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Sat1176

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  1. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Ragmaala in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
    Someone seeked clarification via PM of what was said in this video. Thought I would summarise some of it here.
    1 Doing loads of waheguru simran leads to rom rom simran. This can be felt like if all your body hair or pores are standing up. For example like when your cold, nervous or even tickled.
    2 You do Waheguru gurmantar simran to bring all your thoughts to only one word/akhar "waheguru". Eventually your mind becomes still and you slowly quieten the jaap of even waheguru leaving only a silent awareness called Sunn.
    3. All that now remains is your awareness of looking at the darkness in your head but no words of thought or mental chatter remain. Just a calm presence/awareness.
    4. Then people start hearing sounds. These sounds people describe and whistling or teeeteee or peeeeee or like crikets etc. Because we are not used to listening to these types of sounds and are used to words of language we find it odd and think they are meaningless and useless sounds. We still want to use words or receive words. We are not aware that the language of the Waheguru is anhad sounds/anhad bani and not words. We have not developed practise or love/pyaar in listening to these sounds. People fob them off as teetee, peeepeee tinnitus etc. Not knowing that these sounds would lead you more closer/deeper towards Sach/Truth/Nirankar if only you listened to them.
  2. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
  3. Like
    Sat1176 reacted to Mooorakh in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
    🙏 Thank you for this one.  It is  more clear than any of the previous ones for a ' niyaana' like me.  Thanks.   now i may find my steps 👣 further. 
  4. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Mooorakh in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
  5. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Lucky in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
    Someone seeked clarification via PM of what was said in this video. Thought I would summarise some of it here.
    1 Doing loads of waheguru simran leads to rom rom simran. This can be felt like if all your body hair or pores are standing up. For example like when your cold, nervous or even tickled.
    2 You do Waheguru gurmantar simran to bring all your thoughts to only one word/akhar "waheguru". Eventually your mind becomes still and you slowly quieten the jaap of even waheguru leaving only a silent awareness called Sunn.
    3. All that now remains is your awareness of looking at the darkness in your head but no words of thought or mental chatter remain. Just a calm presence/awareness.
    4. Then people start hearing sounds. These sounds people describe and whistling or teeeteee or peeeeee or like crikets etc. Because we are not used to listening to these types of sounds and are used to words of language we find it odd and think they are meaningless and useless sounds. We still want to use words or receive words. We are not aware that the language of the Waheguru is anhad sounds/anhad bani and not words. We have not developed practise or love/pyaar in listening to these sounds. People fob them off as teetee, peeepeee tinnitus etc. Not knowing that these sounds would lead you more closer/deeper towards Sach/Truth/Nirankar if only you listened to them.
  6. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
    Someone seeked clarification via PM of what was said in this video. Thought I would summarise some of it here.
    1 Doing loads of waheguru simran leads to rom rom simran. This can be felt like if all your body hair or pores are standing up. For example like when your cold, nervous or even tickled.
    2 You do Waheguru gurmantar simran to bring all your thoughts to only one word/akhar "waheguru". Eventually your mind becomes still and you slowly quieten the jaap of even waheguru leaving only a silent awareness called Sunn.
    3. All that now remains is your awareness of looking at the darkness in your head but no words of thought or mental chatter remain. Just a calm presence/awareness.
    4. Then people start hearing sounds. These sounds people describe and whistling or teeeteee or peeeeee or like crikets etc. Because we are not used to listening to these types of sounds and are used to words of language we find it odd and think they are meaningless and useless sounds. We still want to use words or receive words. We are not aware that the language of the Waheguru is anhad sounds/anhad bani and not words. We have not developed practise or love/pyaar in listening to these sounds. People fob them off as teetee, peeepeee tinnitus etc. Not knowing that these sounds would lead you more closer/deeper towards Sach/Truth/Nirankar if only you listened to them.
  7. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from ragnarok in The Ringing Sound (Anhad Shabad; Sound Current)   
    Someone seeked clarification via PM of what was said in this video. Thought I would summarise some of it here.
    1 Doing loads of waheguru simran leads to rom rom simran. This can be felt like if all your body hair or pores are standing up. For example like when your cold, nervous or even tickled.
    2 You do Waheguru gurmantar simran to bring all your thoughts to only one word/akhar "waheguru". Eventually your mind becomes still and you slowly quieten the jaap of even waheguru leaving only a silent awareness called Sunn.
    3. All that now remains is your awareness of looking at the darkness in your head but no words of thought or mental chatter remain. Just a calm presence/awareness.
    4. Then people start hearing sounds. These sounds people describe and whistling or teeeteee or peeeeee or like crikets etc. Because we are not used to listening to these types of sounds and are used to words of language we find it odd and think they are meaningless and useless sounds. We still want to use words or receive words. We are not aware that the language of the Waheguru is anhad sounds/anhad bani and not words. We have not developed practise or love/pyaar in listening to these sounds. People fob them off as teetee, peeepeee tinnitus etc. Not knowing that these sounds would lead you more closer/deeper towards Sach/Truth/Nirankar if only you listened to them.
  8. Thanks
    Sat1176 got a reaction from tva prasad in Sleep during meditation   
    If your doing simran slowly and elongated (with slow long breathing) then sehaj avasta will naturally come as mind stills. Personally I don't think it's a bad thing. Lets say your doing you jaap during the day and you have had a good nights sleep then this is a very good stage. If your lacking sleep then it can also be a natural body response. If once in sehaj there are no dreams and thought, then that is also very good. If your falling into dreams then not so good.
    Ideally one need to start hearing anhad shabads in this sunn/sehaj state. This can take time to manifest. In one katha I heard you have to repeatedly keep pushing the mind into this state and eventually the mind begins to awaken within.
    When in the stage of no thoughts whether conscious or unconscious two jahaj's take off from that place. One is that of anhad shabad, and the second is that of falling into dreams and into thoughts and visions. You want to take the jahaj that is naam and keep surti attached to that with no thoughts.
    If you want to stay awake you will need to do jaap with determination, josh and more faster pace.
    I took these notes from Gurmat Meditation youtube channel about how to go to sleep with simran and continue bhagti throughout the night. Maybe it will offer you some guidance.
    1.Elongate waaaahe guuuuru jap and listen to dhun. This should help stop thoughts
    2.Listen to sehaj dhun if you can hear dhun and fall asleep
    3.You will enter deep sleep without dreams
    4.Then after some time you will come back for a short moment. Maybe to change sides. Don’t open eyes. Repeat gurmantar with surti or listen to anhad shabad or start gurmantar again.
    5.You will fall asleep again.
    6.Then you will awake again.
    7.Listen to anhad or simran
    8.5 shabads will start
    9.Anhad Toor (very loud) may come as combined sounds or like loud horn being blown
    10.Put dhyan (listen) on Toor if possible after which Parkash may manifest
    11.Put dhyan (look) on Parkash (Transparent glistening light - Nirankar)
     
