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  1. XPOSITION OF PRINCIPAL GURMAT DEVICE (JUGTI) OF LISTENING AND FUSION OF CONSCIOUSNESS WITH SOUND AND IMAGE OF GURMANTER (UNION OF SURAT WITH DHUN AND GURMANTER) Definition of listening Through the grace of Sri Guru Nanak Devji, astonishing benefits of word listening are available in Japji Sahib, for the salvation of the people of the entire world. Listening (Suniye) does not constitute ordinary hearing. What exactly is complete or real listening? The meaning of complete listening is achieving a state of absolute union of consciousness and sound, and maintaining this union as if both the entities have been sewn together. If this state of complete union persists with each breath and at all times, then it is a state of complete peace and a sign of being a perfect human being or a saint (Gurmukh avastha). This state can be achieved with the Guru’s grace by understanding and following the correct technique with intense meditation, concentration and self-discipline. General guidelines for the Art of Speaking andTechnique of Listening: (a) Gurmanter (Waheguru) should be spoken very softly and slowly so as to feel the airtype sound vibrations in the throat going upwards towards and in the head while focusing on both ears with full attention of mind as well as body. Stay relaxed and focused on sound vibrations while repeating the Gurmanter. Gurmanter can be repeated as one word but focus should be fully on sound vibrations and not on breath. Initially, one should repeat recitation of Gurmanter as many times as can be done conveniently in one breath because it would help in keeping the focus on sound vibrations. (b) When one starts feeling sound vibrations in the head, focus should be shifted to the highest point or spot in the head where such vibrations are being felt. Stay focused at the point while repeating the Gurmanter. (c) The point/spot in the head with Name-practice will move upwards and deeper in the head. With further practice, point/spot of sound vibrations will become thinner and thinner and more pointed. Focus should continue to be shifted to the point/spot where sound vibrations are being felt. (d) While doing Name-practice, efforts be made to bring and keep consciousness as close to sound vibrations as possible in a relaxed manner keeping in view the fact that in perfect listening, fusion of consciousness and sound should take place. (e) If one can focus on the highest and the deepest point/spot in the head without uttering Gurmanter, one should stay focused thereon as long as possible. (f) With marked improvement in the art of speaking and technique of listening, musical sounds called ‘Naads’ will be heard. One can stay focused on the deepest sound to improve and keep the focus on inward listening. (g) Maximum time be spent on Name-practice as per convenience. Best time for Name-practice are the ambrosial hours in a noise-free and clean environment Standards for measuring progress: The progress on the path of true listening can be judged by comparing with the following standards:- (A) With the union of consciousness and sound, has the mind achieved a state of persistent calm and stillness? Is the mind relaxed and at peace? (B) Do the consciousness and sound unite inside the head or at the top of the head during Name recitation? Is this union attained or not; and if so, for how long does it persist in a relaxed, natural and easy manner? (C) The following are the signs of union of consciousness with sound:- (1) Body and mind are awash in peace and bliss. (2) Improvement in condition of the body as a whole. (3) Spiritual intoxication. (4) Hearing of Naad (Divine or celestial sounds and music). Divine sounds are calming and pure, spiritually intoxicating and provide amazing joy. (D) Do the consciousness and sound unite without actually speaking the Name? If so how long does this union persist easily and effortlessly? (E) Effortless union of consciousness and sound is the state of absolute blissful meditation. GOAL: CONTINUOUS AND UNINTERRUPTED RESIDENCE OF NAAM IN MIND AND BODY A) The goal can be achieved if the Naam is made to stay in the consciousness, tongue, eyes, throat and abdomen simultaneously