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  1. The universality of one and all as per the Sri Akal-Ustat. Inscribed by Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji as a profound analyzation of the divine theatre, the Sri Akal-Ustat is a Bani housed in the Sri Dasam Granth which provides a spiritual perception of unity and oneness. Despite his martial and regal status, Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh was foremost a divine soul and subsequently viewed creation as an extrapolation of one divine master. The latter is evident from an incident, during his battles with Aurangzeb, where captains of his forces detained and presented a Sikh named Kanihyaa before him. When he queried as to Kanihyaa's crime, he was briefed that the latter was tending to Khalsa military personnel as well as Mughals thus prolonging the war through his pseudo-humanitarian efforts. Turning to the accused the Guru requested a defence from him, and Kanihyaa in all humility replied that in both Khalsa and Muslims alike he perceived the divine radiance of the Guru; thus he was assisting none other than his master. Historians record that the Guru is said to have cried with laughter at this tenure and embraced Kanihyaa, citing that the latter truly had grasped the fundamentals of reality and transcended the superficial norms of creation itself! Eastern mystics have evidenced that the lay cause of misery is the mind. The mind cannot be categorised as being a physical organ, but an accepted element which exists. The mind is essentially what processes varied perceptions to birth individuality and experience, it is a subtle psychological battery which consumes an individual's environment to birth unique traits. Plausibly the greatest exegesis of the mind's dichotomous nature emerges from the Bhagvad Gita, a Vedic tome which records the Athenian spirituality of Krishna, a demi-deity who fell during the bloody battle of Kurukshetra. Remonstrating with an apathetic Arjuna, who refuses to combat his own kin, Krishna spells out for him the pre-requisite of obtaining a spiritually illuminated Guru who can assist in imprisoning the mind. 'The mind if controlled is the greatest ally, but if left unchained evolves into the ultimate foe.' (1) In Sri Akal-Ustat Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji transcends this philosophy and instead depicts a mind which has been fully re-moulded, and a spiritually illumined being has garnered a fresh perspective on his leaden surroundings. Such was Kanihyaa's perspective. A master of prose, Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji's signature style of medium yet effective statements pre-dominate the Sri Akal-Ustat. It follows the parallel principles of Sri Jaap Sahib which can be summarised via the following stanza: 'Despite being a singular being, thou appear as being many parenting innumerable forms. After indulging in this play of creation, thou will be single and the same again.' (2) The Supreme Lord Akal is above any divisions and senses. He is male, female yet neither. For him time is not an obstacle as he is not bound by it's demarcations. Time itself is a signature child of the human mind, the created entity. It can be devised as encapsulating three perpetual stages of existence. The past, the present and the future. The Khalsa ethos lays extreme emphasis upon the present which is the principle birthing point of the future. Whilst attempting any contemplation or meditative activity the mind wavers between the past and the future, it adopts events and re-structures them to psychologically effect the contemplative personality. Subsequently an individual is left feeling that his spiritual efforts warrant no merit. Yet as the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji declares, one must become a gardener to subdue the time-travelling mind. As a gardener the human being should plant the seed of contemplation and of residing in the present in his/her respective mind. 'Kabeer plant the seeds of such a plant, which shall bear fruit throughout the twelve months.' (3) Such a plant of contemplation earnestly brings results throughout the year, and perpetually ensconces an individual in the divine presence. Kabeer further provides a supporting statement in evidence of his figurative citation, 'let sincere faith be your genuflection in prayer, and let the conquering of your mind be your supreme objective.' (4) Essaying the Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Bhai Gurdass judiciously concludes that, 'the lord always moves in the present and never ignores contemporary situations and incidents.' (5) To provide an essence of all these spiritual gems, and pay tribute to both the lord and his suppliants, Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji manifested the Akal-Ustat. Commencing with an ode to the singularity and dominance of the lord, Akal he commences to describe the latter's residence in his own creation. Arising above the conflicts of both Hindus and Muslims, he repeatedly states 'at times thou cry out loud for the Islamic prayers, and at times though observes great secrecy in reciting the Hindu mantras.' (6) The lord here is not confined to any one religious notion, nor does the Guru favour one faith above the other. His intent is to demonstrate how the lord via his own divine will manifests at times as a Hindu and at times as a Muslim. The latter notion even today is taboo for both faiths who spearhead campaigns for their own respective growths and vilify the other. But the lord is not only confined to residence in mankind alone, he also permeates nature as well. 'At times adopting the guise of a flower thou is righteously puffed up, whereas at times becoming a black bee thou is inebriated with the flower.' (7) Even in the predator and prey, flower and insect, mountain and river the lord manifests himself. Thus there is no element which is devoid of his presence. Essaying the Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji adopts various quotes from the latter canon in his spiritual treatise. When the mind is restricted, when it is controlled, perception reaches such a state that duality becomes extinct for it. The Guru Granth Sahib Ji propounds 'no one is intelligent, and no one is foolish. Your will determines all and everything.' (8) Adopting the educational parameters present in the latter quote, Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji inscribes 'Oh lord! Somewhere you become conscious, somewhere you become careless and thou sleepest unconsciously.' (9) Acknowledging the societal gap prevalent between different castes and classes, the Guru unites each faction in a single whole via declaring 'Somewhere you become a beggar and beg for alms. Yet somewhere you become a Supreme Donor and bestow the beggar with wealth.' (10) Simultaneously the Guru Granth Sahib Ji says,'some are givers and some are beggars. This is all your wondrous theatre.' (11) It was this divine perspective which Bhai Kanhiyaa possessed and which penultimately granted him liberation, thus the Sikh should foster such divinity in his mind for liberation. Sources: (1) The Bhagvad Gita. (2) Jaap Sahib, pg. 14, Sri Dasam Granth. (3) Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, pg. 1376. (4) ibid, pg. 84. (5) Bhai Gurdas Vaars, Vaar 18, Pauri 21. (6) Sri Akal-Ustat, Sri Dasam Granth. (7) ibid, pg. 96. (8) Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, pg. 98. (9) Sri Akal Ustat, Sri Dasam Granth, pg. 36. (10) ibid, pg. 36. (11) Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, pg. 11. http://tisarpanth.blogspot.co.nz/2014/03/the-righteous-perception.html?view=timeslide
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