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On 31/12/2015 at 6:44 PM, chatanga1 said:

Why concern yourself with USA? Concentrate on your own house. USA don't have 7000 people a day dying from starvation.

 

It comes down to empowerment. Like my main man Ali-G said, "give a man a mix cd and he dance for a night, give him twin turntables, and he'll be mixing for a generation."

Governments have a duty to look after their citizens.

Well this is what Isro has got in Ireturn

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Isro is now Launching Satellite for American firms on commercial basis

Quote

Nasa  is now partner of ISRo

India is getting and will get much more in   return because of Mangalyaan and Chandaryaan

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25 minutes ago, Amandeep Hindustani said:

Btw, the Hindu temples are willing to part with their trillions in gold to help the nation move forward. Are you and your community willing to do the same? 

The track record of Hinduism along with Islam is worst in Social development. , Sikhism perhaps has best among religions , So sikhs don't need to copy anything

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9 hours ago, kdsingh80 said:

The track record of Hinduism along with Islam is worst in Social development. , Sikhism perhaps has best among religions , So sikhs don't need to copy anything

Right now it is the worst but at some point it was very good. Social development amongst the Christian nations was just as bad up until about 150 years ago. Those are just civilizational cycles.

There is no use in comparing islam, hinduism and Christianity to Sikhism. These are massive civilizations that span several millennia. 

Keep in mind I do see Sikhism going the same way as others. Right now your population is only about 25 million wait till it hits 100 million or 200 million. 

 

 

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On 01/01/2016 at 3:08 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

I guess you missed the post " economic benefits of the space program" before you make such a sweeping and lame declaration. 

Did you take into account the data? Do you even understand the data? Or you just chose to ignore it? 

That is exactly the point Mr Pakistani. Oh sorry did I call you Mr Pakistani, maybe it because you value money more than life? Or more than you countrypeople's lives?

 

 

On 01/01/2016 at 3:35 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

Lol! Think for a moment, if this taxpayer took his 5 rupees and gave it a poor person instead of handing it over to some religious institution. Or how about sponsoring a family or child?

 

Exactly what should be done.

 

On 01/01/2016 at 3:36 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

Btw, the Hindu temples are willing to part with their trillions in gold to help the nation move forward. Are you and your community willing to do the same? 

 

You say this here but then say :

On 02/01/2016 at 1:35 AM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

There is no use in comparing islam, hinduism and Christianity to Sikhism. These are massive civilizations that span several millennia. 

Make up your mind.

 

On 01/01/2016 at 4:03 PM, kdsingh80 said:

India is getting and will get much more in   return because of Mangalyaan and Chandaryaan

Not disputed. Of course in the long run india will get a lot from it. But why are you so content with ignoring short-term effects on the populace?

 

 

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Not disputed. Of course in the long run india will get a lot from it. But why are you so content with ignoring short-term effects on the populace?

A govt has to think about long term and short term effects. Why India still has mass poverty , because none of Govt gave much importance to long term goals. poverty elimination need long term planning, you can't just divert all your resources toward short term goals and one day realise that we are totally left behind in world , this will bring more poverty in future.

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19 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

That is exactly the point Mr Pakistani. Oh sorry did I call you Mr Pakistani, maybe it because you value money more than life? Or more than you countrypeople's lives?

 

 

 

Exactly what should be done.

 

 

You say this here but then say :

Make up your mind.

 

Not disputed. Of course in the long run india will get a lot from it. But why are you so content with ignoring short-term effects on the populace?

 

 

I'm not an idealist but a realist. Money makes the world go around. Do you think the noble langars served in the Gurudwaras are done for free? The maintenance of temples and creating new ones are done for free? Social programs?

Nothing is for free.

Even when you go to Gurudwara or Temple you probably bring with you 5 dollars.

Simple Formula - Money = more opportunities.

I'm surprised by you. Here you are probably sitting in a capitalistic society yet you wish socialism upon your people in Punjab.

 

 

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Like I said earlier. Poverty in India, or anywhere is a result of mistakes committed by the government, people themselves, religious institutions and corporations. The solution to these problems has to be solved by all of them together.

