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These few chapters I read will become the most profound you will ever read on topic of Anhad Naad Sangat ji. MUST MUST READ!!!

It's long but definitely worth it. 😉

If this doesn't inspire anyone to start walking on the path of naam, anhad or whatever else you want to call it then nothing will. I suppose the real question we have to all ask ourselves, myself included, is do we really want to wake up????

 

Nada

 

Part 1

 

Among the various methods of meditation practiced in ancient India to this end was a very important one called Nada Yoga, Yoga of the Sound. The science of this form of meditation seems either totally lost or inaccessible today. It appears impossible, at any rate, to find anyone who has practiced it and has sufficient knowledge of its highly subtle and intricate details to be able to teach it. Its technique will be explained to whatever extent possible in the five chapters that follow; and, because of its profound mystical significance, it will be referred to from time to time throughout the rest of the book, particularly in the chapters on Hatha Yoga. The value of this form of meditation cannot be overstated, especially for those who do not yet know where their attention should be directed, and who thus experience great difficulty retaining their concentration during meditation.

 

Having taken his meditation posture, and prepared himself mentally and physically—by quieting his mind, relaxing, and feeling a deep global sensation of his body—the seeker should now decide firmly not to move any more. Closing his eyes, he should remain as still as possible, listening internally with sustained attention. If he can be inwardly quiet enough and deeply absorbed in the search, he will, if he is truly persistent, suddenly become aware of an unusual, feeble sound that can be heard deep inside the ears and head, concealed from him before and obscured by the din of his incessant mental restlessness. When the aspirant has become aware of the mysterious presence in him of this sound, he may at first be struck with surprise and awe, but no matter how weak or distant it may appear, it will be very obvious that this is no ordinary sound but a mystical one of a higher cosmic order. It could be called the primordial sound.

 

If, at this stage, the seeker can succeed in remaining sufficiently alert and aware while maintaining his effort of intense concentration, he cannot possibly fail to observe that this sound has an extraordinarily uninterrupted continuity about it, a crystal-like vibration that resembles the noise of the ocean with many other different “ultra” sounds superimposed on it.

 

When the aspirant is fully engrossed in his meditation and is sufficiently freed from the grip of his lower self, he will perceive that the more he rises to, and becomes merged in, the higher levels of his consciousness, the louder and more shrill (high-pitched and piercing) the sound will get. He will also begin to note with wonder that this sound has a curious unearthly sparkle about it, somewhat reminiscent of the flickering light of a star, so that it seems almost imperceptibly to oscillate continuously inside his head. In the beginning, he will have to be very finely tuned indeed to catch all its subtle heavenly scintillations (i.e. flash or sparkle of light), fragile movements, and the highly delicate changes of its “ultra-tones.”

 

When the aspirant employs this Nada (inner sound) as the main support for his meditation, he must follow all its slender fluctuations, subtle variations of note, and mysterious jewel-like glitterings, second by second, with the utmost diligence. He will discover that this unusual sound with its strange vibrations, celestial twinklings, and, above all, enigmatic (difficult to interpret or understand) continuity will become a most precious support for his concentration in all his future meditations.

 

From that day onward, the frequency with which he will lose himself in his habitual self-forgetfulness and mental reveries will decrease considerably. He will be protected from blindly wandering into the territory of his enemy—his ordinary state of being and feeling—as he so often did in the beginning of his spiritual struggles.

 

The aspirant should not be surprised if, on certain days, this sound shifts to another part of the head, sometimes vibrating slightly to the right, at other times to the left, and even, on occasions, in the middle or back of the skull. All these changes take place to prevent his meditation from becoming stale and mechanical as well as to purify certain aspects of his mind.

 

The special benefit that the seeker will derive from this mystical sound is priceless. First, it will sustain him in his meditation by giving his attention something definite to hold on to and so allow him to concentrate better with little or no wavering. Second, it will have a particularly purifying and calming effect on his mind as well as his feelings. Third, it will help him, little by little, to rise to the higher and more luminous planes of his consciousness. Finally, it will become the means for an ardent and sincere aspirant to become immediately aware when his attention begins to weaken and waver during his meditation, and this higher state of consciousness in him gets diluted and mixed up again with his ordinary mind—for he will not fail to observe that, at such moments, the sound has either altogether disappeared or has lost its supernal luster and subtle ultravibrations, becoming very distant and pale.

 

When meditating with this Nada, it is essential that the aspirant always seek and follow the particular aspect of it that is most subtle and “ultra” in pitch as well as in brilliance. Even when the sound becomes very shrill (high-pitched and piercing) and loud in moments of deep concentration, he must not be tempted to be satisfied with it merely because it is sharp and resonant. He should relentlessly attempt to rise further and further into ever more subtle spheres of its mysterious invisible kingdom. Discernment (the ability to judge well) and perseverance are indispensable in this delicate and difficult work if the seeker does not want to risk stopping at that stage, losing his way, and starting to slide backward. (See the advice given in chapter 3 if you have difficulty hearing this inner sound.)

 

Later on, the aspirant must be able to turn to this inner sound at will, endeavour to hear it clearly, and try to hold on to it during his various daily activities, whether walking in the street, writing, reading, talking, or eating. When he is finally able to hear it distinctly in outer life conditions as well as during meditation, he will be astonished to perceive that, no matter how tumultuously external noises may thunder all around, they cannot obliterate this sacred sound in him, nor interfere with, nor alter in any manner the resplendent beauty of its tone and sparkling effulgence.

 

When the seeker uses this mystical sound as the principal basis and support for his meditation, he will notice that, each time he finishes meditating, there is an unusual sensation throughout the whole of his body that will feel strangely rarefied and weightless. He should appreciate the importance of this subtle physical sensation and learn to hold on to it in his active life as well. It will become an additional support to help him remember himself and remain more profoundly connected to his higher being as well as be more relaxed physically and conserve the vital force needed to nurture and keep the wheel of his spiritual work moving.

 

The aspirant should look upon this Nada as a Divine Grace and rare opportunity, always turning to it with the utmost respect, revering it as the treasured means that can make his deliverance possible. However, it must be stressed that this sound is not to be taken as an end in itself, but only as a temporary prop in his spiritual struggles. If the seeker arrives at a state of higher consciousness during his meditation, then it is to this ineffable light (too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words) that his attention must turn and in which it must be absorbed. The sound, in the end, only acts as a benign (gentle and kind) guide and support toward the greater aim.