  9. Thanks
    Sat1176 got a reaction from tva prasad in Meditation - My Experiance, Am I Allowed To Share?   
    Some people do jaap of Gurmantar to keep the mind present during a walk. Wahe left foot, Guru right foot.
     
    The Practice of Concentration While Walking Outside
     
    All men and women have in them, without knowing it, an enormous reserve of strength and energy, much of which remains unused. If these forces are not consciously channelled and constructively utilized into some form of physical, intellectual, or artistic work, then, like milk that turns sour when left standing, these forces will turn negative, or even become destructive—as can often be seen in many children and adults.
     
    For special reasons that may not be comprehensible to the ordinary person, life always procreates in an excess of abundance—but cosmic laws demand that nothing in the Universe can remain static or unused or be wasted. When unproductive, these forces will—depending on the person’s type and temperament—either go inward, acting against the person himself and eventually destroying him without his being aware of it, being used up in worries, anxieties, and restlessness, or they will flow outwardly, into sensuality, propagating tensions and strife around him—and even, on a wider scale, in engendering wars! These extra energies in the human being are destined to be utilized for his spiritual quest and struggles, as well as to adorn the world with the beauties of great artistic creations. When these higher aims are not fulfilled, then, as always, gravity will pull these forces in the only other direction they can go—downward.
     
    Most states of depression, negative emotions, and sensual desires are generally indications of unused energies. A vigilant aspirant should immediately recognize these symptoms when they arise in him and try to give his forces a positive and creative outlet before they turn rancid and seep through his being, secretly flooding it with destructive thoughts and feelings.
     
    The further one rises up a mountain, the more the atmosphere is rarefied and pure; and the nearer one approaches the peak, the more the perspective becomes vast and imposing. Similarly, there are different levels of consciousness in the Universe, from the highest to the lowest. In the higher mysterious spheres, the Devas (sublime gods) reign, reflecting their divine splendor all around in the form of spiritual light, exalted sentiments, and inspiring artistic accomplishments; while the inferior regions are inhabited by the Asuras (demonic gods), spreading dark influences everywhere. And the human being carries these two extremes hidden in him. If he does not consciously struggle to rise to the superior levels of himself, then the lower aspects of his nature will inevitably dominate and use him without his perceiving it, fruitlessly sapping his vitality.
     
    A wise and heedful aspirant will carefully watch over and protect his forces from being stealthily drawn away from him, wasted in negative emotions, futile imaginings, and unprofitable activities. He knows that he needs every drop of his energy for his spiritual struggles, and that economizing that energy is essential for him. However, if, on certain occasions, the aspirant finds himself in a disturbed, restless, or depressed mood, and for some reason or other he is unable to muster the strength to disengage himself from it, then, before this state gathers too much momentum in a downward movement and increases its hold on him, it is better that he leave his room and take up another form of spiritual practice while walking outside—a form of spiritual practice that he should, in any case, always do whenever he happens to be out of doors.
     
    Not only will this way of walking use his energies productively on days when his inner state is too difficult to control, but it will also open new avenues for him toward deeper spiritual insights and self-knowledge. The difficulties he will have to cope with in this exercise will help him see better the imperative need to remain in a state of intense self-recollectedness in action also, and not only when quietly meditating behind the walls of a monastery or in his room. Failing this, all his spiritual achievements, no matter how lofty they may be, will not have been put to the test in active life, and he cannot know how he will react or stand up to the unpredictable and fierce winds of the outside world when destiny unexpectedly flings him in their midst. For, even though he may be able to withdraw from outer life for a certain time, sooner or later he will be made to leave the protection of his seclusion and share with an agonizing humanity the fruits of his spiritual harvest—which must not, by divine law, be kept for him alone.
     
    This important new exercise mentioned above consists in concentrating all one’s attention on the soles of the feet while walking in the street. Generally, when someone is out walking, he is never present and aware of himself in the manner in which he really should be. He moves about in a state of mental absence, lost in a maze of futile imaginings. So that an aspirant might begin to understand the sense of his existence, and what is required of him by the supreme universal Mind that gave him his breath of life and intelligence, it is at first necessary for him to understand this dramatic problem of the strange state of oblivion in which he passes his life. And he needs every possible bit of help for that. He will be greatly assisted in his efforts at remaining present to himself in this exercise by feeling the soles of his feet each time they touch the ground. In this particular work, concentration on the extremities of the legs will show the aspirant the paramount need there is for him to get away from his head and his habitual thinking so as to permit a new sort of consciousness to arise in him and occupy the place of his ordinary mind. If his lower self does not remove itself—to some degree at least—to make way for something more worthy in him, then this luminous consciousness that he unknowingly carries in the depths of himself cannot come to the foreground of his being sufficiently to make its presence felt.
     