with ease and effortlessly. Sustained effort is to be made to achieve this goal. B) Naam has to be practiced by chanting, reciting, hearing and by writing and rewriting the Divine Name. Sustained practice will ensure success. Hurried and forced practice is prohibited and is to be avoided. The path of Divine Name recitation requires that it be practiced in a natural, easy and relaxed manner. C) It is imperative that the correct method of Naam practice is properly understood, followed and practiced. STEPS FOR NAAM PRACTICE FIRST STAGE: DISCOVERING the mind and reciting with mind Step 1: With closed eyes looking at the lips, recite the Divine Name with the tongue in a relaxed and easy manner while listening to its sound with the consciousness staying focused on the sound. Step 2: Keeping attention on the lips and both ears , focus on listening to the sound of the Divine Name as it is recited with the tongue. Step 3: Maintaining attention on the throat and both ears, focus on listening to the sound of the Divine Name while feeling the sound vibrations in the head. Step 4: Maintain attention on the head, recite the Divine Name and feel its sound as it vibrates just below the top of the head (taalu in Punjabi). Full focus should be centered on hearing. True benefit of reciting and listening to the Divine Name will begin to be accrued when it is done through the mind/consciousness/(Surat in Punjabi). The goal is to achieve this aforementioned state and continue the Naam practice with the mind. SECOND STAGE: Naam practice with the mind and body Step 5: Reciting Naam with tongue, attempt to maintain focus on the sound originating in the bottom of the throat. One Divine House (Ghar) is located in the throat. Effort should be made to unite consciousness with the sound and Gurmanter in the throat as in the Throat House, one may experience effulgence of Divine light there. Further, Naam is to descend to Hirdey through throat. For this reason, practice of Naam at the throat will be beneficial. Step 6: ‘Hirdey’ is located in the abdomen below the navel. While reciting Naam with tongue, focus attention on the sound as it resonates through the windpipe and travels to the ‘Hirdey’. Recitation of Name with tongue should be accompanied by movement of the abdomen. Step 7: Maintaining attention from throat through windpipe in the abdomen, continue to recite Name as it is accompanied by movement of the abdomen and focus on listening to the sound as it vibrates in the windpipe, throat and head while keeping attention in the Hirdey as well. Step 8: Naam Amrit can be accessed by listening through Hirdey. For achieving this state, focus on the sides of the abdomen as Hirdey is located below the navel, recite Gurmanter with tongue synchronizing with the movement of the abdomen maintaining primary attention at the sides of the abdomen for listening through the windpipe by Hirdey with secondary focus on listening through ears in the head as well as mind. Alternatively, focus primarily at the mind on top of the head with secondary focus on the ears, throat, windpipe and abdomen –all that simultaneously before uttering Gurmanter, then utter Gurmanter with full focus on listening the sound vibrations at the above-mentioned spots. Step 9: After long and sustained practice, with the imprint of the Gurmanter in the mind, on the tongue, in the throat, windpipe and Hirdey, Naam practice is done without uttering Gurmanter effortlessly, naturally and with ease. At this stage, mind and body will be Naam-dyed with the mind being steady and motionless. THIRD STAGE: I. II. To obtain benefit of the practice of Naam recitation, every effort should be made to recite and listen to the Divine Name with love and reverence, while following the contents of the above mentioned 9 steps. Without verbalizing the Name, attempt should be made to have the Divine Name reside in the mind at all times while standing, sitting, walking and lying down. FOURTH STAGE: As per the priceless words of Bhai Gurdasji, with the union of word, sound and consciousness, it is possible to reach the otherwise unapproachable God. Therefore in the fourth stage attempt is to be made to be achieve union of sound, word (image of word