 

 

 

Part 2

 

The first time the seeker hears this mystical sound when meditating, it may be very faint indeed—according to his level of being and ardour (great enthusiasm or passion). And, even if he has heard and recognized it, it may keep disappearing and reappearing every so often. It will—so to speak—play with the aspirant, constantly putting him on trial to test his perseverance; or it may vanish altogether, and the seeker will not hear it any more for some time. He must not be disheartened at this but persistently look for it, again and again, until he finally succeeds in hearing it once more.

The importance of this Nada (this sacred sound) cannot be stressed enough. It could be compared to a divine signpost, compassionately indicating the way to a struggling seeker in this difficult quest.

Generally, the human being’s thoughts and feelings are constantly changing. Ever tossed about by the waves of the incessant flux of his thoughts, there is no continuity of being in him. And, in his ordinary habitual state, he cannot know or even conceive what it truly means to have inner continuity of being. Without any real aim in him, he is like a dried leaf being blown helplessly hither and thither by the ever-changing winds of his inner moods, his thoughts, and his desires. And his moods, thoughts, and desires are always being influenced by external conditions as well by all sorts of unseen forces acting upon him.

When the aspirant has recognized this Nada and familiarized himself well enough with it, he will perceive that, contrary to the ever-changing inner and outer conditions that he was used to up to that moment, this mystical sound has a strange unearthly continuity about it. In addition to the description of this sound given in the previous chapter, it can also be compared to the soft whisper of the wind and the continuous hissing noise of the ocean waves, with a shrill “ultra” sound on top of it, composed of all the harmonics in the Universe. On higher spheres, this sacred Nada will have a strange sort of silvery aspect to it, somewhat similar to the uninterrupted jingling sound of very little pieces of glass, with other smaller, ever more subtle sounds superimposed on it, until finally these finer sounds seem to disappear into infinity.

In the beginning, the seeker should fix his attention on the part of the sound that is most shrill (high-pitched and piercing) and, as explained in the previous chapter, oscillating slightly somewhat like the twinkling of a star. It will be easier to hear that way. Later, when the aspirant gets more familiar with it, he will begin to hear two or more sounds at the same moment. At first he may not quite realize, or be really sure, that he is hearing two sounds simultaneously. However, if at such times he listens carefully, he will note that one of these two sounds is slightly more obvious, whereas the other is a little more high-pitched and more subtle. He should listen carefully to both sounds for a while until it becomes absolutely clear to him which of these two sounds is the more subtle and high pitched. It is to this one he must then gently let his attention turn and concentrate on. He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds any more—even though it will keep intruding and drawing him back to it.

If the seeker has reached a sufficient degree of enlightenment and is attentive enough in outer life, he will find that, in the same way as when meditating his attention is at first drawn to the sound that is more evident, so, in the outside world, people without realizing it almost always let themselves be tempted by and attracted to the more obvious aspects of life—whereas the more subtle and finer ones unfortunately escape most people most of the time. This applies to everything that people do and to which they have leanings, including the kind of friends to whom they are drawn, the sort of entertainment to which they are attracted, the things they ordinarily like, and so forth. This tendency is equally applicable to their choice in the various arts—which is very revealing of the level of their thinking and being.

The subtler and more lofty aspects of art seem always to escape the majority of people. In understanding all this, it should be apparent that, if someone is not sufficiently transformed through his spiritual struggles, and has not acquired the necessary inner discernment to deal with this tendency in him while he is still alive, then the same problem will confront him when he leaves this form of existence. He will gravitate blindly to the more obvious states, and the more subtle ones will be lost to him.

When using this mystical sound as the basic support for his meditation, the seeker should also be very alert and attentive as to where the subtler aspects of this sound are drawing him within himself. He will thus, little by little, gravitate to ever finer states of consciousness and will start to sense an out-of-the-ordinary inner continuity of being that is beyond description and that it is impossible for him to experience in his habitual state. As his meditation deepens, it will bring with it a most subtle, transparent, and luminous consciousness that he will finally become immersed in and one with. He will no longer sense himself in the same way as he did in the past. He will become mysteriously transformed into an unchanging and enigmatic “Spectator,” plunged in the vast silence of an eternal cosmic “Nowness.”

As human feelings and thoughts are generally in a constant state of flux, the mysterious continuity that this mystical sound possesses can, in very truth, “carry” the aspirant during his spiritual efforts. Especially at the beginning of his struggles—when he will encounter much opposition and difficulty within himself toward meditation—this sacred sound will be a benign blessing for him. It will also be a boon and an extraordinary prop in all his other spiritual practices as well. Through its Grace and help, he will gradually begin intuitively to understand and feel where he has to be placed in himself—and where, by habit, he never is. He will discover what it means to be.

But this is not enough—for the seeker must now try to listen to this mystical sound in his outer life activities also. He should continuously turn to it, seek it, and, with all his sincerity and might, endeavour to hear and hold on to it while talking, eating, walking, washing, and so on. Only in this way can the will of the Divine begin to manifest itself on the lower planes of being as it already does in the higher spheres—and only in this way can the seeker’s transformation, as well as the transformation of those with whom he comes into contact, start to take place.

 

Part 3

Just as it is not possible for a subject to decide on his own initiative to go and see his king when it pleases him without any preliminary preparation or authorization, and, especially, without an intermediary or a guide to escort him through the various halls and corridors of the palace leading to the royal chamber, so it is with an aspirant’s spiritual quest and his desire to reach the royal abode of his supreme Lord. Here also a seeker—unless he is very exceptional indeed—needs an intermediary between the Divine and himself, an intermediary that takes the form of the Sacred for him.

It is essential for the aspirant to understand this and clearly see the importance and value for his spiritual search of this Nada, this mystical sound that can be mysteriously heard inside the ears and head. For this Nada is an inestimable sacred intermediary between that which is higher and divine in him and his ordinary self. It is his prodigious hope, his ever-present and trustworthy friend, his necessary guide and benign support in his various spiritual exercises and meditations. In it lies the possibility for his redemption and the fulfilment of himself.

 

In the beginning of his struggles, it is an indispensable means to help him find his way inside the seemingly complicated labyrinth of his being, until he reaches the royal chamber of his supreme Lord and King. Having found it, he will marvel to see how strangely simple the way to it is after all. It had only escaped him in the past through its extraordinary simplicity. And what is still more curious is that this princely aspect of his nature—its sublime beauty and transparent purity unceasingly present in him—has always been imperceptibly and silently waiting there to receive him, secretly giving meaning to his existence without his having known it. Whenever he remembers to turn his look inward, he will always find it there, ever awake, unchanging, never affected nor sullied in any manner by anything that has taken place in his life.