You can start off by telling "the people" to do a few things outlined below:

a) Have less kids - unless of course you want the government to come into your bedroom and wrap your lingam for you.

b) Open up a bank account under the Dhan Yogna Scheme (190 million accounts opened so far) money and benefits will be directly transfered to your accounts. Effectively cutting out the middleman.

c) Do not give that rishwat! Refuse and report!

d) Pay taxes for service used. So, the government can have more funds to spend on infrastructure, education and healthcare.

e) Give up subsidies, if you dont require them.

f) Donate less to the religious institutions - more to yourself.

 

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22 hours ago, kdsingh80 said:

A govt has to think about long term and short term effects. Why India still has mass poverty , because none of Govt gave much importance to long term goals. poverty elimination need long term planning, you can't just divert all your resources toward short term goals and one day realise that we are totally left behind in world , this will bring more poverty in future.

Of course it does. But where does the balance lie? What would be your feelings if 7000 people were dying including members of your family? Would you really want the govt to send something into space so it could make a few million in a few years, or would you want your family and those others to get a meal?

I am not surprised at your apathy as an indian, but your apathy as a Sikh is horrendous.

 

2 hours ago, Amandeep Hindustani said:

I'm surprised by you. Here you are probably sitting in a capitalistic society yet you wish socialism upon your people in Punjab.

I'm surprised at you Mr Pakistani. Mixing up humanism with socialism.

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1 hour ago, chatanga1 said:

Of course it does. But where does the balance lie? What would be your feelings if 7000 people were dying including members of your family? Would you really want the govt to send something into space so it could make a few million in a few years, or would you want your family and those others to get a meal?

I am not surprised at your apathy as an indian, but your apathy as a Sikh is horrendous.

 

 

Do you or me have solution.The 7000 figure consist of mainly children dying of Malnutrtion

Quote

Child malnutrition rates in India are extraordinarily high – among the highest in the world, with nearly one-half of all children under 3 years old being either underweight or stunted. Indeed, child malnutrition rates are higher in India than in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa, even though income levels are significantly higher – and levels of infant and child mortality are lower – in India. This phenomenon, which is true more generally of the entire South Asian region, is often referred to as the ‘Asian enigma’.

A national shame
Malnutrition sets in very early in the life of an Indian child. Indeed, nearly a quarter of all children are born with a major nutritional disadvantage – low birth-weight, meaning that they weigh less than 2.5kg at birth. Important reasons for low birth-weight are the high proportion of mothers who themselves are underweight (one-third of all pregnant women have a body mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5) and who suffer from anemia or iron deficiency (nearly 60% of pregnant women suffer from anemia).

Why is combating hunger and malnutrition so important? Freedom from hunger and malnutrition is a basic human right, and until India can provide these freedoms, its claims to successful human development are questionable. As Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said recently, the country’s unacceptably-high level of child malnutrition is a ‘national shame’. 

The economic costs of hunger and malnutrition
In addition to the human cost, there is a huge economic cost to hunger and malnutrition – in terms of loss of cognitive ability, schooling, and labour productivity. Estimates, albeit rough ones, suggest that malnutrition may be costing the Indian economy the equivalent of 4%-5% of its GDP. 

Perhaps surprisingly, the problem of under-nutrition in India now coexists with the problem of over-nutrition and associated non-communicable diseases for a different segment of the population. Recent medical evidence suggests that the two might be related – low birth-weight children and children who are malnourished are more likely to develop chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, as adults. India has the largest number of adults with type 2 diabetes in the world and this number is growing rapidly – having doubled over the past 10 years. Indeed, India has a higher rate of diabetes than many Western countries with much higher levels of economic prosperity.

What is surprising is that the prevalence of child malnutrition in India has remained stubbornly high even after nearly a half-century of respectable agricultural productivity growth and two decades of post-reform economic growth and prosperity in the country. This is puzzling, since rising prosperity appears to have improved other social indicators in India, such as fertility, mortality, schooling and literacy.

Adding more support to the view that child malnutrition is weakly correlated with income is the finding that among children of mothers with 10 or more years of schooling as well as among children of mothers from the top income quintile, around one-quarter are underweight. Even in a relatively prosperous and dynamic state like Gujarat, child malnutrition rates have been stagnant over the past decade.

