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Learning To Read Write Gurmukhi/panjabi - Tips On Getting Started

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You have to be careful here. Are you trying to say "He teaches me" (as in question: Who teaches you? you point at the teacher and answer "HE teaches me")

OR

are you trying to say "He IS teaching me" (that it is happening right now)? There is a difference.

ਉਹ ਮੈਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਂਦਾ ਹੈ l He teaches me.
ਉਹ ਮੇਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾ ਰਿਹਾ ਹੈ l He is teaching me.

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Good reply Bhagat Singh Ji,

I was looking for the present simple tense, so "He teaches me" was the sentence I was inquiring about. "He is teaching me" is present continious tense.

So the correct sentence should be (1 or 2).

1) ਉਸਨੇ ਮੈਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਦਾ ਹੈ l

2) ਉਹ ਮੈਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਂਦਾ ਹੈ l

So the only thing in question is which form of "he" to use.

1) ਉਸਨੇ

2) ਉਹ

ਉਹ + ਨੇ = ਉਸਨੇ

The reason I use the postposition ਨੇ is because "teach" is a transitive verb and "he" is the nominative in this sentence. However, ਉਹ without ਨੇ would be correct if used with an intransitive verb, such as "speaks". For example, ਉਹ ਬੋਲਦਾ ਹੈ l

I understand ਨੇ can also be used as an emphasizer. However, my reason for adding it was to make my sentence grammatically correct. According to the gramnar rules, the subject of the sentence must have a case marker when it is the agent of a transitive verb.

I am learning though and I may be wrong. Personally, I like the sentence, "ਉਹ ਮੈਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਂਦਾ ਹੈ l" (the one Bhagat Singh Ji suggested)

Maybe the case marker ਨੇ is not applicable here.

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Nope it's not applicable. We can take these sentences and they would still be correct without ਮੈਨੂੰ.

ਉਹ ਮੈਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਂਦਾ ਹੈ l He teaches me. > ਉਹ ਪੜ੍ਹਾਉਂਦਾ ਹੈ l He teaches.
ਉਹ ਮੇਨੂੰ ਪੜ੍ਹਾ ਰਿਹਾ ਹੈ l He is teaching me. > ਉਹ ਪੜ੍ਹਾ ਰਿਹਾ ਹੈ l He is teaching.

Edited by BhagatSingh

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#Update:

Resources.

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Update:

Great blog for new learners, talks of trials and epiphanies of learning Gurmukhi/Panjabi.

http://sohnikaur.tumblr.com/

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Article on what happens in our brains when we learn a second language:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/sep/04/what-happens-to-the-brain-language-learning

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N30, can we make this a sticky?

 

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Hello all

This is a  opportunity for all. Especially for kids. 

"Forwarding as received "

 

Waheguruji ka khalsa Waheguruji ki Fateh🙏🏻

*Sikhi Sikhya Gur Vichar*

Sangatji,

Gurusaheb ji's blessings & support from all Sangat, all the volunteers are again ready for a sewa. 21st June, coming Sunday we are planning to start with the gurmat classes, but they are little change in the timings. If you are already a part of the group then it's ok, if somebody new is interested to join please join the group as per the sewa you are interested in. Classes will be only on Sundays on the said time. With every group name the timing is written so please join the whatsApp group as per the sewa you want to be a part of.

1. *Basic's Oral learning for small Kid's* 
Group timing's : *4pm to 5pm*
Volunteers : Bhagatpreet Kaur & Avleen Kaur 

Group Link :-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/GoaL1GollaqJKEYP5aIQEI

 


2. *Basic Oral learning for Small kids.*

Group timing's : *6 pm to 7pm*
Volunteers : Gurjas Kaur & Gurleen Kaur
Group Link:-

https://chat.whatsapp.com/CuBAnB87LPK6OkrsaFZPgz

 


3. *Basic's of Gurmukhi Aakhar written with Matra's*

Group timing's : *5pm - 6pm*
Volunteers: Harjinder Kaur & Manjit Kaur
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/IZepMgeKuSj6s5NrUTbch4

 


3. *Nitnem Baani's*

Group timing's : *1.30 to 2.30pm*
Volunteers : Pritpal Singh 
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/IBMqZQUVmus1k8Zc2hvBRh

 