Waheguru) and consciousness in the mind and body. This union requires persistent practice that is to be performed in a natural, easy and relaxed manner. To obtain benefit of Naam meditation, union of these 3 entities is to be kept in mind while following the contents of the above mentioned 9 steps. For union of word and consciousness some special steps are to be followed. The word will enter and come to reside in the consciousness through the eyes. SPECIAL STEPS: Step 1: To write the word Waheguru lovingly 15- 20 times maintaining adequate spacing between each written word. Step 2: To read and recite the written words with reverence and love. Step 3: With eyes closed, practice creating image of the word Waheguru in the eyes. Step 4: To lovingly write, read and thereafter create image of the word Waheguru in the eyes. Step 5: Practice creating image of the word Waheguru in the eyes accompanied by its recitation. Step 6: Creating image of the word Waheguru in the consciousness and practice its recitation. Step 7: It is advisable to place stickers of the word Waheguru in the bedroom, kitchen, office and rear seat of the car, as per convenience. The image of the word Waheguru on the stickers is to be looked at lovingly and attempt is to be made to have the image reside in the eyes and mind. Step 8: Maintaining attention on the lips attempt to create the image of the word in the mouth or on the tongue accomapnied by its recitation with focus on listening to its sound. Step 9: Attention is to be maintained on the lips and both ears while creating the image of the word in the mouth or on the tongue, accompanied by its recitation with focus on listening to its sound. Step 10: Maintain attention on the throat and both ears, create image of the word in the throat accompanied by its recitation with tongue while listening to the sound and its vibrations in the head. Step 11: Maintain attention on the head, focus on the image of the word accompanied by its recitation with the tongue. Listen to the sound and its vibrations just below the top of the head (taalu in Punjabi) while attempting union of the word with its sound. Attempt should be made to maintain union of the image and sound of the word inside the head. Step 12: Maintaining attention on the image of the word in the throat, while reciting word with tongue concentrate on listening to the sound and attempting to keep focus at the bottom of the throat. Time devoted to this activity is based on availability and convenience. Step 13: ‘Hirdey’ is located in the abdomen below the navel. Keeping focus downwards on the abdomen or on the image of the word in the abdomen, recite Name with tongue while feeling the sound in the air passages of the lungs or lower down in the abdomen. Maintain fusion of concentration and sound and make the ‘Hirdey’ listen to it. Recitation with tongue should be accompanied by movement of the abdomen. Time devoted to this activity is based on availability and convenience. Step 14: While keeping focus downwards on the abdomen or on the image of the word in the abdomen recite Name with tongue accompanied by movements of the abdomen. Feeling the sound in the throat and head attention is to be focused on the sound of the word and fusion of word with its image. Time devoted to this activity is based on availability and convenience. Step 15: While keeping focus downwards on the abdomen or on the image of the word in the abdomen recite Name with tongue accompanied by movements of the abdomen. Feeling the sound just below the top of the head (taalu in Punjabi) attention is to be focused on the sound of the word and fusion of word with its image. Time devoted to this activity is based on availability and convenience. Step 16: To keep sitting in meditation quietly while feeling the Name and its fusion with its rhythm in the mind, eyes, mouth, throat and abdomen. Attention should be continuous and undisturbed. This is the state of complete peace and union of mind with the Divine Name. One should try to maintain this state of mind in a relaxed, natural and easy manner (effort should not be forced or done out of compulsion). NOTE: (i) In the fourth stage, focus should be on the image of the word and its