    It will be expedient for the aspirant not to venture upon such a difficult and unusual battle without some inner preparations first—otherwise he will either forget to do it most of the time, or he will not have gathered in him the necessary strength and determination to maintain such a delicate struggle. His efforts will consequently be lukewarm and not enough to bring him any positive results.
     
    Each time he is thinking of going out, he should inwardly prepare himself, even though it be for only thirty seconds. And, before starting to do this, or any other, spiritual exercise, the aspirant should always first try to feel what is at stake for him at such moments. Instead of letting his mind wander aimlessly in vain reveries, he must make it a habit always to occupy his attention in this important work with the utmost of his sincerity. He should tenaciously continue this particular exercise until he is able, at will, to remain connected inwardly to his higher Source throughout all his outer life activities, until there comes a day when this temporary support will no longer be necessary, or he may need to come back to it only in times of inner difficulty.
     
    This special work should not be given up because of the strong resistance the aspirant will encounter in himself at first. As he will notice, the slightest unexpected movement or sound can suddenly distract him from his aim: it may be a passer-by who accidentally jostles him, a fly insisting on settling on his face, or the loud bark of a dog—but, whatever it is, before he realizes what has happened, he is no longer “present”!
     
    In the beginning of his struggles to stay present, the seeker will discover that hardly has he taken a few steps than, abruptly, and in an unaccountable manner, he becomes absent and dispersed again, completely forgetting about this important spiritual work and his intention to remain concentrated. Two, or even five, minutes later or longer, he will be just as surprised when, suddenly, as in a flash, there is a strange, inexplicable and very rapid inward movement that takes place in him—the significance of which he may not appreciate nor understand at first—and he has come back to an awareness of himself again! At that very instant, he will realize that, not only had he altogether forgotten about this exercise, but that—what is even more curious—in an incomprehensible way, the knowledge and feeling of his existence had been strangely obliterated at the same time. He was mysteriously swallowed up and—so to speak—“died” in this state of self-forgetfulness!
     
    The aspirant must take particular care not to become irritated and intolerant with himself each time he loses the thread of his attention in this manner. He should patiently and persistently begin again with even greater determination, fixing his attention on, and feeling, the soles of his feet as they come down and touch the ground. Through this way of working, he will, among other things, also start to know himself as he is. He will suddenly notice all his hidden, changing, and contradictory sentiments, his unconscious inclinations to criticize, his desires, tensions, restlessness, and many other things that he otherwise could not have known.
     
    If the aspirant finds it too difficult to maintain a state of self-recollectedness during this exercise, then he should try aiming from one tree to another (without necessarily looking at them), using the distance that separates them as an additional support while keeping his attention fixed on the soles of his feet. If there are no trees about, then any other object will do. When reaching this landmark, he must immediately aim at another. But he should gradually increase the distance between them every day until he can finally drop this additional prop altogether.
     
    It is this mysterious movement toward oneself that the seeker must arrive at clearly perceiving and understanding. However, this comprehension should not come from his intellect but through his feeling and intuition. He will not fail to observe afterward—that is to say, when he recovers the awareness of himself—how, every time this state of self-oblivion descends upon and engulfs him, it is characterized by his being once more lost and identified with the ordinary aspect of his nature made up of endless fantasies, ambitions, frustrations, worries, and impracticable hopes, all of which, like a kaleidoscope, constantly change and replace one another moment by moment.
     
    In contrast, every time this sudden inward movement takes place in him, he experiences for a short instant another state of consciousness that does not last long—an unusual, uninvolved state of consciousness that he may miss, or not clearly see in the beginning. This inward movement is so narrow at first, and it happens so quickly, that he may not realize its profound meaning and importance without an enlightened teacher to point it out and expound it to him. Nevertheless, as the aspirant keeps losing and regaining this special awareness of himself, he will, little by little, come to see and understand more and better this strange phenomenon of his “disappearance and reappearance.” He will begin intuitively to perceive particularly what it was he was lost in the moment before, and to what other state of being he is recalled. He will eventually come to realize that each time this strange and inexplicable movement toward himself takes place it is like a rebirth, and whenever there is the contrary movement, going outward and “away” from himself, it is like a death.
     
    He will start to discover how he “dies” in his habitual state of oblivion at every instant of his life without seeing it.
     
    When later, after long practice, he is able to remain aware of himself for longer periods, he will then begin to live, see, and hear differently. From this impersonal higher aspect of his being, he will begin—in little flashes at first—to see things as they truly are. He will penetrate the feelings of other beings and read mysterious messages in trees, in mountains, and in all other things his eyes happen to settle upon.
     
    A human being can live more fully only insofar as he is capable of being present and connected to his Supreme Source—this mysterious, silent, uninvolved Spectator in him.
     
    Strength grows when utilized wisely and constructively. As one puts it into use, it will increase and reward its owner with yet more strength—just as when a farmer makes the initial efforts to plow his field and sow some grains of wheat, and it enigmatically brings forth a far greater harvest than was originally planted. If the aspirant can arrive at finding in himself the necessary force to start making the preliminary efforts of remaining present to himself, and begin to live through the higher levels of his consciousness, he will then muster in himself yet more energy to make further efforts and rise to still higher planes of being. In that way, he will, by his own strivings, aid his spiritual growth and transformation—for no one else can make these efforts on his behalf and work for his redemption, just as nobody can take vitality and profit from the food that is eaten and digested by another person.
     