4. *Nitnem Baani's 😘

Group timing's : *3pm - 4pm.*
Volunteers : Arneet Kaur & Dilprit Kaur
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/I24PxNBVkV2DsCdmmLDy1m

 


5. *Baani Reading Sukhmani Saheb & Aasa di Vaar*

Group timing's : *12pm - 1pm*
Volunteers : Gurmeet Kaur (Rani Didi)
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/GfRsgNesVX0L2LzsEwXAKA

 

 6. *5 Granthi Baani's
Volunteers : Saheb Singh, Sarabjeet Singh.
Timings : *2.30pm - 3.30pm*
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/JjZy7pHsya6L2GW7sGW5I9

 


7. *Sahejpath Santhya*

Group timing's : *4pm - 5pm*
Volunteers : Abhijyot Singh, Teja Singh Virji, Jaspal Singh & Sarabjit Singh.
Group Link:-
https://chat.whatsapp.com/HaqOcdre1EWLQLEH3pXs1D

 


It's a request, *Please join the group where you are interested in attending the class. Please just don't join for the sake of joining* it's a request please

 Bhulchuk di maafi bakshna ji🙏🏻

Waheguruji ka khalsa Waheguruji ki Fateh.

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In my opinion. For a complete new foreign learner (who is primarily learning for Sikhi), they should not start by learning the Punjabi language and grammar itself, but jump right into Gurbani.

They should first learn to read and write the Gurmukhi letter, and the primary sounds, which is easy. Then they can just start listening to shabads they like or gurbani online, and read alongside. After they improve and they will fast, they can start speaking alongside as well. After they can read, listen, and speak relatively well, learning what the words means is easy and the knowledge of grammar comes on its own primarily. This is a very intuitive method. All you need is consistency. 

Compare this to learning Punjabi and the grammar and the language first is quite hard, and personally I wouldn't recommend it. 

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8 hours ago, kidsama said:

In my opinion. For a complete new foreign learner (who is primarily learning for Sikhi), they should not start by learning the Punjabi language and grammar itself, but jump right into Gurbani.

They should first learn to read and write the Gurmukhi letter, and the primary sounds, which is easy. Then they can just start listening to shabads they like or gurbani online, and read alongside. After they improve and they will fast, they can start speaking alongside as well. After they can read, listen, and speak relatively well, learning what the words means is easy and the knowledge of grammar comes on its own primarily. This is a very intuitive method. All you need is consistency. 

Compare this to learning Punjabi and the grammar and the language first is quite hard, and personally I wouldn't recommend it. 

You are 100% correct and spot on as i went through this phase as well a few years ago when i started on path for reading gurbani paath banis. 

 

The whole attitude of learning Punjabi Gurmuki before doing basic panj bani nitnem for a new starter is very very hard luckly i got through by roman english scripts which was a blessing for me otherwise i would been without any banis at all.

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23 hours ago, kidsama said:

In my opinion. For a complete new foreign learner (who is primarily learning for Sikhi), they should not start by learning the Punjabi language and grammar itself, but jump right into Gurbani.

They should first learn to read and write the Gurmukhi letter, and the primary sounds, which is easy. Then they can just start listening to shabads they like or gurbani online, and read alongside. After they improve and they will fast, they can start speaking alongside as well. After they can read, listen, and speak relatively well, learning what the words means is easy and the knowledge of grammar comes on its own primarily. This is a very intuitive method. All you need is consistency. 

Compare this to learning Punjabi and the grammar and the language first is quite hard, and personally I wouldn't recommend it. 

I would agree, but what I found was that not pronouncing the silent grammatical indicators in Gurbani, can easily thrown one off and makes learning harder. That's why I would start by focusing on starting with learning the sounds of the letters and vowel symbols with simple Panjabi sentences and words which don't have the silent symbols - to consolidate that learning first. It's also usually more easier to find someone who can help you with this too.

In my experience, this was simpler than starting with Gurbani first. And to be honest, when I wrote the OP, I mainly had Panjabi speakers in mind.

 

That being said, I think one of the best ways to progress after you've got some grasp of the script (lippi) is to jump straight into Jaap Sahib with recordings - I found the slow recitation of Giani Thakur Singh especially useful for this. It's sort of jumping straight into the deep end, but if you persevere the progression is good and the repetition within that bani helps aid learning, as does the complexity. And when doing this you don't really need to focus on the actually meaning of the words, just the correct mapping of the sounds (phonemes) with symbols (graphemes).           

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