sound. One has to keep trying to keep focus on these two entities while attempting to maintain their union. (ii) With the head bowed down, without speaking, looking at the abdomen, the image of the word has to be kept in the mind and inside the abdomen or above it. (iii) (iv) (v) By first practicing the above mentioned points through repeated recitation (speaking), one can make the Name reside in the mind. Following this, while maintaining union of the word and its image, recitation must now be continued in a natural and relaxed manner without actually speaking. The amount of time devoted to each point can be adjusted depending on convenience and availability. It is possible to have darshan of the otherwise unseen and unapproachable Wahegurujee whose grace alone can provide union of consciousness, Name and sound. The complete union of these three entities is possible only with the Guru’s grace. For this union to occur, one must keep saying ardaas at the feet of Satgurujee.
  2. Version 1.0.0

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    Deep spiritual book on Naam Simran and how to meet God by Bhai Sewa Singh Ji Tarmala
  3. Waheguru It looks like they even took down all the videos on vimeo, did anyone download any of the videos. If you did please upload them for the Sangat. Can't see any of the videos https://vimeo.com/user10008952
  4. Waheguru Ji sorry here is the PDF http://www.gurunanakhealing.com/static/Naam-Di-Vidhi.pdf
  5. nwm AiBAws kmweI dw tIcw tIcw: nwm nUM mn Aqy qn iv`c vswauxw a) suriq, jIB, A`KW, gly qy pyt iv`c vswieAw jw skdw hY[ iehnW QwvW qy nwm nUM vswaux dw Xqn krnw hY qy krdy rihxw hY[ A) nwm gw ky, bol bol ky, sux sux ky qy ilK ilK ky vswauxw hY[ lMby AiBAws nwl kwmXwbI imldI hY[ kwhlwpx qy hT TIk nhI hY[ ieh sihj dw mwrg hY[ e) nwm AiBAws kmweI dI jugqI smJx dI loV hY[ suxn dI jugqI pihlw pVHwA: mn q`k phuMc ky nwm mn iv`c vswauxw kdm-1 : bulW v`l iDAwn r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw qy Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy suxnw[ kdm-2 : iDAwn bulW qy dovyN kMnW qy r`KidAW hoieAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy suxnw[ kdm-3 : iDAwn gly qy kMnW qy r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr iv`c mihsUs krky, Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`K ky suxnw[ kdm-4 : iDAwn isr au`pr r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy auprly ih`sy iv`c qwlU dy Q`ly mihsUs krnw, iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy mn rwhIN suxnw[AslI nwm AiBAws kmweI, mn jW suriq rwhIN bolx qy suriq rwhIN suxn dI AvsQw qoN AwrMB huMdI hY[ies styj qy hr roj phuMc ky AiBAws kmweI krI jwxI hY[ dUjw pVHwA: mn qy qn iv`c nwm vswauxw kdm-5 : rsnw nwl bolidAW hoieAW, iDAwn gly iv`c r`K ky Avwj iv`c joV ky gly dy AMdr Q`ly nUM r`Kx dw Xqn krnw hY[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-6 : ihrdw nwBI dy Q`ly pyt iv`c hY[ iDAwn Q`ly nUM pyt qy r`K ky rsnw rwhIN bolxw, Avwj nUM PyPiVAW dI nwlI iv`c jW Q`ly mihsUs krky iDAwn Avwj iv`c joVidAW hoieAW ihrdy nUM suxwauxw[rsnw nwl boldy smyN pyt dI hrkq hoxI cwhIdI hY[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-7 : iDAwn pyt qy jW pyt v`l r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj gly qy isr iv``c mihsUs kridAW iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy suxnw[smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs kdm-8 : iDAwn pyt qy r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy au`pr (qwlU dy Q`ly) mihsUs kridAW, iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy suxnw[smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-9 : ibnW bolx qoN Dun nUM mn iv`c mihsUs kridAW Dun c iDAwn r`K ky bYTy rihxw[ ipAwr nwl suxn dI jugqI qIjw pVHwA: auprokq nOvyN kdmW iv`c ipAwr nwl bolx qy suxn dw Xqn kridAW AiBAws kmweI krnI hY[ kdm-10 : bulW v`l iDAwn r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw qy Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy ipAwr nwl suxnw[ kdm-11 : iDAwn bulW qy dovyN kMnW qy r`KidAW hoieAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy ipAwr nwl suxnw[ kdm-12 : iDAwn gly qy kMnW qy r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr iv`c mihsUs krky, Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`K