    Strength produces more strength when put to use. By working tenaciously for his own enlightenment and salvation, the seeker will find his inner power of concentration and capacity for attention expanding. And this will develop in him intuition, insight, and intelligence of a superior order, which, when put into action, will continue mysteriously to germinate and augment and give birth to further wisdom on a still higher plane.
     
    The more one does, the more one will be capable of doing; and the less one does, the less one will be able to do. If, through his perseverance and ardent efforts, the seeker finally attains some degree of enlightenment and realizes the nature of his True Being, then, whenever moments of self-forgetfulness occur and he suddenly “comes back” to himself again (remembering, that is, to turn his look inward to the presence in him of this enigmatic, impartial, and silent “Spectator”), he will invariably find that this mysterious and luminous aspect of his consciousness is always there, ever-glowing and lighting up his being with its effulgence. In fact, it has been there unceasingly and has never at any time abandoned him. If, on certain occasions, he may have thought it was absent, it is only because he himself had turned his gaze away from it, and had forgotten it.
     
    After some time the aspirant will be surprised to find on looking back that, paradoxically, even these periods of “forgetfulness” had their place and meaning in the scheme of things to help him rise to the higher planes of his being. For he will not have failed to notice that (apart from the outer problems and pains this self-forgetfulness brings with it), each time he loses the awareness of his existence, and his attention and interest are once more drawn away from him to be wasted in fruitless reveries and activities, he suffers from a terrible emptiness and solitude in the depths of his soul. He will then begin to see clearly that the only moments he is truly conscious of existing, and has a feeling of the fullness of himself, are the moments when his look is once more turned inward toward the light of his higher nature. Afterward, he will find that, whenever he sinks again into his habitual state of oblivion, it will not be a state of such total forgetfulness as before—because, during such moments, he will experience a curious and unaccountable feeling of being ill at ease. If he is sensitive enough to recognize this condition in himself quickly, he can then turn this strange and uncomfortable feeling into yet another means or reminder to disentangle himself from whatever had so uselessly absorbed him, and to turn back forthwith to the awareness of his higher being and true life, dwelling wakefully in the peace of his celestial inner abode.
  10. Thanks
    Sat1176 reacted to Soulfinder in (Found!!) Old mysimran.info lectures taken down from YouTube.   
    Veer ji the app i use is videoder. Since i got my new phone samsung j4plus it doesn't let me download material from youtube. But on my other samsung s4 it works perfectly so i usually use the s4 for it then send it to the other phone using whatsapp or wifi direct.
     
    Here is the app homepage since this app is not published on the google play store page.
    https://www.videoder.com/
  11. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in (Found!!) Old mysimran.info lectures taken down from YouTube.   
    Which app is that?
  12. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in Samadhi   
    Concentration: The Prelude to Meditation

    The notion that a meditative mind is a blank mind is counterproductive when you’re trying to develop a fruitful meditation practice. The quickest way to achieve a blank mind is “to ask a friend to hit you over the head with a hammer.” Far from being blank, a meditative mind is concentrated; meditation is concentration sustained.

    Meditation arises when we hold an unbroken, one-pointed focus on a single object for a prolonged period. Trying to meditate without training the mind to concentrate is like trying to run before learning to stand. It can’t be done. Until the mind becomes one-pointed, it will never flow into meditation. We avoid the effort because we’re accustomed to equating concentration with exertion—like the effort required to solve a calculus problem—tension-inducing and not particularly “spiritual.” But the inward concentration that precedes meditation is neither stressful nor unpleasant. It is simply relaxed, focused awareness, a state of mind that is both calming and soothing once you get the hang of it.

    Multiplying Concentration
    The yogis define concentration as 12 seconds of unbroken attention. Sustain it for 144 seconds (12 x 12) and you have reached a state of meditation. If the mind can maintain that state for another multiple of 12 (12 x 144 seconds, or 28 minutes and 48 seconds), you have reached the first stage of samadhi (pure spiritual absorption).
  13. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in Samadhi   
  14. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in Samadhi   
  15. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Soulfinder in (Found!!) Old mysimran.info lectures taken down from YouTube.   
    Damn shame they took them all down in the first place. Can't understanding the reasoning behind it.
  16. Like
    Sat1176 reacted to Sajjan_Thug in (Found!!) Old mysimran.info lectures taken down from YouTube.   
    Waheguru 
    Came across old lectures that use to be on the mysimran.info youtube channel. They are full of knowledge on how to jap naam and deep spirituality of Gurbani.
    https://vimeo.com/user10008952
     
  17. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from tva prasad in Samadhi   
    I doubt anyone will count 12 breaths at the same time because like you say that would jeopardize the one pointedness. I think the point they are trying to convey is if one can sustain the one pointedness for roughly 12 breaths or more then you can conclude that you slowly learning to meditate even though it may be a very short duration.

    If we were to use the same argument one could say by using a mala you are also not completely one pointed because mental effort is going to be required to instruct your hand to move to the next bead which itself is a distraction.

    Its just different ways of encouragement and getting us motivated.

    Once you start enjoying the experience then all times and counts will vanish because the anand is the attraction.
  18. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Samadhi   
    Concentration: The Prelude to Meditation

    The notion that a meditative mind is a blank mind is counterproductive when you’re trying to develop a fruitful meditation practice. The quickest way to achieve a blank mind is “to ask a friend to hit you over the head with a hammer.” Far from being blank, a meditative mind is concentrated; meditation is concentration sustained.