 

To remain connected to the divine aspect of one’s nature necessitates at every second renunciation and “dying” to one’s customary state of being and of feeling oneself. It is a difficult thing to achieve, but if done intelligently and with understanding, this renunciation will inevitably make it more and more possible for one to live in and through one’s higher aspect, until the great moment of deliverance one day dawns, heralding the ardently longed-for liberation from bondage to one’s lower nature with its never-ending exigencies (an urgent need or demand) and tormenting cravings.

 

In the beginning of their quest, it is necessary for most people to make very great and sustained efforts with the utmost sincerity and determination. But they also need some definite thing to hold onto that can assist and guide them in this difficult spiritual journey and prevent them wandering blindly, trying to find the secret door to their True Being, hoping by chance to fall upon it. That is why this inner mystical sound is like a precious sacred rope thrown down by Divine Grace to a drowning seeker—by the aid of which he may eventually pull himself out of the dark pit of his lower nature up to the light and vast expanse of his higher consciousness.

 

Before someone can even be allowed to pass through the gates of a palace, let alone appear before his monarch, he must prepare himself in all kinds of ways. He has first to learn the necessary etiquette, clean himself, and dress in a fitting manner, thus making himself worthy of such a royal encounter. Likewise, it is necessary for an aspirant to purify himself from at least some of his undesirable tendencies, negative emotions, and warped thinking before it is possible for him to rise to higher spheres in himself and be permitted to enter and abide in such sacred regions. It should be understood that it is impossible for a seeker to climb to the higher realms of his consciousness if his being is still tainted and heavily encumbered with unprofitable worldly desires, useless fantasies, all sorts of unfulfilled dreams, and his unsound judgments and misdeeds—like so much dust that has collected on him from some remote past and his present terrestrial journey.

 

Before one can look through a window and view the light that is on the other side, one must necessarily clean it first. Similarly, the cleaning and ordering of the aspirant’s inner “home” are imperative—at least to some extent—before he can be authorized to have access to sacred territories within him and contemplate the Sublime beyond his limited, ordinary self. Otherwise, as stated earlier, each time he attempts to rise in himself, he will simply be flung down again to the state that conforms to his level of being. Furthermore, he will keep suffering from this condition, without at first understanding its true cause, until a sufficient degree of transformation has finally taken place in him to allow him to maintain himself in these luminous regions for longer periods at a time without losing them so easily as before.

 

When the seeker concentrates on this inner mystical sound during his meditation, it acts as a sacred intermediary between him and the Sublime in himself, indicating the way and, at the same time, helping free him from identification with his lower nature, drawing him further and further away from it to the higher realms of his being through which the purification of his ordinary self will start taking place. The concentration on this sacred sound will occupy the aspirant’s attention in such a manner as to make it easier for him to keep away from unwanted thoughts and remain inwardly more collected and quiescent during his meditation. This will, little by little, allow another state of consciousness to begin mysteriously manifesting itself to his inner vision, a vastly different consciousness from the one he is used to in his routine existence.

 

In the beginning, this state will seem to most people to be merely a strange emptiness that they cannot comprehend. It may not mean much to some at first, while others may be disturbed and even frightened by it. Because their being is still not refined enough and prepared for such an experience, they will not be able to recognize and appreciate a thing of such profound magnitude—just as, in a similar way, an ordinary person cannot at first be expected to understand and appreciate the fineness of great works of art if his level of being is not yet sufficiently raised. However, in the case of a sincere aspirant, even though he may not yet be fully ready to understand and recognize this superior state of consciousness in him as being something of a higher cosmic order, he will, nevertheless, begin to experience an unusual peace and a feeling of remarkable well-being that will greatly help and encourage him in his future efforts.

 

If, at times, especially in the beginning, the seeker experiences some difficulty in hearing this mystical sound, then, immediately on waking up first thing in the morning, he should turn his attention inward to look for it, and listen intently. He will find it astonishingly shrill and loud at that particular hour. It will be clearly heard, oscillating gently and sparkling with such sublime beauty that, as said earlier, it may only be compared to the jewel-like twinkling light of a heavenly star.

 

It should always accompany the aspirant in his struggles, sustaining him in all his meditations and other spiritual exercises.

 

This mystical sound is like a sacred hook of Grace cast down to the seeker to help draw him away from his ordinary state of being. Getting away from his habitual way of thinking and feeling and “emptying” himself constitute the preliminary essential step to allow something of a higher order to fill the void he will have created in himself. Only in this way can the holy descent of Grace take place in him and pervade his being with its divine flame—the indispensable instrument for the purification and transformation of his lower nature, which will eventually render him worthy and strong enough to be able to stand in the presence of his supreme Monarch and bear his royal look and light without cringing.

 

When the seeker has undergone sufficient purification and transformation, and insofar as he has learned to “die” to himself, he will then inevitably rise and become merged with this effulgent light in the same way that evaporating water rises into the air and merges with it under heat from the sun.

 

 

Part 4

The aspirant must arrive at the understanding that it is not enough to have had the Grace and privilege of hearing this inner mystical sound. What is more important afterward is how he listens to it, with what aim, and what spiritual value he attaches to it for his salvation.

He will be very much helped in all this if he observes how his interest changes all the time. He will see it continuously falter, weaken, and alter its course with the slightest association of thoughts that arise in his mind. His interest has to be constantly renewed and redirected onto its intended track and main spiritual objective each time it deviates from them—and this must apply to whatever other forms of yoga the aspirant practices and whatever other means of support he uses for his attention during meditation. How the attention is directed to and poised on this sacred inner sound, and with what determination it is held there—in both duration and depth—will determine the degree of the inner spiritual freedom and spiritual light the seeker will experience during and after his meditation. And the appearance and experience of this spiritual light, as well as the exalted feeling that will follow from it, will act as a benign token, enheartening him to make yet further efforts to remain connected to this luminous aspect of his nature.

The aspirant has to teach himself always to be in a state of alert watchfulness. At any moment, robbers of all sorts can enter the doorways of his being and steal away his attention if he is not sufficiently on his guard. Then this unusual expanse of pure consciousness in him will become adulterated again and recede once more into the background. If a seeker is not wary enough, all the pleasurable or painful impressions he receives from the outside world—and especially how he receives these impressions—can often enmesh him and stick to him, leaving in him, long afterward, inner disorders, confused thoughts, and troubled feelings difficult to disentangle himself from. He must learn to become very discriminating in what he allows to enter into the gates of his being. If he is advanced enough on this spiritual path, and if he is sufficiently enlightened, he will see how impartial and unaffected he can be by certain outer impressions and how much protection he can also benefit from by remaining internally ever-attentive to the mysterious song of this sacred Nada.