ky ipAwr nwl suxnw[ kdm-13 : iDAwn isr au`pr r`K ky rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy auprly ih`sy iv`c qwlU dy Q`ly mihsUs krnw, iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy mn rwhIN ipAwr nwl suxnw[AslI nwm AiBAws kmweI, mn jW suriq rwhIN bolx qy suriq rwhIN suxn dI AvsQw qoN AwrMB huMdI hY[ies styj qy hr roj phuMc ky AiBAws kmweI krI jwxI hY[ kdm-14 : rsnw nwl ipAwr nwl bolidAW hoieAW, iDAwn gly iv`c r`K ky Avwj iv`c joV ky gly dy AMdr Q`ly nUM r`Kx dw Xqn krnw hY[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-15 : ihrdw nwBI dy Q`ly pyt iv`c hY[ iDAwn Q`ly nUM pyt qy r`K ky rsnw rwhIN bolxw, Avwj nUM PyPiVAW dI nwlI iv`c jW Q`ly mihsUs krky iDAwn Avwj iv`c joVidAW hoieAW ihrdy nUM suxwauxw[rsnw nwl boldy smyN pyt dI hrkq hoxI cwhIdI hY[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-16 : iDAwn pyt qy jW pyt v`l r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj gly qy isr iv``c mihsUs kridAW iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy ipAwr nwl suxnw[smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-17 : iDAwn pyt qy r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy au`pr (qwlU dy Q`ly) mihsUs kridAW, iDAwn Avwj iv`c itkwauxw qy ipAwr nwl suxnw[smW AwpxI kdm-18 : ibnW bolx qoN Dun nUM mn iv`c mihsUs kridAW Dun c ipAwr nwl iDAwn r`K ky bYTy rihxw[ cOQw pVHwA: BweI gurdws jI dy Amolk kQn Anuswr surq, Avwj qy Sbd (mUrq) dy sumyl nwl Agm pRmysr q`k phuMc ho skdI hY[ ies vwsqy, cOQy pVHwA iv`c Dun (Avwj), Sbd (vwihgurU Sbd dI mUrq) qy surq dw mn qy qn iv`c sumyl krn dw Xqn krnw hY[ iqMnW dw sumyl bhuq hI sihj nwl hoxw hY[ auprokq id`qy nOvyN kdmW iv`c iqMnW dw sumyl kridAW nwm AiBAws kmweI krnI hY[ Sbd surq dy sumyl vwsqy kuJ ivSyS Xqn krny hn[ Sbd ny A`KW rwhIN surq iv`c jwxw Aqy vsxw hY[ ivSyS Xqn: kdm-19 : vwihgurU Sbd nUM ivrlw ivrlw kr ky ipAwr nwl 15-20 vwr ilKxw[ kdm-20 : ilKy hoey SbdW nUM ipAwr nwl vyK ky ipAwr nwl bolxw[ kdm-21 : A`KW mIt ky vwihgurU Sbd dI mUrq A`KW iv`c bxwauxI Aqy ieh AiBAws krnw[ kdm-22 : iPr vwihgurU Sbd nUM ipAwr nwl ilKxw, pVHnw qy A`KW iv`c Sbd dI mUrq bxwauxI[ kdm-23 : pihlW vwihgurU Sbd dI mUrq A`KW iv`c bxwauxI Aqy iPr bolxw[ies qrHw ieh AiBAws krnw[ kdm-24 : vwihgurU Sbd dI mUrq surq iv`c bxwauxI qy bolxw Aqy ieh AiBAws krnw[ kdm-25 : vwihgurU Sbd dy sit`kr sOx vwly kmry iv`c, rsoeI, dPqr qy kwr dI ipClI sIt qy suivDw Anuswr lw lYxy cwhIdy hn[ sit`kr au`pr ilKI vwihgurU Sbd dI mUrq nUM ipAwr nwl vyKxw qy A`KW qy mn iv`c vswaux dw Xqn krnw jI[ kdm-26 : bu`lW v`l iDAwn r`K ky mUMh iv`c jW rsnw qy Sbd dI mUrq bxw ky bolxw qy Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy suxnw[ kdm-27 : iDAwn bu`lW qy dovyN kMnW qy r`KidAW hoieAw mUMh iv`c jW rsnw qy Sbd dI qsvIr bxw ky bolxw, Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`Kxw qy suxnw[ kdm-28 : iDAwn gly qy kMnW qy r`K ky gly iv`c Sbd dI mUrq bxw ky, rsnw nwl bolxw Aqy Avwj nUM isr iv`c mihsUs krky Avwj iv`c iDAwn r`K ky suxnw[ kdm-29 : iDAwn isr au`pr r`K ky Sbd dI mUrq v`l iDAwn Dr ky, rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy auprly ih`sy iv`c qwlU dy Q`ly mihsUs krnw, iDAwn Avwj qy Sbd dy sumyl iv`c itkwauxw qy mn rwhIN suxnw[koiSS kIqI jwvy ik isr iv`c Avwj qy Sbd dI qsvIr Awps iv`c imly hox[ kdm-30 : iDAwn gly iv`c Sbd dI mUrq qy r`K ky, rsnw nwl bolidAW hoieAw iDAwn Avwj iv`c joV ky gly dy AMdr Q`ly nUM r`Kx dw Xqn krnw hY[smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-31 : ihrdw nwBI dy Q`ly pyt iv`c hY[ iDAwn Q`ly nUM pyt iv`c Sbd dI mUrq qy r`K ky rsnw rwhIN bolxw, Avwj nUM PyPiVAW dI nwlI iv`c jW Q`ly mihsUs krky iDAwn Avwj iv`c joVidAW hoieAw ihrdy nUM suxwauxw[ rsnw nwl boldy smyN pyt dI hrkq hoxI cwhIdI hY[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-32 : iDAwn pyt qy jW pyt iv`c Sbd dI mUrq qy r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj gly qy isr iv`c mihsUs kridAW iDAwn Avwj qy Sbd dI mUrq dy sumyl qy itkwauxw qy suxnw[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-33 : iDAwn pyt qy jW pyt iv`c Sbd dI mUrq qy r`K ky pyt dI hrkq kridAW rsnw nwl bolxw, Avwj nUM isr dy aupr (qwlU dy Q`ly) mihsUs kridAW iDAwn Avwj qy Sbd dI mUrq dy sumyl qy itkwauxw qy suxnw[ smW AwpxI suivDw qy rs Anuswr[ kdm-34 : ibnW bolx