    Meditation arises when we hold an unbroken, one-pointed focus on a single object for a prolonged period. Trying to meditate without training the mind to concentrate is like trying to run before learning to stand. It can’t be done. Until the mind becomes one-pointed, it will never flow into meditation. We avoid the effort because we’re accustomed to equating concentration with exertion—like the effort required to solve a calculus problem—tension-inducing and not particularly “spiritual.” But the inward concentration that precedes meditation is neither stressful nor unpleasant. It is simply relaxed, focused awareness, a state of mind that is both calming and soothing once you get the hang of it.

    Multiplying Concentration
    The yogis define concentration as 12 seconds of unbroken attention. Sustain it for 144 seconds (12 x 12) and you have reached a state of meditation. If the mind can maintain that state for another multiple of 12 (12 x 144 seconds, or 28 minutes and 48 seconds), you have reached the first stage of samadhi (pure spiritual absorption).
  19. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Samadhi   
    Fear of Death

    Q: My best friend was killed in a car accident recently, and her sudden death made me realize that I’m afraid of dying. Does it hurt?
    A: No, death doesn’t hurt. Death brings peace and takes away our pain. What does hurt though is fear of death. If we can overcome that, death isn’t painful. Many forces in nature are very loving, and death is one of them. It is Mother Nature’s final remedy—the most loving, kind, and generous of Her forces. Yet fear of death haunts our mind.
    As you are discovering, fear of death is quite painful. It has two ingredients: fear of loss and fear of the unknown. Fear of losing what we have and what we know ourselves to be is the main ingredient. When we die, anything we identify with is completely wiped out—our thoughts, our feelings, our learning, our attainments, our memories all vanish. From our standpoint, when we die, our children die, our spouse dies, our friends die, our possessions die, our net worth dies. All of it disappears. That’s scary and painful.

    This pain is intensified by uncertainty. We don’t know what comes after death. Will I continue to exist? If so, what will my existence be like? Most of us have no experience of the core of our being—the part of us that is utterly independent of our body, breath, mind, and senses. That is why, as we approach the moment when death separates consciousness from our familiar physical and mental selves, we panic. If I don’t have a body, if I don’t have senses, if I can’t breathe, if I don’t have a mind, then who am I? How am I going to be?

    This deep uncertainty breeds fear of death.

    Meditation destroys this fear by giving us access to the vibrant core of our being, which is completely independent of the body, breath, and mind. This direct experience engenders an unshakeable faith in a dimension of reality much deeper, more profound, and more fulfilling than anything connected with material existence. It infuses our heart and mind with confidence that we are eternal. In the light of this experience, our fear of death dissolves.
  20. Like
    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Samadhi   
    An excellent explanation worth reading. Clearly explains the goal we are trying to achieve when doing simran. The penny finally dropped for me when I read this article.

    A Seeker’s Guide to Samadhi

    Samadhi is a hot topic in yoga circles. Some practitioners believe samadhi and enlightenment are synonymous. Others think samadhi leads to enlightenment, while yet another group is convinced samadhi makes the mind go blank. Some of those seeking samadhi hope it will fall into their hands if they pray hard enough, and others believe the techniques of yoga and meditation will push them toward samadhi or pull samadhi toward them. In the 30 years of my career as a teacher, I have encountered many students and seekers from different walks of life. I have found them to be good people, very sincere. All of them have an essential qualification in common—a burning desire to have a direct experience of samadhi.

    Trying to attain samadhi without having a clear idea of what it is, without adopting a systematic approach, and without completing the preparatory steps is like trying to build a skyscraper when you have never seen one, do not have a blueprint, and do not know how to lay a foundation. You will waste your time and energy and reach nowhere. Just as mastery in any field—surgery, physics, music—requires prolonged, systematic preparation, so does attaining the highest goal of yoga. This goal is attainable only for those who follow a system.

    The Bhagavad Gita, one of the most acclaimed texts of yoga, delineates the key prerequisites. It holds that the practice of yoga is painless for those who adopt a balanced diet, balanced exercise, balanced thinking, balanced sleep, and who perform their actions with balanced understanding. These five elements are essential in laying the foundation for a meditation practice. Those who overeat or indulge in fasting suffer from various diseases. Those who exercise too much or too little suffer from exhaustion or sloth. Those who think too much or who fail to use their mind properly become the victims of anxiety or stupor. Those who sleep too much or too little suffer from inertia or hallucinations. Those who act without a balanced understanding of their actions and the consequences of their actions suffer from doubt and fear. When we design our practice against the backdrop of these five elements, our vitality, endurance, comprehension, freshness, and spontaneity expand. As these qualities expand, so does our capacity to concentrate. It is on this solid foundation that you place the formal threefold practice of yoga sadhana: dharana (concentration), dhyana (meditation), and samadhi (spiritual absorption).

