening/activation, and when there is a pathway open enough for it to travel through, will it begin to rise. Don't worry about 3rd eye opening and all that, because that is another thing that is too often misunderstood and explained. It is no pre-requisite, and it actually occurs in many stages which are mostly different and variable for all of us .... My advice is to stick to "listening" and not visuals. What you are meant to see or be shown, will automatically occur with kirpa whilst your dhyian is on the DHUN of gurmantar. Therefore focus on the DHUN, Gurbani says ਧੁਨਿ ਮਹਿ ਧਿਆਨੁ ਧਿਆਨ ਮਹਿ ਜਾਨਿਆ ਗੁਰਮੁਖਿ ਅਕਥ ਕਹਾਨੀ ॥੩॥ Ḏẖun mėh ḏẖi▫ān ḏẖi▫ān mėh jāni▫ā gurmukẖ akath kahānī. keep focus on dhun and be absorbed in it, then you shall receive the knowledge from this very dhyian on the dhun itself ..thus, the gurmukh speaks and learns the Unspoken speech. (meaning the gyan will come without any words that are ever heard or spoken) Keep going and don't ever let oncoming encounters distract you. Experience them, acknowledge ..and then move on...
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