qoN nwm qy Dun dy sumyl nUM mn iv`c, A`KW iv`c, mUMh iv`c, gly iv`c qy pyt iv`c mihsUUs kridAW hoieAW iDAwn iv`c bYTy rihxw[ iDAwn Ac`l qy inrMqr hoxw cwhIdw hY[ ieh mn dy ibSrwm jW nwm r`qy dI AvsQw hY[ ieh AvsQw sihj nwl, ibnW hT kIqy pRwpq krn qy r`Kx dw Xqn krdy rihxw cwhIdw hY[ not: (i) cOQy pVHwA iv`c iDAwn Avwj qy Sbd dI mUrq qy hoxw cwhIdw hY[ koiSS krdy rihxw hY ik Avwj qy Sbd dI mUrq iml jwx qy iDAwn iehnW dohW iv`c itk jwvy[ (ii) isr nIvW krky, ibnW bolx qoN, pyt v`l vyKidAW hoieAw, Sbd dI mUrq pyt iv`c jW pyt dy au`qy Aqy mn iv`c bxweI r`KxI[ (iii) auprokq nukiqAW iv`c id`qw hoieAw AiBAws pihlW bol bol ky krn nwl, Sbd dw itkwau mn iv`c mihsUs hox au`qy, surq Sbd dy myl nUM joVI r`Kx dI AiBAws kmweI ibnW bolx qoN, sihj nwl suivDw Anuswr krdy rihxw hY[ (iv) AwpxI suivDw qy rs dy muqwibk hr ie`k kdm qy smW lwieAw jw skdw hY[ (v) siqgurU jI dI ikRpw nwl hI surq, Sbd qy Dun dw sumyl ho ky Agm qy Agocr vwihgurU jI dy drSn hoxy hn[ iqMnW dw pUrw sumyl kyvl qy kyvl gurpRswid nwl hI hoxw hY[ (vi) ibnW bolx qoN, ipAwr jW Bwau dw Sbd au`TidAW, bYTidAW, quridAW, lytidAW mn iv`c hr smyN r`Kx dw Xqn krnw hY jI[
  6. Panj Shabad, Anhad Bani and Sehaj Dhun The terms used in the chapter include panj Shabad, anhad bani and sehaj dhun. These are in the form of music tunes. Panj shabad means the five divine sounds. They resound in the house of mind and also with Truth. The divine speech of Truth is known as Anhad Bani. It is the best of all the speeches. Truth Himself gives this speech. Sehaj dhun is the divine Word of Truth. It is the divine command for our minds and is also known as Hukam. Truth in His grace and mercy reveals His secret Shabad – the insignia of His existence- (Anhad Bani or Sehaj Dhun) to some blessed souls. The Guru gives the Gurmantra and through Gurmantra the secret Anhad Sabad (Word of Truth) is revealed to the seeker. The Sukhmana channel, located in the center of the spine travels upward making six circles (chakras). These six chakras are called khat chakras (six homes or six doors). These are the six places where the channels of Ida and Pingala meet with the Sukhmana channel. When the divine light of our soul travels through these circles, different types of sounds are produced. Gurbani says: kr kir qwl pKwvju nYnhu mwQY vjih rbwbw ] krnhu mDu bwsurI bwjY ijhvw Duin Awgwjw ] inriq kry kir mnUAw nwcY Awxy GUGr swjw ]1] rwm ko inriqkwrI ] pyKY pyKnhwru dieAwlw jyqw swju sIgwrI ] With the entry of divine light in the six chakras, the divine melody of drum beat appears and eyes act as tambourines. The sound of the guitar is heard in the forehead area. The sweet flute music resounds in the ears. The mind starts to dance is reflected by presence of sound of shaking ankle bracelets. This is the rhythmic dance of mind for the Truth. The Truth, sees all the make-up and decorations of such a mind. (SGGS 884) These sounds resemble the tones and tunes of a cricket, flute, gong, conch shell, horn, tinkling bells, trumpet, rebeck, singing cicadas in the silence of the night, and a falling bronze vessel. Other than five sounds, many more melodies manifest. On the opening of the sixth chakra, the Shabad enters the Gagan (the Tenth Sky). This continuously reverberating melody at the Tenth Sky is called Sehaj Dhun or Anhad sabad. When our mind enters the stage of UnnMunn (inward mind), all the doors open and the tunes and all the shabads start to sound. vwjy sbd Gnyry ] The divine melody of the Shabad vibrates. (SGGS 917) The combined symphony of these sounds is called Anhad Bani. When these melodies are very loud and fast they are called Taar Ghor Bajaantar (The grand orchestra of divine music). All these melodies reverberate at the Tenth Door in the Sukhmana and are called the divine music in the house of Sukhmana “Sukhman De Ghar Raag” Gr mih Gru dyKwie dyie so siqguru purKu sujwxu ] pMc sbd Duinkwr Duin qh bwjY sbdu nIswxu ] dIp loA pwqwl qh KMf mMfl hYrwnu ] qwr Gor bwijMqR qh swic qKiq sulqwnu ] suKmn kY Gir rwgu suin suMin mMfil ilv lwie ] AkQ kQw bIcwrIAY mnsw mnih smwie ] aulit kmlu AMimRiq BirAw iehu mnu kqhu n jwie ] Ajpw jwpu n vIsrY Awid jugwid smwie ] siB sKIAw pMcy imly gurmuiK inj Gir vwsu ] sbdu Koij iehu Gru lhY nwnku qw kw dwsu ] The True