    These three are like the three stages of a pilgrimage. Let’s say you decide to enhance your understanding of spirituality by making a pilgrimage to Mount Kailash. For several weeks before you set out, your entire focus is on preparing for your journey—gathering the necessary clothes and equipment, packing, and then taking the long flight to Nepal. Once in Nepal, you shift into survival mode for the six-day jeep ride along bumpy dirt roads to Mount Kailash. You can hardly breathe because of the high altitude and the thick dust; the sun is blinding and the shocks on the jeep are so bad you feel like your spinal cord is being shattered. You feel hot all day, cold all night, and weak and tired most of the time. Then comes the slow, arduous climb up around Mount Kailash and back down again. During this three-day hike, you can take only one step, one breath at a time.
    At first it takes all your effort, then you find your inner rhythm, and once you do, it’s as if the mountain itself lifts you up and carries you. Upon reaching the summit, you find yourself filled with great delight and a sense of fulfillment. When you return home, it takes almost a month to recuperate. But you remember the exquisite joy you felt when you reached the peak. That sublime feeling stays with you like a sweet whisper calling you to return to your inner Self. That’s what this progressive threefold practice entails: first comes concentrated effort, known as dharana; second, the effortless flow of being there with full awareness of yourself and your entire surroundings, known as dhyana; and third, becoming one with that state of experience brought about by this effortless flow. This is known as samadhi.

    The Yoga Sutra, the central text of yoga philosophy and practice, calls these three steps samyama. By stringing dharana, dhyana, and samadhi together, the technical term samyama tells us that there is a natural process of starting our practice and reaching the goal of the practice. Most aspirants must follow this process. There is a rare exception—one that flows from complete surrender to God, which is not easy to come by. The grace of God has its own selection process. When it comes, it comes. And when it does not come, it does not come. Therefore let us focus on the three elements that depend on our human effort: dharana, dhyana, and samadhi.

    Step by Step

    The first step, dharana, is loosely translated as “concentration.” The Yoga Sutra gives a specific definition of this word: “to confine the mind or fix it in a well-defined space.” Space is infinite. Because it does not have shape, color, or form, identifying space is very difficult. Therefore, to confine the mind to a space, you have to first separate it from the rest of infinite space by putting a border around it. In discussing concentration, Vyasa, the foremost commentator on the Yoga Sutra, advises bringing the mind to a space that is well defined, such as the area around your navel center, the heart center, the center between the eyebrows, or to a particular external point, such as a flame or a particular image.

    Once you have decided to bring your mind to the center of your forehead or your heart center, for example, you must then select an object to occupy that space. The object you select—the cross, the Star of David, an image of Ganesha, a yantra, or a mantra—facilitates the mind’s ability to stabilize itself in the confines of that space. Yet when you focus your mind on that object, you’ll soon notice that it is also contacting many other objects in addition to the one you have chosen. In other words, the mind is distracted.

    Distraction is the mind’s tendency to contact various objects at a fast speed and forget both the main object it was supposed to be aware of and the space in which it was supposed to be confined. Rather than giving in to the habit of distraction, bring your mind back to the chosen object and allow your mind to focus on that. By repeatedly practicing this process of bringing the mind back, you will develop a habit of maintaining that object in your mind field for a longer period. If the object of concentration stays in your mind for a longer period of time than the objects that distract you, you have achieved a state of concentration. Concentration and distraction flow side by side. The only difference is that one stream—the stream of concentration—is stronger, heavier, fuller than the other. That defines concentration. It’s not that your mind is no longer becoming distracted, but that the object of concentration stays in your mind longer than the distracting objects do.

    As concentration matures, it turns into meditation, or dhyana. This is the second step. Meditation begins when the process of focusing your mind on the object occupying that space is not interrupted by any other thoughts, or the mind stays on that object for a long period of time without much interruption. So dhyana is a continuation of dharana; your meditation is a more mature state of your concentration.

    Students often wonder at what point the process of concentration turns into meditation. Many saints and yogis say that if your mind remains concentrated on one object for at least 12 breaths, you have achieved a state of meditation. If within that 12-breath period, your mind shifts from one object to another object, you are still at the stage of concentration. Think of oil pouring from one container to another container. Oil is thick and viscous so it pours out in an unbroken stream. The unbroken flow of your stream of awareness is meditation. And when this process of unbroken awareness lengthens further, it matures into the third step, samadhi.

    Samadhi dawns when your mind becomes completely absorbed in the object occupying the space to which you have confined it. In samadhi, the process of concentration, the object of concentration, and the mind that is trying to concentrate or meditate all have become one. The mind is no longer focusing on the object in an objective manner. All that remains in awareness is the content, the essence, of that object. In other words, in samadhi you are aware only of the essence and not of the details. For example, if you have been meditating on the cross, you are no longer aware that it is made of the finest ebony or is covered with gold. All that remains is awareness that it is an object laden with a great sense of sanctity and divinity, that it indicates your relationship with that higher divinity. That feeling is there—that is all. And in that feeling it appears as if the object does not have any form of its own. It is totally devoid of any form. All that remains is pure awareness. That’s called samadhi.

    Let’s examine the difference between meditation and samadhi. In meditation you are fully one-pointed, but that one-pointedness simply refers to the fact that your mind is focused on one object. When you analyze it, you see that deep down, the mind is not perfectly one-pointed. In meditation you are still aware of yourself as a meditator and at the same time you are aware of the object of meditation and of the process of meditation. So three things are going on continuously in your mind: (1) you know you are meditating, (2) you know on what you are meditating, and (3) you know you are the meditator. However, you have only one mind and that mind cannot be broken into pieces. It’s not that one part of your mind is on yourself, and another part is on the meditative objective. It’s a matter of intensity. When you are meditating you are more intensely aware of the object of your meditation, for example, than you are of either yourself or the process of meditating. So one stream is the major stream flowing in your mind field and the other two streams are secondary.

    In samadhi, the process of concentration, the object of concentration, and the mind that is trying to concentrate or meditate all have become one.

