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amardeep

Arabian Nights And Charitropakhyaan

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14 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

She didn’t tell 1001 stories but spread the stories out over 1001 nights. 

I think there are some 300 odd stories. 

At the end of the telling she had borne the King 3 children (1001 nights is almost 3 years) and then she asked the king whether there was any justice in killing the mother of young children so the King rescinded the sentence on her.

Apparently the original had 1000 tales.

Source: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101219080335AAKMNjE 

Doesn't really matter,  though. We can still compare. 

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12 hours ago, amardeep said:

Is there anything to suggest that Arabian nights was read and studied in Mughal India ?

There was a popular show called "Alif Layla" on TV,  I remember watching it when I was young. So I think they were read in mughal India and probably afterwards, too. 

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6 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

I think it definitely would have been, seeing as the stories were from around India region, and also with it being a persian work I would say it would have been part of the language culture in the moghal darbar.

The original was written in Arabic. It might have been translated to Persian, though.

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On 10/6/2018 at 2:08 AM, tva prasad said:

Apparently the original had 1000 tales.

Source: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101219080335AAKMNjE 

Doesn't really matter,  though. We can still compare. 

I had originally thought it was 1001 stories with one story ending and one beginning every night.

 

On 10/6/2018 at 2:20 AM, tva prasad said:

The original was written in Arabic. It might have been translated to Persian, though.

Cool. Never knew that.

 

17 hours ago, amardeep said:

The Aladin was not part of the original manuscript but was added by the Europeans in the 18th century 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aladdin

Great info. Wonder why the priest added it. Or did it replace a story? Or was it just a really good story to include?

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Books like these have been added to over the years as never-ending stories.  You see the same in Sanskrit books where there are different layers of historical inputs.  Pyara Singh Padam says the same about the panj sau sakhi - originally begun in the Anandpur darbaar and then kept being added to over the decades.  

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Though I doubt the Sikhs ever did this due to the sacredness of Dasam Granth , - there are some 'editorial comments' in large sections of Dasam bani where it states that "if the poets find any errors, please correct and improve upon this Work'. I assume this is a literary tradition of humbleness in Indian literature, but it opens up the possibility of open-ended writings that can keep being added to.   I think this is why Pyara Singh regards the Panj Sau Sakhi as one such example as it contains many sakhis that deal with the invasions of Nadir Shah etc. 

 

Edited by amardeep

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23 hours ago, amardeep said:

"if the poets find any errors, please correct and improve upon this Work'

Where else have you seen any religious titan state the above in his composition?

Thanks

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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24 minutes ago, paapiman said:

Where else have you seen any religious titan state the above in his composition?

Thanks

 

Bhul chuk maaf

I haven't seen it elsewhere. Thats why I said I assume that this might have been an Indian poetic tradition that Maharaj was following  (in the same way he followed the Indian tradition of writing in dohra, kabits, various chands etc.)

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1 hour ago, chatanga1 said:

Found a mention of an alternative text in Persian based on Arabian Nights (page 13) :

1606363434_Theorientaltale.thumb.png.9e97b14f2608d2234f82d6540e05417b.png

Great good find !. I’ve got the Arabian nights in 6 volumes, will begin to read it shortly.  I think the Panch Tantra might be a even closer sibling to the Charitro Pakhyan and we know through manuscript evidence that this was translated in the Guru Darbaar and thereby familiar to the Sikhs 

Edited by amardeep

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I want to share these similarities betweeen Arabian nights and Sri CharitroPakhyan Granth:

1 - A description of women as fair as the moon

2 - Traders being commonly used as characters

3 - Says jewellers are not to be trusted

4 - in one story, the Queen is fearful that the King being unable to produce a child will end the royal dynasty, so she moves to get herself pregnant and has the child announced as the Kings own

5 - In one story, a man is told that his friend wanst to castrate him

6 - A place between two rivers also features as the setting for stories

7 - a wide variety of places is used from Egypt all the way to China

8 - the story where the man climbs the tree and sees his wife canoodling with her lover at the bottom

9 - the status of characters frequently involves Caliphs, Qazis, and Wazirs...

10 - there is a man mentioned in whose city the people especially women, throng the the castle for a glimpse of his beauty

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1 hour ago, chatanga1 said:

I want to share these similarities betweeen Arabian nights and Sri CharitroPakhyan Granth:

1 - A description of women as fair as the moon

2 - Traders being commonly used as characters

3 - Says jewellers are not to be trusted

4 - in one story, the Queen is fearful that the King being unable to produce a child will end the royal dynasty, so she moves to get herself pregnant and has the child announced as the Kings own

5 - In one story, a man is told that his friend wanst to castrate him

6 - A place between two rivers also features as the setting for stories

7 - a wide variety of places is used from Egypt all the way to China

8 - the story where the man climbs the tree and sees his wife canoodling with her lover at the bottom

9 - the status of characters frequently involves Caliphs, Qazis, and Wazirs...

10 - there is a man mentioned in whose city the people especially women, throng the the castle for a glimpse of his beauty

Awesome. Good stuff 

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