Guru is the All-knowing Primal Being; He shows us our true home within the home of the self. The Panch Shabad, the Five Primal Sounds, resonate and resound within; the insignia of the Shabad is revealed there, vibrating gloriously. Worlds and realms, nether regions, solar systems and galaxies are wondrously revealed. The strings and the harps vibrate and resound; the true throne of the Truth is there. Listen to the music at the Sukhman channel and concentrate in the sunn. Contemplate the Unspoken Speech, and the desires of the mind are dissolved. The heart-lotus is turned upside-down, and is filled with Ambrosial Nectar. This mind does not go out; it does not get distracted. It remembers truth without chanting and the mind is immersed in the Primal Truth of the ages. All the companions of this path are blessed with the five shabads. The Gurmukh minds dwell in their homes. Nanak is the slave of that one who seeks the Shabad and finds their home within. (SGGS 1291) From: Longing love for truth by Bhai Sewa Singh Ji Tarmala
  7. Waheguru Ji The charities name is Manukhta di sewa Sab ton waddi sewa Please see these videos, help and spread this good work
  8. SGPC has a great Puratan kirtan collection for download http://sgpc.net/puratan-kirtan/
  9. Waheguru Its good you used the proper word "Sikhi" not Sikhism which the west throws upon us. When we use our own words we build our own framework which an outsider will have to study in order to understand us. Right now were using a lot of Abrahamic terminology which distorts our Dharm. Here is one example, that will illustrate my point. When people ask are you a 'Baptized Sikh' this is foolishness on our part of not using what WE would consider a proper word for Amritdhari Sikh. Maybe a good English word might be initiationed Sikh. Like this we need to make a list of common words of our Dharm to build our own framework. Also request please listen from 10 min 32 sec of video
  10. The word “dharma” has multiple meanings depending on the context in which it is used. These include: conduct, duty, right, justice, virtue, morality, religion, religious merit, good work according to a right or rule, etc. Many others meanings have been suggested, such as law or “torah” (in the Judaic sense), “logos” (Greek), “way” (Christian) and even ‘tao” (Chinese). None of these is entirely accurate and none conveys the full force of the term in Sanskrit. Dharma has no equivalent in the Western lexicon. Dharma has the Sanskrit root dhri, which means “that which upholds” or “that without which nothing can stand” or “that which maintains the stability and harmony of the universe.” Dharma encompasses the natural, innate behavior of things, duty, law, ethics, virtue, etc. Every entity in the cosmos has its particular dharma — from the electron, which has the dharma to move in a certain manner, to the clouds, galaxies, plants, insects, and of course, man. Man’s understanding of the dharma of inanimate things is what we now call physics. British colonialists endeavored to map Indian traditions onto their ideas of religion so as to be able to comprehend and govern their subjects; yet the notion of dharma remained elusive. The common translation into religion is misleading since, to most Westerners, a genuine religion must: 1) be based on a single canon of scripture given by God in a precisely defined historical event; 2) involve worship of the divine who is distinct from ourselves and the cosmos; 3) be governed by some human authority such as the church; 4) consist of formal members; 5) be presided over by an ordained clergyman; and 6) use a standard set of rituals. But dharma is not limited to a particular creed or specific form of worship. To the Westerner, an “atheistic religion” would be a contradiction in terms, but in Buddhism, Jainism and Carvaka dharma, there is no place for God as conventionally defined. In some Hindu systems the exact status of God is debatable. Nor is there only a single standard deity, and one may worship one’s own ishta-devata, or chosen deity. Dharma provides the principles for the harmonious fulfillment of all aspects of life, namely, the acquisition of wealth and power (artha), fulfillment of desires (kama), and