    As you practice focusing the mind on the object of your meditation, eventually your awareness becomes so focused on that object that not the tiniest part is left to analyze, feel, and think that you are the meditator and this is the process of meditation. It requires an exclusive absorption in the object of your meditation for these three streams to merge. That is why in English samadhi is called “spiritual absorption.” No part of your mind is left to maintain the awareness of anything other than the object of your meditation. Then neither internal nor external causes distract you. You are simply in a state of deep stillness, tranquility. And that state may last 30 seconds or two minutes (much longer when you become well practiced), and then suddenly you become aware of some external sound, or you think of checking your e-mail, or you remember you have to meet someone, and you slip from samadhi and become outwardly oriented. You realize you are sitting on your meditation cushion and you still have some practice time remaining, so then you start all over again, making an effort to go from concentration to meditation to samadhi.

    If you have been practicing for a long time it does not take too long to get back to a heightened state. It may take just a fraction of a second for you to fall from samadhi to concentration, but you can also climb back up very quickly if you have gained maturity in your practice. If not, it may take some time, even though the memory of that joyful state of samadhi is still there, and the passage to reach there is also very fresh in your memory. Your daily practice reinforces the joyful experience of samadhi, making your memory stronger, clearer, and deeper, thus enabling you to retrieve that memory at will. The memory pertaining to the experience of samadhi empowers you to reach samadhi faster and more effortlessly. That is why consistent daily practice is the way to reach and retain the experience of samadhi.

    Signs of Spiritual Progress

    Before you enter a state of samadhi, there is a thrill of experiencing stillness. And there are experiences which go with stillness that may distract you, such as clairvoyance or extraordinary sensory experiences. These experiences are called siddhis—yogic accomplishments for those who have never experienced samadhi, and obstacles for those who have experienced it. These siddhis, regardless of how profound or shallow they are, how meaningful or meaningless, are signs that you are on your way to samadhi. As a practitioner, you should not be anxious about these signs nor should you have any fear if these signs appear. Simply keep your focus on your destination, your main goal, which is samadhi itself. Furthermore, anxiety regarding when you are going to reach there, doubt about whether or not you will reach there, fear of never reaching there, and worry about what will happen to you and your loved ones if you do reach there are the breeding grounds for distraction. Not making a big deal about samadhi and yet striving to reach it in the most natural manner is the way to protect the mind from all possible distractions. That is why yogis say, “Work hard but take it lightly. Achieve the highest but don’t make a fuss about it.” This attitude, called vairagya (dispassion or non-attachment), is necessary for protecting and nurturing your practice.

    You have heard it said that practice makes perfect. But it is important to remember that it is only perfect practice that makes you perfect. Building a practice can be compared with building a house. A house can be small or big, simple or elaborate. A house can be fitted with lots of amenities or can lack even the most basic facilities. Such is the case with a practice. It can be profound or shallow. It can be designed to take us all the way to samadhi or simply conform to cultural expectations. The function of the practice determines the form. The loftier the form and the grander the goal and objective, the more detailed the architectural plan must be.

    The most important aspect of this plan is building a foundation that is capable of supporting the structure you wish to erect. The fundamentals of any fruitful practice are those from the Bhagavad Gita delineated earlier: balanced diet, balanced exercise, balanced thinking, balanced sleep, and performing our actions with balanced understanding. Next comes cultivating a conducive posture. The posture most conducive to our practice is one in which the head, neck, and trunk are in a straight line, the shoulders are relaxed, and the breath serene. Then comes uniting our mind and breath with each other. Uniting the forces of our breath and mind allows us to concentrate with the fewest distractions, thus enabling us to concentrate for a longer period of time on our chosen object. Prolonged concentration matures into meditation, and meditation matures into samadhi. The repeated experience of dharana, dhyana, and samadhi deepens our memory of samadhi.

    In subsequent practice sessions, this memory both pushes us toward samadhi and pulls samadhi toward us. There comes a time when this process becomes absolutely effortless. This effortless state of samadhi is called dharma megha samadhi, a samadhi laden with a cloud of virtues—spiritually uplifting and enlightening experiences. From this emerges an indescribable state of awareness devoid of all desires, including the desire for any benefit from samadhi other than samadhi itself. This is the state of nirbija samadhi—the highest samadhi, which sages like Patanjali and Buddha experienced. May we, their students, one day also attain this luminous experience.
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    Sat1176 got a reaction from tva prasad in What is the "Void" that author is referring to here ?   
    I agree he is probably referring to the state of Sunn Smaadh. Sant Waryam Singh / Sant Isher Singh ji also refer to similar voids that need to be crossed. I will try and dig out the relevant passages.
    This diagram is my attempt in trying to understand the path as described by Bhai Sewa Singh Ji Tharmala via Gurbani and how the mind has to cross these stages. (It still might be wrong but it what I understand at the present time). From the stages of Sunn "Naam/Shabad" pulls you out carries you across.

    Mind is stuck in thoughts of TreGun Maya (Rajo Gun, Tamo Gun and Sato Gun) Tregun/Thoughts/1st Bhavsagar is crossed with the aid of the Gur-shabad/Gur-mantar When trying to exit the Tregun maya one will have to cross the 5 elements (Air, Water, Fire, Earth, Space). 5th, Space is also known as the beginning of Sunn. One eventually enters Nij Sunn where one has to wait. Eventually a loud Shabad/Blast manifests. If one can latch onto this blast with their surti then they are carried across into Anhad Sunn (realm of panj shabad). The Sunn stage is a difficult to cross as one call fall back into dreams or hallucinations (2nd BhavSagar). From Anhad Sunn the sounds eventually merge to form a single tone called Naam/Naad. With pure clean surti/consciousness attached to this Naam/Naad one eventually merges with Waheguru  
     
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    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Meditation - My Experiance, Am I Allowed To Share?   
    Shabad Jot Da Khel. Why we can't see when we fall asleep.
     