It is not just the trends and patterns in child malnutrition that are mystifying; there is a similar puzzle about nutrient intake. The UN’s Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) estimates the number of ‘hungry’ people in India at 230 million,[1] which is remarkable given robust agricultural productivity growth during the last three decades. For instance, yields of food grains have doubled since the early 1970s and of ‘coarse’ cereals (such as maize, sorghum and pearl millet), which are traditionally the main foods of the poor in India, have more than doubled. Yet astonishingly, over the same period, mean calorie intake in the country has actually fallen – by about 10% in the rural areas and 4% in the urban areas.[2] 

Income and food intake
What does this all mean? Simply that we do not yet have a good understanding of how the poor in India make their food consumption and nutritional choices. The old adage of people living to eat rather than eating to live is relevant here. Food is a fuel for the human body, and therefore its demand is partly based on caloric needs and requirements of the human body. But it does not typically take very much to satisfy these basic caloric demands of the body, even in a poor country. A very large portion of the demand for food is thus based on the non-nutritive attributes of food, such as taste, aroma, variety, and status. This means that increases in household income do not always translate into improvements in calorie consumption. 

Researchers had noted this tendency as far back as 25 years ago; even in one of the poorest regions of rural India, such as the semi-arid villages of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, the income gradient of calorie intake was observed to be essentially flat, despite controlling for many other observed and unobserved factors (Behrman and Deolalikar 1987). This did not mean that household food consumption did not increase with income; indeed, expenditure on food was highly responsive to income changes. What was happening was that as incomes increased, households – even very poor households that were presumably (according to most external observers’ standards) ‘hungry’ and under-nourished – changed the composition of their food intake away from staples with a relatively low-price per calorie , such as sorghum and millet, to foods with a high price per calorie, such as rice, vegetables, and sugar. This shift in consumption accounted for the larger expenditures on food, but unchanged calorie intake, with increasing income.

This same tendency has been observed more recently by other researchers, who have also found that many of the poor in India do not put as much of their money into obtaining more calories (or at least as many calories as the UN FAO might think are appropriate, see Banerjee and Duflo 2011). Indeed, quite surprisingly, as child malnutrition rates have stagnated and calorie consumption has actually fallen, mobile phone use – even among the Indian rural poor – has increased dramatically. This raises many questions, including the obvious one – why do the poor, when given an opportunity, choose to spend their additional income on luxury durables, such as mobile phones, than on the nutrition of their children? Is it because they are uninformed about the long-term economic benefits of child nutrition? Or is it because ‘expert’ assessments about the prevalence and economic cost of under-nutrition in India are essentially incorrect?

A feast of questions but a famine of answers
What does this mean for policy? There is no shortage of programmes in India aimed at improving access to food and alleviating malnutrition. In addition to the Public Distribution System, which makes some staple foods such as food grains and sugar available at controlled prices through ‘fair-price shops’, there are a number of food-for-work programmes and employment guarantee schemes, the largest of which is the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Generation Scheme (MNREGA). Among the direct nutrition supplementation programmes are the Midday Meal Scheme, which is now almost universal in all the states, and the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), which is the largest supplementation programme of its kind in the world (and probably the largest ever in human history). The spending on all of these programmes is huge; the central allocation for the ICDS programme alone in 2012-13 is nearly $3 billion. Many of these nutritional interventions have been evaluated (although none of the evaluations has been very rigorous); unsurprisingly, the conclusion of most studies is that, taken together, these programmes have not made much of a dent in either protein-energy under-nutrition or child malnutrition rates in the country.

A lot has been written on hunger and malnutrition in India and around the world. There are many studies on the ICDS and on the design and implementation problems that plague the programme. But the fact remains that designing an effective programme is difficult unless policymakers have a better understanding of the true prevalence of ‘hunger’ and of the causes of child malnutrition. This suggests that there is need for more research on the extent and causes of malnutrition in the country, perhaps carried out by researchers beyond just the nutrition and public health community. For instance, there is considerable scope for anthropologists and sociologists to investigate the cultural and social contexts within which the poor make their families’ food consumption and nutrition decisions. Possible questions include: Why is it that only a quarter of new mothers in India initiate breast-feeding of their infants within an hour after birth even though it is widely known that colostrum is one of the most nutrition-rich foods for infants? And why do fewer than half of Indian mothers breast-feed exclusively in the first six months, even though that is the prescribed World Health Organisation (WHO) and Government of India (GOI) recommendation? (Delayed and non-exclusive breast-feeding sets the new-born infant on the path of malnutrition very early in life.) Among other questions to address are: Is the Indian diet, which is largely vegetarian, responsible for the high rates of child malnutrition? Is the mix of foods fed to Indian infants (e.g., not very energy-dense) responsible for early onset of child malnutrition? 