Apart from his concentration on it when meditating in the seclusion of his home, by constantly seeking to hear this mystical sound in active life as well, he will gradually learn to be more distant and free from the aspect of himself that is open to temptation and vulnerable to the unprofitable outside influences that make him forget his spiritual aim. As he becomes more aware of himself and more experienced, this sound will permit him to see more rapidly when his attention is being solicited and about to be taken away from him again. It will also help him observe how his attention is being enticed by these marauders (raiders) disguised as friends.

If one could see these seducers as they really are, in their true form, there would be no problem. The trouble is that they never come openly in their real guise, but always as seemingly pleasant friends and benefactors offering dreams of future delights—most of which are in reality unattainable—or instant pleasures that could ultimately greatly hinder the aspirant’s spiritual evolution. Anything that entices, claims, and in the end totally absorbs and ensnares his attention is his real and only enemy. And, each time he forgets his supreme inner Lord and falls asleep in himself again, he commits without realizing it the most serious sin there is against his own being.

At such moments, it can truly be said that the fall of the human being is nothing more nor less than this curious forgetting of himself—that is to say, the forgetting of his higher nature and the awareness of his existence. It is in this state of self-forgetfulness that all wrong actions are performed in life.

With the aid of this mystical sound, the aspirant will have a better chance of remaining vigilant and connected to his inner Source, abiding for longer and longer periods in a state of self-recollectedness. He will ultimately come to see for himself that he is conscious of his existence solely during moments when he feels this state of inner presence. The rest of the time, when he is in his habitual state of oblivion, he feels his existence little and—according to the degree to which he is absent—may even have no awareness of it at all.

Through all this work, the aspirant, if he is sincere and serious enough, will one day suddenly discover that, without his having known it before, he is all the time living on many different planes simultaneously, and that whatever he thinks or does on a certain plane instantaneously colours and affects all the other planes for better or for worse. When, during moments of profound inner presence, the seeker is intensely touched by feelings belonging to the domain of the Sublime, they will pervade and light up all the different planes of himself from the inside toward all the outer layers of his nature in a manner of which one cannot conceive if one has not yet experienced the remarkable spiritual elevation that being present to the higher aspect of oneself confers. If the aspirant can have the strength not to give in to any bad or unprofitable external influence and impression, not allowing them to enter and colour his being, then it will be his innermost nature that will shine forth its effulgent light toward the outside of himself and fill him with its radiance.

Part 5

 

Sooner or later, the day will come when the seeker will be faced with the imperative necessity to have to make the firm decision to try to remain attentive to this sacred sound at all times—no matter where he is or in what other spiritual exercise he is engaged—until he finally succeeds in establishing in him a certain degree of inner presence. And he will have to make this effort through the full understanding of the need for it, so that there will be no unnecessary and harmful violation of himself while trying to achieve this aim.

 

This will inevitably involve the continuous renunciation of his habitual state of being, with all its ever-changing cravings, day-dreaming, and useless fancies. The aspirant will then be confronted with the vital problem of having at all moments voluntarily to agree to forego or “die” to a certain aspect of himself—at least in some measure to start with—so that something higher in him can come to the foreground of his being and occupy its place. He will clearly see how hard this renunciation is.

 

For various reasons, he may not be able to keep up such an intense and prolonged effort. He will probably in time tire of doing it, and, unknowingly, slide backward little by little, settling once more into his old habitual state of being. Without perhaps realizing it, he will then start to sleep inwardly again, thinking that he is still working by being merely satisfied with the intellectual knowledge and memory of certain limited spiritual experiences he may have had in the past.

 

If, after long, arduous, and sustained efforts, an aspirant has arrived at some degree of spiritual awakening and is not heedful enough of this particular kind of pitfall, then, owing to the self-complacency and pride that may surreptitiously install themselves in him through the little knowledge he has gleaned (making it more dangerous for him and everybody else than if he had not known anything at all on such a weighty subject), he will fritter away his further spiritual possibilities and life. Later, if, by chance, he realizes what has happened, it will be much more difficult for him to start making fresh efforts of such magnitude again.

 

There can be no compromise in this matter: either the aspirant’s attention is consciously absorbed in seeking to live in the higher aspect of his being, which demands a certain continual sacrifice of his ordinary self (using this sacred sound as a temporary support for that), or he lives blindly, his attention being constantly taken by his lower nature and wasted in worthless preoccupations that require no effort whatsoever from him—gravity being always happy to drag him down to the inferior levels of his being. The living flame of a lamp can only continue to burn and shine forth its radiance if there is an incessant sacrifice of the wick and oil in the lamp. T

 

The seeker who has embarked on this difficult spiritual journey must realize as quickly as possible—so as not merely to grope his way about, struggling without right comprehension—that his attention is the cardinal element that goes to animate and nourish either the one or the other aspect of his being, rendering its manifestation possible. While striving to remain inwardly attentive to this mystical sound, if he has been favoured with true spiritual awakening he will be very much helped to see, without any mistake, how at every moment of his life the two aspects of his nature are both calling to him to follow them at the same time.

 

In the past, he simply obeyed the dictates of his ordinary self unquestioningly and, by so doing, he has unknowingly made himself what he is today. But, now, he is faced with the personal responsibility of an imperative choice to have to make constantly: the choice between the side of his nature he is to give himself to and uninterruptedly sustain with his attention so as to permit this ineffable flame to continue to shine in his being, and the aspect of himself he must perpetually sacrifice so that the higher can affirm its presence in him. It is a cosmic law that the two cannot co-exist simultaneously—in the same way that it is not possible to put pure water in a jar already filled with crude earth without emptying and cleaning it beforehand.

 

When an aspirant lives through the ordinary aspect of himself, this inner mystical sound will not be audible to him. The more he sinks to the lower planes of his nature, passively letting his interest and attention become involved with its incessant inner clamours and preoccupations, the more this Nada will recede into the background of his being until it is not heard any further. If he has been privileged enough to hear and recognize this sacred sound, he must then make every possible effort to try to remain in contact with it at all moments. He may one day discover that he can even be aware of its presence during sleep. This primordial sound is there, in him, and in all things at all times. In certain mystical states, one can hear it vibrating mysteriously in the Cosmos and in all the heavenly stars, just as it is also vibrating in the Sun in a most spectacular way!

 

The seeker must later endeavour to hear this inner sound in very noisy places. He must choose the busiest streets, and strive to hear this sacred Nada with the utmost of his might until the day he arrives at doing so. He will thereafter be surprised to find that, no matter how loud the uproar thunders around him, it is perfectly possible for him to hear this mystical sound vibrating in him with such clarity that there is absolutely nothing external that can drown it. When he is able to hear it in such conditions, he must then struggle to hold onto it in the most difficult situations possible without losing it.