     
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    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Meditation - My Experiance, Am I Allowed To Share?   
    Brilliant walkthrough on Gurmantar jaap and heading towards anhad. Highly recommended.
     
     
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    Sat1176 got a reaction from Jageera in Concentration, Attention & Self-Surrender   
    THE FINAL MOMENTS
    In the same way as they struggle to be born into this world, human beings also struggle to be born into the next. The way they quit their bodies at this monumental instant, when the future is at stake for them, depends on the way they have lived their lives and might be compared to that of newborns who labor to emerge from their mothers’ wombs. While the dying are trying to take their last breath, a vertiginous question, not formulated in words, rises up from the depths of their being.  “What have I done with my life? What have I been occupied with throughout my existence? Where am I going now?”
    The suffering that precedes death and the fear of the unknown that they helplessly undergo at that fatal moment—when their future destiny is being decided—can be considerably relieved if, through a serious spiritual practice, they have come to know the other aspect of their double nature, which transcends temporal existence and to which they have already learned to abandon themselves.
    It is only insofar as the aspirant is capable of consenting to let go of everything, to die to herself, and to abandon herself to something higher within her during her meditation sessions that she will be able to abandon herself to death without resisting when that ultimate moment comes for her.
    When unenlightened human beings come to the very last moments of their lives and begin to feel the approach of death, they become, most often, strangely strong within themselves and cling to their earthly bodies tenaciously, even frenziedly. At that dramatic moment when they are battling with an invisible adversary, they find within themselves—despite all their infirmities and their physical and emotional suffering—an astonishing strength to prolong their existence, which only increases their distress. However, death is an implacable god, who once his prey is seized, does not let it go before having pulled it into his enigmatic world.
    It must be noted that, despite the fact that human beings cannot help continually seeing around them the inevitable end of all that has known a beginning (whether that be a human, an animal, or a plant), yet, when their own lives approach their term, they resist their departure with surprising obstinacy. When one lights a candle, one knows perfectly well that its flame cannot last eternally or, if one delights in some food that one likes, one certainly does not expect it to be inexhaustible, so why do people hope, against all logic, that their bodies will be the exception to this rule?
    * * *
    As long as human beings remain imprisoned within themselves and their fear of the unknown before the ordeal of their physical death and they cling to their old, worn-out bodies, which have become useless to them at this inevitable moment, the door that leads to the Light of their Celestial Being remains closed to them.
    If, during their lives, they have not undertaken the necessary step allowing them to recognize the Superior Aspect of their double nature, which transcends material existence, then they will only ever see themselves as a fragile body, made up only of flesh and bone, conditioned by the flow of time, and continually prey to external dangers that lie in wait for it. Consequently, all contact with the outside world will awaken within them a conscious or unconscious fear, which will continue to grow as they age. Without being conscious of it, they will, in the end, experience everything as a threat to their physical envelopes, which they will believe to be themselves and without which they will be persuaded that they will cease to be. This is the reason why they will try to cling on to their old bodies, without which they will be lost and disoriented, but which they will, nonetheless, have to leave behind them. An intense fear will overwhelm them then and they will struggle, albeit uselessly, against the inevitable.
    At the end of this dramatic struggle, which will seem to the dying like the occurrence of an immense cosmic dissolution, they will begin to cross the bridge between life and death, an intermediary passage (or a “neutral” state of being) where they will be confronted with the Light of a Clear Consciousness that they have always carried within them, without ever having apprehended it.
    At this crucial moment, they will find themselves, so to speak, on a long road, one end of which leads towards the world of the senses, which they are leaving behind them, while the other end, which seems to disappear into a mysterious mist, goes towards the Life beyond time and space. People who are not enlightened will infallibly look behind, in the direction of the earthly life they are quitting, with painful yearning and, as they will not understand the world of the Infinite, which will stretch before them (but which, in fact, is within them), they will contemplate it with fear. It will seem to them to be a terrifying void towards which they will feel helplessly drawn and into which they will believe they will disappear forever.
    It is necessary to come back to the strange phenomenon existing in the Universe and in all Creation, which consists in wanting to repeat or relive what has already happened or already been experienced at a given moment. Once people have known an agreeable sensation, performed an action, or even had a simple thought, an uncontrollable desire to want to reproduce those sensations, actions, and thoughts installs itself in them. As they repeat them, they can no longer help seeking to relive them or rethink them, to the point where these actions, these thoughts, and these sensations finally engender in them an irresistible impulse that they can no longer rid themselves of—unless they set themselves to a serious spiritual practice and come to know themselves and to know the superior aspect of their double nature.
    Consequently, as soon as they think, do, or feel anything whatsoever, attachment to what becomes familiar to them installs itself in them. The constant repetition of what they think, do, or feel conditions them and, if these actions, thoughts, or emotions are of an undesirable nature, it closes to them the door that opens onto vaster inner perspectives and other dimensions that transcend the world of the senses. Thus they remain fearful of the unknown and cling to the only impressions they are familiar with, which prevents them being new and open to new forms of knowledge that are inaccessible to the average human being.
    Without knowing it, human beings imprison themselves in what they are accustomed to feel and to know, which will inevitably condition the final thoughts and final desires that they will take with them at the moment of their death, which thoughts and desires will determine the level of being and consciousness to which they will inevitably gravitate.
    Thus, their future destiny will be determined by the penchants that their predominant thoughts and desires will have soldered into them throughout their sojourn on this Earth.
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