Reason for hope
There is, however, reason for hope. India has been successful in addressing (although obviously not completely solving) many social problems that seemed insurmountable only recently. 

The clearest case in point is access to schooling. There has been an impressive expansion of schooling, especially among girls and disadvantaged social groups, during the last two decades. After being stagnant for many decades since independence, school enrolment rates expanded rapidly during the 1990s and 2000s, especially at the primary and lower secondary school level, and there is currently near-universal access to primary schooling. 

There is thus no reason why India should not be able to successfully combat hunger and malnutrition. But this will be possible only if policymakers move beyond ad hoc approaches, and instead devise an informed strategy based on a good understanding of why hunger and child nutrition are so high in India relative to other countries and why they have so unresponsive to improvements in income and prosperity.
- See more at: http://www.ideasforindia.in/article.aspx?article_id=8#sthash.REy6Jc03.dpuf

If in a country like India people are following religion like islam or some backward culture which dictate them to have many kids even if you don't have money then you cannot put blame only on Govt.changing culture , making people abandon backward religious practices while implementing govt schemes is gradual process, there are no quick fixes to problem

 

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20 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

Of course it does. But where does the balance lie? What would be your feelings if 7000 people were dying including members of your family? Would you really want the govt to send something into space so it could make a few million in a few years, or would you want your family and those others to get a meal?

I am not surprised at your apathy as an indian, but your apathy as a Sikh is horrendous.

 

I'm surprised at you Mr Pakistani. Mixing up humanism with socialism.

Humanism? You mean sitting in you air conditioned room somewhere in the west, logging onto your iphone or computer and making comments that are detached from reality?

I wonder if you are the type of person who would have prevented inventions and technology in past in your quest for begumpura. The same technologies directly or indirectly employ hundreds of millions, if not billions of people across the globe.

How many trillions did your western world steal from places like India and China? Are you culpable in the grinding poverty of developing nations?

 

 

 

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A person can't eat what he wants because our granth, religious institution, guru or avatar said so!

Really?

A malnurished child should not be allowed to eat egg, pork, beef, chicken for nutrition? That is the message that I get from India's religious institutions...

But........the silver lining is that you can ask your God, to whom you donate billions, if not trillions yearly, to step in.......can you do this for us?

You see a true Humanist pretty much is ambivilent towards the concept of God and religion....and rather believes human beings are the doer.

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On 6/1/2016 at 8:31 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

A person can't eat what he wants because our granth, religious institution, guru or avatar said so!

Really?

A malnurished child should not be allowed to eat egg, pork, beef, chicken for nutrition? That is the message that I get from India's religious institutions...

But........the silver lining is that you can ask your God, to whom you donate billions, if not trillions yearly, to step in.......can you do this for us?

You see a true Humanist pretty much is ambivilent towards the concept of God and religion....and rather believes human beings are the doer.

India has millions of useless cows , bulls , oxen which can be legally exported to Bangladesh and other neighbouring countries and in return Millions of tons foodgrain can be purchased  every year but religious orthodox will not allow this.

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10 minutes ago, kdsingh80 said:

India has millions of useless cows , bulls , oxen which can be legally exported to Bangladesh and other neighbouring countries and in return Millions of tons foodgrain can be purchased  every year but religious orthodox will not allow this.

Exactly. Its been drilled into Indian people for generations as to what to eat or not to eat. I'm glad though that meat, grain, milk etc.. production and consumption is up significantly. Hmmmmm.....chicken! Yum Yum..

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Mr Pakistani. It may have escaped your attention but the Chennai Sikhs were distributing langar, arranging and commandeering boats to take langar to people who were trapped in their houses and help them to safety as well. This was organised by the local Gurdwara there. So while your overhyped space bucket has done nothing for the people of your country in tangible terms, the Sikh community whilst washing it's floors in gallons of milk, has still managed to prevent the 300 deaths from escalating.

 

Enjoy that chicken.

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5 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

Mr Pakistani. It may have escaped your attention but the Chennai Sikhs were distributing langar, arranging and commandeering boats to take langar to people who were trapped in their houses and help them to safety as well. This was organised by the local Gurdwara there. So while your overhyped space bucket has done nothing for the people of your country in tangible terms, the Sikh community whilst washing it's floors in gallons of milk, has still managed to prevent the 300 deaths from escalating.