 

In the beginning, as he tries to hear it while walking outside, he should take a tree or any object ahead of him as a landmark and continually aim at it (looking at it from the corner of his eyes), using the distance that separates him from it as a temporary support to remain aware of himself. When reaching this landmark, he must immediately aim at another, ahead of him, all the time carefully listening inwardly to this sacred sound. This inner Nada will become his most precious ally and alarm signal, warning him when he begins to falter and forget himself again. In that manner, he will begin to be protected from harmful identification with external conditions and the many pernicious influences of the outside world.

 

When the aspirant succeeds in holding onto this sacred sound in such difficult conditions without losing it, a moment will finally arrive when he will become strangely distant from himself, and he will start viewing everything around him from another perspective altogether. He will feel that his vision seems to have inexplicably receded to the outside top part of the back of his head, from where he silently and impartially begins to witness all that is taking place around him. Everything will then be seen to be in a constant state of flux. From this uninvolved position, he will perceive that there is absolutely nothing permanent in any animate or inanimate object that meets his gaze. The whole panorama of outer existence will appear to unfurl in front of him as a sort of strange and fantastic dream. And behind it all, he will mysteriously see through his mind’s eye, so to speak, the Unity of all things—“That” which is pervading him and everything else at the same time.

 

The seeker should never forget the significance and value of this mystical sound. It must be looked upon as a benign friend and salutary aid, always there behind the turmoil of his never-ending outer problems and worries, ever knocking at his door to awaken him and help him to become again conscious of himself in a manner that is not habitual to him. But people are generally too preoccupied to hear its sublime call or pay attention to it when it becomes manifest in them. External matters and their physical needs, as well as all their inner anxieties and incessant imaginings, take up the whole of their attention. It is as if something in them said: “Later, later, I must first finish what I am doing.”

 

But “later” never comes. There is always something else claiming one’s attention—and another precious opportunity is lost. One must learn to be always ready and available to the higher calling of this ineffable aspect of one’s nature so as to render one’s spiritual growth and unfolding possible before it is too late—earthly existence being so uncertain.

 

If the aspirant is really serious in his spiritual practice and has had the rare privilege to have heard this wondrous mystical sound, has recognized it, and is deeply moved by it, appreciating and venerating its presence in him, the latter will, of itself, commence to appear to him suddenly at most unexpected moments of the day. Like a divine emissary, it will knock at the gate of his soul, calling him to himself. How he greets this inner call at that particular moment is of paramount importance for him. For the manner in which he welcomes it will determine the frequency of the future visits of this heavenly messenger. The aspirant’s inner response to its calling must always be: “Yes, and a thousand times yes to Thee.”

 

Each time it is there, singing in his ears, the seeker’s attitude to it should be that of a profoundly devout servant, ever ready to answer the call of his supreme Lord and King. At such moments, he must be fully aware, with the utmost of his sincerity, that “It is here! It is here again, singing inside my ears, calling me!”

 

This mystical sound is truly like a hook of Grace. It is the hook of Grace of a divine fisherman trying to drag the aspirant out of the dark quagmire in which he is sadly entrapped.

 

The seeker will abruptly become aware of its presence in him at odd moments of the day, permitting him to see more clearly into the unhappy state by which he had been engulfed a moment before, and to what higher aspect of his nature he is called to turn once more.

 

As his inner awareness deepens, the strange song of this mystical sound will grow correspondingly louder and more shrill in his ears. It will sing inside his head with such supernal beauty as to make him intoxicated with its celestial wine. In that way, it will also encourage and sustain him in moments when suffering cannot be avoided in this form of existence. It will, at all times, help draw him away from his habitual little self and assist him in his efforts to climb out of the mud and unhappy state into which he has sunk and to raise him to the ever-higher realms of his Supreme Being.
 

 

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2 hours ago, ragnarok said:

is this from that book you posted?

Hunji, there are real gems in it. Highly recommended. Always keep references from guru maharaj  in the background and you will see loads of similarities in his words.

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This chapter contains some deep knowledge of heading towards Sunn/Shunya.

Yoga of the Void

It is only when an aspirant tries to control or get away from his thoughts that he will realize what tenacious and formidable opponents he has to deal with. If he forcefully and unintelligently struggles to repress his thoughts, their resistance will grow stronger, greatly frustrating him and rendering his spiritual endeavours impossible. The interminable procession of thoughts that continuously move across the sky of his consciousness, obscuring his inner world like clouds hiding the light of the sun, can be an immense torment for an inexperienced aspirant in the beginning.

He will become especially aware of and confronted with this problem when he first decides seriously to practice meditation. His thoughts will then more than ever plague him, and, unless he understands how to deal wisely with these unwanted intruders—like so many impudent flies on a hot and humid summer afternoon—they will not be easily driven away. No matter how hard he may try to get rid of them, they will obstinately keep coming back.

There is a special method of meditation that consists of vigilantly watching one’s thoughts as a means of freeing oneself from them, while at the same time taking the utmost care not to become identified and entangled with them. If the seeker can resolutely keep to this path, meditating with patience, love, and profound sincerity, it will ultimately lead him to the princely gate that opens out into infinite inner space—revealing to him his True Identity, his primordial Divine Nature.

Having taken his meditation posture, the seeker must first remain very quiet for some moments, deeply relaxing the whole of his body, especially his head and facial muscles. When he feels tranquil enough, he should then close his eyes and turn part of his attention to the movement of his lower abdomen without interfering with its normal breathing rhythm. At the same time, he must watch every thought and image that passes across the screen of his consciousness with the utmost vigilance. He must not let even one thought or image slip by without being fully aware of it. He must, at the same time, take the greatest possible care not to allow himself to be carried away by it and lose himself in it. The exceptional inner presence, sharp attention, and strength of will that this calls forth from an aspirant is at first practically impossible to maintain for more than a few moments.

The difficulty of this particular form of meditation is immense in the beginning, because there is no other support for the aspirant in his efforts to free himself from his customary state of being other than the thoughts themselves, which keep coming and going across the sky of his consciousness. However, if he can muster enough inner force to watch the passage of these thoughts and images without becoming identified with and involved in them, he will start to find that each thought that arises in him has a definite beginning, climax, and an end; and hardly has one thought vanished than another has suddenly arisen to take its place. If the seeker can remain truly inwardly distant and unentangled with his thoughts, then they will of their own quiet down considerably, becoming less and less frequent.

It is at that crucial stage that the aspirant will need to call up in himself the utmost strength of will and watch untiringly, without sliding back again. If he can gather the necessary inner force to continue to maintain this state of intense attentiveness still further, without faltering, then he will suddenly make the surprising discovery that between each individual thought that appears, rises to its zenith, and disappears, there is a gap just before the arising of the next thought, which in his habitual ordinary state it would not have been possible for him to perceive.