liberation (moksha). Religion, then, is only one subset of dharma’s scope. Religion applies only to human beings and not to the entire cosmos; there is no religion of electrons, monkeys, plants and galaxies, whereas all of them have their dharma even if they carry it out without intention. Since the essence of humanity is divinity, it is possible for them to know their dharma through direct experience without any external intervention or recourse to history. In Western religions, the central law of the world and its peoples is singular and unified, and revealed and governed from above. In dharmic traditions, the word a-dharma applies to humans who fail to perform righteously; it does not mean refusal to embrace a given set of propositions as a belief system or disobedience to a set of commandments or canons. Dharma is also often translated as “law,” but to become a law, a set of rules has to be present which must: (i) be promulgated and decreed by an authority that enjoys political sovereignty over a given territory, (ii) be obligatory, (iii) be interpreted, adjudicated and enforced by courts, and (iv) carry penalties when it is breached. No such description of dharma is found within the traditions. The Roman Emperor Constantine began the system of “canon laws,” which were determined and enforced by the Church. The ultimate source of Jewish law is the God of Israel. The Western religions agree that the laws of God must be obeyed just as if they were commandments from a sovereign. It is therefore critical that “false gods” be denounced and defeated, for they might issue illegitimate laws in order to undermine the “true laws.” If multiple deities were allowed, then there would be confusion as to which laws were true. In contrast with this, there is no record of any sovereign promulgating the various dharma-shastras (texts of dharma for society) for any specific territory at any specific time, nor any claim that God revealed such “social laws,” or that they should be enforced by a ruler. None of the compilers of the famous texts of social dharma were appointed by kings, served in law enforcement, or had any official capacity in the state machinery. They were more akin to modern academic social theorists than jurists. The famous Yajnavalkya Smriti is introduced in the remote sanctuary of an ascetic. The well-known Manusmriti begins by stating its setting as the humble abode of Manu, who answered questions posed to him in a state of samadhi (higher consciousness). Manu tells the sages that every epoch has its own distinct social and behavioral dharma. Similarly, none of the Vedas and Upanishads was sponsored by a king, court or administrator, or by an institution with the status of a church. In this respect, dharma is closer to the sense of “law” we find in the Hebrew scriptures, where torah, the Hebrew equivalent, is also given in direct spiritual experience. The difference is that Jewish torah quickly became enforced by the institutions of ancient Israel. The dharma-shastras did not create an enforced practice but recorded existing practices. Many traditional smritis (codified social dharma) were documenting prevailing localized customs of particular communities. An important principle was self-governance by a community from within. The smritis do not claim to prescribe an orthodox view from the pulpit, as it were, and it was not until the 19th century, under British colonial rule, that the smritis were turned into “law” enforced by the state. The reduction of dharma to concepts such as religion and law has harmful consequences: it places the study of dharma in Western frameworks, moving it away from the authority of its own exemplars. Moreover, it creates the false impression that dharma is similar to Christian ecclesiastical law-making and the related struggles for state power. The result of equating dharma with religion in India has been disastrous: in the name of secularism, dharma has been subjected to the same limits as Christianity in Europe. A non-religious society may still be ethical without belief in God, but an a-dharmic society loses its ethical compass and falls into corruption and decadence.
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