 

Enjoy that chicken.

Prevented 300 deaths? Thats it?

The Army based on satellite and other information prevented thousands.

Yur talking to the wrong person. I have very little compassion or sympathy, unfortunately. I feel nothing. Hindus or otherwise.

Ultimately, its Gods will, no?

Is that what your taught to believe when you fork over cash?

Enjoy that Langar bro!

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On 15/01/2016 at 7:54 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

Prevented 300 deaths? Thats it?

No. Prevented the death rate of 300 from escalating.

 

On 15/01/2016 at 7:54 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

The Army based on satellite and other information prevented thousands.

 

Thousands? Is that it?

Millions have died from starvation in that time, You wanna count thousands or millions?

 

On 15/01/2016 at 7:54 PM, Amandeep Hindustani said:

Enjoy that Langar bro!

 

I do. So do your Hindustani brothers. Whilst you are stargazing.

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On January-24-16 at 10:02 AM, chatanga1 said:

No. Prevented the death rate of 300 from escalating.

 

 

Thousands? Is that it?

Millions have died from starvation in that time, You wanna count thousands or millions?

 

 

I do. So do your Hindustani brothers. Whilst you are stargazing.

You can make this better bro! Ask the creator to make food, water, and shelter available to everyone. Wait for a while, and lets see what happens!

I "stargaze" while you search for invisible friend in the sky!

Well, at least the star gives off some light.

BTW, I was just talking to a family friend who is a local leader in the Gurudwara over here in Toronto. He says people call into ask what type of sabji is being cooked today, and how many different kinds.

 

 

 

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http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/isro-set-for-record-launch-plans-20-satellites-in-orbit-in-26-minutes-1421878

SRIHARIKOTA, ANDHRA PRADESH:  Indian space agency ISRO today successfully placed in orbit a record 20 satellites carried by its flagship rocket in a 26-minute flight from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh.

Till now, ISRO has launched 74 satellites for foreign vendors from about 20 countries, earning about $ 100 million in the bargain.

How people who were mocking India for Mangalyaan didn't realise that ISRO is now doing brisk business

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15 hours ago, kdsingh80 said:

How people who were mocking India for Mangalyaan didn't realise that ISRO is now doing brisk business

 

Who was mocking? I was questioning the priority of the indian govt since the time of that launch and the last post made concerning this topic (Jan 27) by the governments own figures, 1.2 million indians have died through starvation.

How much of this £100 million will those afflicted families see Mr KD Singh Ji?

Will 7000 people a day now be saved from starvation because the govt has £100 million extra ?

 

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7 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

 

Who was mocking? I was questioning the priority of the indian govt since the time of that launch and the last post made concerning this topic (Jan 27) by the governments own figures, 1.2 million indians have died through starvation.

How much of this £100 million will those afflicted families see Mr KD Singh Ji?

Will 7000 people a day now be saved from starvation because the govt has £100 million extra ?

 

I think we had already discussed that , whatever Government invested ,ISRO is now giving back 2-3 times to Govt.Whether the money goes to poor or not is different issue

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6 hours ago, kdsingh80 said:

I think we had already discussed that , whatever Government invested ,ISRO is now giving back 2-3 times to Govt.Whether the money goes to poor or not is different issue

So what use will this be to those 7000 people who died today then?

Dying with the knowledge that their government has made £100 million.

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3 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

So what use will this be to those 7000 people who died today then?

Dying with the knowledge that their government has made £100 million.

What about the people? They can keep reproducing , despite knowing they don't have food they keep on reproducing expecting Govt to feed them. 

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3 hours ago, kdsingh80 said:

What about the people? They can keep reproducing , despite knowing they don't have food they keep on reproducing expecting Govt to feed them. 

EXPECTING the government to feed them? Do you realise how ridiculous that sounds?

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45 minutes ago, chatanga1 said:

EXPECTING the government to feed them? Do you realise how ridiculous that sounds?

So what solution you have, It is not India the whole developing world is suffering from chronic unemployment , poverty etc There are no quick fix solution to this problem . and with more advancement of technology , use of robots , driverless cars this problem will keep on increasing.

 

India started exactly what you are saying , we are poor we are starving nation , we will not allow private industry , we will not spend on technology , result it pushed India into much more backwardness , while Indian population exploded and poverty was not eliminated

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