If the seeker can now, in as tranquil and simple a manner as possible, plunge deeper into himself while continuing to watch his thoughts, they will quiet to such a great extent that the gap between each succeeding thought will become much wider and more evident. And if, at this point, the aspirant can now fix his attention on this gap, or void (always there between every individual thought, without the seeker’s having realized it before), and can manage to increase its duration, then the realization of what this void really is will start to mysteriously dawn upon him. He will, at the same time, begin to feel in him a most extraordinary inner silence and sublime peace beyond anything that anyone can ordinarily know. It will appear to him as a divine cosmic balm, sweetly filling his whole being with an indescribable sense of sacred serenity. He will now fully realize that what at first seemed to him to be a mere emptiness is in fact filled with an infinite expanse of a highly subtle and impersonal consciousness, a mysterious invisible “Spectator” silently witnessing.

This unusual state of consciousness can in some way be compared to a translucent sky without a here or a there, an up or a down, a front or a back—a clear, translucent, and immeasurable sky where there are no clouds, birds, or any other object passing across it. From the day he took his first breath to this momentous instant, the miracle of his higher nature has ever been waiting for him to remove the veil of his ordinary self and behold its radiance. Without having known it, he owes to its benign Grace his existence, his intelligence, and the continual animation and sustenance of his life.

The seeker will hear this Nada very clearly inside his ears and head throughout every one of his meditations if his concentration is what it should be—sincere, true, serene, and firm, without forcing. In fact, the deeper the concentration, the louder and more shrill this mysterious sound will get, as an encouragement to the aspirant and an indication that he is moving in the right direction.

It is necessary here to put the seeker on his guard that at no time and under no circumstances must he meditate with a mind fixed avidly on seeking results, whether humble or spectacular. All meditations and other spiritual practices should be done solely for the love of doing them and for the pleasure of the struggle itself, letting Divine Grace do what it knows is best for each person according to his problems, needs, and merits.

The aspirant should thoroughly acquaint himself with this form of meditation, which, in addition to its importance as a means of understanding the immutable state beyond the moving mind more clearly, will be extremely useful to him in the tragic moments of his life that are unavoidable in this uncertain existence. It will be another weapon at his disposal when, on distressing days of harassment or unexpected shocks, he may encounter too great a resistance in himself to be able to quiet his thoughts and feelings sufficiently to permit him to meditate. For one should always bear in mind that, even after a certain time of practicing Nada Yoga, there is always a danger that, while actually listening to this celestial inner sound (to which one can become too habituated), one may still be (or become again) partially identified with and lost in one’s customary state of daydreaming without realizing it. In such instances, the above method of meditation could be very helpful to him indeed. If done rightly, it will in any case strengthen his will considerably and give him much more control and choice over his thoughts, even in active life, when he is in the company of other people.

Once the seeker has discovered the reality of his True Nature, his meditation will become much simpler and more natural. To the degree to which he is able to abandon himself, he will, from then onward, be carried by divine Grace.

Until the aspirant comes to know and understand the problem of his mind and thoughts sufficiently, they can be a real source of harassment for him, especially at the beginning of his struggles. That is why it is important for him, right from the start of his practice, to try to see how his mind works, study its reactions and thought associations, and learn to know how much reality and credence to attach to them. His task in this delicate area will be greatly eased by the above method of meditation.

Each time the aspirant turns his attention inward to look at his thoughts and try to seize them, he will find only phantoms and nothing tangible for him to get hold of. His thoughts will have vanished instantly into the void, leaving in their place only a mysterious vacuum whose profound meaning and great value the seeker may at first either miss altogether or not understand. The magical fascination and hypnotic power of thoughts are such that in their habitual state of being people are not aware how they are being duped and enticed into their invisible web. They become ever-so-rapidly identified with them at every turn, blindly lending themselves to their surreptitious suggestions and hidden biddings—devoid, a large part of the time, of value for the fulfillment of their higher destiny.

In the same way that the human being becomes identified with and totally believes in the dreams that he experiences when asleep, he unconsciously falls prey also to the fascination of the phenomenal world around him, as well as to his own illusory passing thoughts, unquestioningly trusting and taking them for granted as being the only true reality there is. But since each time he looks at and tries to seize these thoughts, they suddenly mysteriously disappear into nothing, leaving merely a bare emptiness in their place (thus revealing their unreal nature), an alert and perceptive seeker will realize he has found a subtle, highly effective, and astonishingly simple weapon with which, through patient and repeated practice, he may eventually free himself from the tangles and tyranny of his ordinary thinking and rise to higher spheres of the mind.

In its habitual state, the mind is like a restless monkey that leaps aimlessly from one branch of a tree to another almost continuously. Without being aware of it, the human being keeps hopping inwardly from one thought to the other as they arise mechanically in him, holding on to each one in turn and beguiled most of the time into believing what they suggest to him. He is often unable even to see their contradictions and the deep trouble they get him into as he blindly obeys their promptings. Thus he becomes ever more karmically*2 entangled.

Most of a person’s thoughts are mechanical repetitions, useless, shadowy, and often ridiculously contradictory to the point of being influenced by the incessant changes of the weather itself! By indiscriminately lending his attention to and complying with almost any thought that happens to cross his mind at a given moment, he can be compared to a prostitute who unquestioningly gives herself to anyone that happens to pass by, without in the least reflecting on what is happening to her and the effect that it is having on her being.

If an aspirant’s thoughts are not lofty, creative, and spiritually beneficial, and if, when recurring, they are allowed to settle in his mind, then, in time, they will grow into unquestioned habitual ways of thinking, affecting and molding his being into what he will become. And, furthermore, by then blindly obeying the impulses born of these thoughts, he will ineluctably sink to lower planes of consciousness, developing deep-rooted tendencies that will be spiritually unprofitable and very difficult to free himself from later.

If the seeker can firmly but quietly watch the rise and decline of each one of his thoughts without holding on to them or letting himself become enmeshed in them, he will then be more free in himself to perceive their nothingness. And what is of paramount importance is that the great void, or the screen of vast Consciousness that is behind these thoughts, will begin to appear to his inner vision. It will be like the sudden coming into view of a clear blue sky when smoke and clouds have been blown aside, revealing what was already there beyond them. Then the aspirant will discover with awe and wonderment that, just as the sky remains totally undiminished and unsullied by the passage of the smoke or clouds across it, so, and in spite of all the external mud covering him from his life’s journey on Earth, this superior state of consciousness in him has always retained its purity and sublime beauty. And it is precisely in that extraordinary fact that the hope for his emancipation lies. For this higher state in him is both a Grace and the means of the ultimate contentment that he has been so forlornly longing for and searching for so vainly throughout his terrestrial existence without having known it.

As the seeker progresses, and as he can muster the necessary strength to watch his thoughts for longer and longer periods without losing himself in and becoming identified with them, the gap and vacuum between and behind each one of these thoughts will grow wider and deeper, until a moment comes when he will finally merge into and become this vast mysterious space and void, bringing him the profound peace and sublime happiness that was the state from which he originated and into which he is meant consciously to reenter when he dies—willingly foregoing all the things and experiences that he has known during his brief passage in this world. For these things and experiences were in any case meant only as a temporary means to an end, not to become attached to but there merely to serve a higher purpose and to be discarded when that purpose has been fulfilled.

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18 hours ago, Sat1176 said:

He should listen carefully to both sounds for a while until it becomes absolutely clear to him which of these two sounds is the more subtle and high pitched. It is to this one he must then gently let his attention turn and concentrate on. He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds any more—even though it will keep intruding and drawing him back to it.

Some what confused. It will be great if someone make it more clear for me.

First advised to concentrate on clear subtle and high pitch sound.

Next it say 

He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds

I am going through this stuff slowly. Sound to be very good stuff.

 

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On March 22, 2019 at 11:31 AM, gsm52 said:

Some what confused. It will be great if someone make it more clear for me.

First advised to concentrate on clear subtle and high pitch sound.

Next it say 

He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds

I am going through this stuff slowly. Sound to be very good stuff.

 

Are you hearing multiple sounds?

from what I heard if you listen to the wrong one the Shabads will begin to fade.

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On 3/22/2019 at 4:31 AM, gsm52 said:

He should listen carefully to both sounds for a while until it becomes absolutely clear to him which of these two sounds is the more subtle and high pitched. It is to this one he must then gently let his attention turn and concentrate on. He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds any more—even though it will keep intruding and drawing him back to it.

 

On 3/22/2019 at 4:31 AM, gsm52 said:

Some what confused. It will be great if someone make it more clear for me.

First advised to concentrate on clear subtle and high pitch sound.

Next it say 

He must not be tempted to follow the more obvious of these two sounds

I am going through this stuff slowly. Sound to be very good stuff.

 

Sure. I know it can be confusing because it depends on what stage you are at and exactly what you're hearing. There's nothing wrong with the text from the book but it can easily be misunderstood.  The idea is to listen to initial sound to get going, and then locate the other very subtle sounds in background..  

If you still having confusion, then I can advise via pm according to what i tried and practiced at particular stage.

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Abhiyaasan da Q&A. All from sangat that are having experiences hearing anhad shabads. 

Waheguru

 

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In the first part of this video Bhai Sahib explains the importance of listening to the sehaj dhun. (The high pitched frequency sound) and where it will lead.

Gurmantar -> Sehaj Dhun -> Anhad Sounds -> Naad ->Parkash (aka Satguru /Sach and Agam Shabads)

Nishanis along the path of listening to Sehaj dhun:

  • Will begin to disconnect from body
  • Sweet Mouth / Amrit Ras
  • Jhill Mill (Flashes of lightening)
  • 5 Shabads / More Anhad Sounds
  • Parkash
  • Once in Parkash and can head Shabad then your off.....

 

 

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Guest Abyiasee

Can you please explain more of what sehaj dhun sounds like?

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17 hours ago, Guest Abyiasee said:

n you please explain more of what sehaj dhun sounds like?

 

 

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Guest Sukhpreet
On 1/29/2014 at 11:08 PM, Sat1176 said:

Singh,

 

As one does more and more naam simran the mind becomes still and he hears these sounds naturally or sometimes spontaneously. Don't stop your bhagti whatever you are doing and start looking for sounds. This post is designed more for those who might already be hearing such sounds. I found quite a lot of information on what these sounds are but not what you do with them. This was the first text I read where someone explained possibly a next step on the journey. How to move from one sound to the next. Where you can hear the sounds and where to focus. Was interesting the guy said focus on the swirl of the head because I always thought it was the top.

 

I personally am doing so much research on these sounds because I'm hearing this stuff quite alot at night and I haven't got the foggiest idea what it means or what to do when it happens apart from listen. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night with a massive vibration in my ear that gives me such a shock as if someone has put a speaker to my ear. It was nice to just read that these sounds can be perceived to be near and far. Now noted that they can even cause vibrations in you.. Its all a learning game for us.

 

Lucky,

 

I've posted the main juice from the book but I recommend you buy it and have a quick read yourself. I don't want to type up everything it said. There is quite a bit of padding but there are useful bits of information too.

 

On 1/29/2014 at 11:08 PM, Sat1176 said:

Singh,

 

As one does more and more naam simran the mind becomes still and he hears these sounds naturally or sometimes spontaneously. Don't stop your bhagti whatever you are doing and start looking for sounds. This post is designed more for those who might already be hearing such sounds. I found quite a lot of information on what these sounds are but not what you do with them. This was the first text I read where someone explained possibly a next step on the journey. How to move from one sound to the next. Where you can hear the sounds and where to focus. Was interesting the guy said focus on the swirl of the head because I always thought it was the top.

 

I personally am doing so much research on these sounds because I'm hearing this stuff quite alot at night and I haven't got the foggiest idea what it means or what to do when it happens apart from listen. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night with a massive vibration in my ear that gives me such a shock as if someone has put a speaker to my ear. It was nice to just read that these sounds can be perceived to be near and far. Now noted that they can even cause vibrations in you.. Its all a learning game for us.

 

Lucky,

 

I've posted the main juice from the book but I recommend you buy it and have a quick read yourself. I don't want to type up everything it said. There is quite a bit of padding but there are useful bits of information too.

WJKK WJKF 

@Sat1176 @Lucky veerji

its been a long long time for you people hearing these sounds now. U must have grown upon them. Any new suggestions or instructions  u would like to tell us newcomers here.. Please. 

 

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Guest Sukhpreet

Even I hear the ringing sound, like in these above listed videos. But then what. Shall I ignore them or listen to them more keenly or what. Are they anhad by any chance. 

I hear somewhere around 18-19hz but the other video of ringing years is more close to what I hear .. Like those insects' sounds 

Please can anyone here guide me

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18 hours ago, Guest Sukhpreet said:

 

WJKK WJKF 

@Sat1176 @Lucky veerji

its been a long long time for you people hearing these sounds now. U must have grown upon them. Any new suggestions or instructions  u would like to tell us newcomers here.. Please. 

 

Have you read through the all posts in this thread and the Mediation section already? Newcomers should start there. Expecting us to summarise it so you don't have to make the effort is expecting bit much.  We are already sharing with this forum as much as we can as we learn ourselves slowly on this path.

There is quite a lot info on the subject here already which has taken years to accumulate. Most who read this thread probably don't believe in it anyway yet. It's one thing knowing about it, and it is another actually practising it. What we have accumulated here is intellectual gyan that those who seek may find useful as it is really hard to come by. From what I have read and understood, the real gyan will come when we actually practice and dive in. The Divine bestows this gyan when we surrender ourselves, and this is very hard to do. Most of us can't even stop the chatter of our mind longer than a minute or two and just be present listening. Start with WaheGuru Gurmantar first. Build a solid foundation in this where you can keep your dhyan present and focused on it for decent period of time without useless chatter occurring and your mind drifting off into the waves of other thoughts. You will be astonished to observe how frequently your mind wonders. 

 

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1 minute ago, ragnarok said:

What do you think of Bhai Simranjeet Singhs pronunciation of gurmantar as ' Wah - Guroo'

He pronounces it with a very short e, which most are not accustomed to and have never heard it said this way or sung in this manor. But what you need to appreciate is that the gurmantar is being used as a mantra in two quick parts with a distinct pause between the two parts "Wahe-Guru". One for inhale and the other for exhale. As you progress to doing simran faster and faster from bakhari, to quick saas saas, to even rom rom where you are saying it rapidly in sync with each beat of the pulse, you will begin appreciating the method that he uses as it is kept consistent through each of the stages. It takes a bit of getting used to as most are used to saying it in a elongated fashion of waaheeeguroo. This pronunciation won't work with rapid simran. Try for yourself and see.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Sat1176 said:

He pronounces it with a very short e, which most are not accustomed to and have never heard it said this way or sung in this manor. But what you need to appreciate is that the gurmantar is being used as a mantra in two quick parts with a distinct pause between the two parts "Wahe-Guru". One for inhale and the other for exhale. As you progress to doing simran faster and faster from bakhari, to quick saas saas, to even rom rom where you are saying it rapidly in sync with each beat of the pulse, you will begin appreciating the method that he uses as it is kept consistent through each of the stages. It takes a bit of getting used to as most are used to saying it in a elongated fashion of waaheeeguroo. This pronunciation won't work with rapid simran. Try for yourself and see.

I was just reading the significance of having a slight gap between breathing.

"Taking a slow, deep breath from time to time during the day, with a brief retention of the breath after the inhalation, constitutes an aid to recenter oneself inwardly and find again in oneself that inhabitual state of being."

It also helps balance flow in the two nostrils.

 

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Another technique of self-surrendering whilst listening to the naad.

 

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Guest Sukhpreet
5 hours ago, Sat1176 said:

Have you read through the all posts in this thread and the Mediation section already? Newcomers should start there. Expecting us to summarise it so you don't have to make the effort is expecting bit much.  We are already sharing with this forum as much as we can as we learn ourselves slowly on this path.

There is quite a lot info on the subject here already which has taken years to accumulate. Most who read this thread probably don't believe in it anyway yet. It's one thing knowing about it, and it is another actually practising it. What we have accumulated here is intellectual gyan that those who seek may find useful as it is really hard to come by. From what I have read and understood, the real gyan will come when we actually practice and dive in. The Divine bestows this gyan when we surrender ourselves, and this is very hard to do. Most of us can't even stop the chatter of our mind longer than a minute or two and just be present listening. Start with WaheGuru Gurmantar first. Build a solid foundation in this where you can keep your dhyan present and focused on it for decent period of time without useless chatter occurring and your mind drifting off into the waves of other thoughts. You will be astonished to observe how frequently your mind wonder

 

 

 

 

Hanji,

I have been on this reading journey for a couple of weeks now, in fact I posted another question too which I don't know why but hasn't been published by the moderators ... They haven't approved my membership yet too.. Must br busy

Trying again to post. Actually I didn't land here coincidently ..seems my prayers have been answered. It's been a time since am hearing these insect kinda sounds. Very similar to the one  in 'ringing ears after gun shot ' video u mentioned above. But am not sure what that signifies-if it at all it does. What next then. So that's why I asked if any updates are..  Please guide  

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4 hours ago, ragnarok said:

What do you think of Bhai Simranjeet Singhs pronunciation of gurmantar as ' Wah - Guroo'

 

3 hours ago, Sat1176 said:

He pronounces it with a very short e, which most are not accustomed to and have never heard it said this way or sung in this manor. But what you need to appreciate is that the gurmantar is being used as a mantra in two quick parts with a distinct pause between the two parts "Wahe-Guru". One for inhale and the other for exhale. As you progress to doing simran faster and faster from bakhari, to quick saas saas, to even rom rom where you are saying it rapidly in sync with each beat of the pulse, you will begin appreciating the method that he uses as it is kept consistent through each of the stages. It takes a bit of getting used to as most are used to saying it in a elongated fashion of waaheeeguroo. This pronunciation won't work with rapid simran. Try for yourself and see.

 

 

@Sat1176Veerji is right.  We get used to it.  Still u can hear this one ☝ if Simranjit Singh jis voice is not appealing to u

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10 minutes ago, Guest Sukhpreet said:

Hanji,

I have been on this reading journey for a couple of weeks now, in fact I posted another question too which I don't know why but hasn't been published by the moderators ... They haven't approved my membership yet too.. Must br busy

Trying again to post. Actually I didn't land here coincidently ..seems my prayers have been answered. It's been a time since am hearing these insect kinda sounds. Very similar to the one  in 'ringing ears after gun shot ' video u mentioned above. But am not sure what that signifies-if it at all it does. What next then. So that's why I asked if any updates are..  Please guide  

I don't like to guide anyone as I'm not that far along the path myself. But I will share with you what I was told to do.

You are hearing something referred to as Sehaj Dhun. This is how anhad is heard in the early stages. If you listen to some of the videos by Bhai Simranjeet Singh posted he will say that one should not listen to these sounds until one has obtained some sort of mental stillness, i.e. free of thoughts. If you struggle with thoughts during your simran then you should stick with gurmantar only until comes a time when thoughts don't bother you so much. It is not recommended to start straight with anhad sounds.

If your thoughts are reasonably subdued during simran then keep the gurmantar slowly and gently going in the background and then switch you concentration from dhyan on gurmantar to keeping dhyan on the sehaj dhun. Keeping the gurmantar going on in the background will stop your mind from doing mental acrobatics when it is free to do whatever it wants. If you feel a thought coming on, switch your dhyan back to the sound of the gurmantar until the thought passes and you have mental stillness again.

Hope that helps.

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