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The relationship between the cow and Sikhism has long since intrigued  me. A recent post leads me to ask " what is the relationship between the sacredness of the cow and Sikhism?

Did any of the Guru's or do any of the Sikh scripture promote the idea of sacredness to the cow? If so, can someone give me some proof? 

I know there were battles fought over protecting the cow - not sure how many, anyone have any idea? where there any during the time of the Gurus.

What about other animals that are revered in Hinduism, I know the 24 incarnations mentions certain animals that are revered in the Hindu faith, Is it the same in Sikki?

Thanks

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Uggardanti bani of Guru Gobindsingh ji if i am not wrong twice talks about protection of cows.

Rachh gauann karijay...is what is mentioned if i correctly mentioned.

Also ...Gau ghaat siyo jag ko bachau..if i can remember that correctly.

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Thanks Jaikaara !

If you don't mind do you have quotes, I can't read Gurumukhi so is it possible to have the English translation also ?

Uggardanti bani of Guru Gobindsingh, is this in the Dassam granth ?

Edited by truthseeker546

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gaU Gwq kw doK jg isauN imtwaUN ]
ieh hukm idE ik qurkW nUM mwr imtWvW [
gaU mwrn dw duK swry sMswr ivcoN imtw dyvW [
Command me to kill and destroy the Turks (Muslims).
Eliminate the killing of the cow from the entire universe.
rtoN ins idnw jwp qumrw BvwnI ]
qumn crn moN pRIiq hmrI lgwnI ]
qyry nwm dw jwp mYN rwq idn krW AY BvwnI (mW) [
qyry crnw'c myrI pRIq lgI rvyH [
I repeat your name day and night O Bhawani.
Your (sacred) feet will remain my focus of devoted love.
krhu hir BvwnI jgq kI sMBwry ]
hmn duSt doKI sBn hoihM Cwry ]
hy pRBU BvwnI qUM jgq dI sMBwlxw kryN [
swfy duSt doKI jo hn auh swry (suAwh) Kqm ho jwx [
O Godly Bhawani (you should) sustain the universe.
All our evil enemies ought to perish.
sdw srbdw crx qumry iDAwaUN ]
qumn imhr isauN dust sgly KpwaUN ]
mYN sdw hI qyry crnw dw iDAwn Drdw rhW [
qyrI imhr nwl hI swry duStW dw nws krW [
I should always contemplate on your feet.
With your blessing I shall destroy all the wicked.
XhI Aws pUrn krhu qum hmwrI ]
imtY kst gaUAn CutY Kyd BwrI ]
ieho myrI ie`Cw qusIN pUrI kro [
gaU, kSt Aqy BwrI duK qoN mukiq ho jwvy [
Grant me this boon.
Relieve the cow of agony and all ailments.
 
XhI bynqI Kws hmrI suxIjY ]
Asur mwr kr r`C gaUAn krIjY ]
ieho myrI Kws Arz suxo [
rwkiSSW (AsurW) nUM mwrky gaU (grIb) dI rkSW kro [
Kindly adhere to my specific request.
Annihilate the evil demons and safeguard the cow (destitute).

 

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Just wondering, what is the source of Uggardanti? Not existent in Dasam Granth from cursory googling. Not that it invalidates the tukhs you cited, but just kind of curious on a tangent

I think there are a couple aspects to look at here.

First off, without doubt, Sikhs traditionally did not consume beef. Goat and pork were the main delicacies, but beef was a no-no. Ranjit Singh banned beef slaughter throughout the empire, and many British sources noted how the Sikh Sardars detested beef as much as smoking. I also thought I read somewhere that Ratan Singh Bhangoo included an episode in Lahore where Singh's see a butcher taking a cow out to slaughter and put him to sword, although I can't find that now via control+f of my copy of the work (which is this, by the way. I hope it's accurate?-http://sikhinstitute.org/gpp_v1.pdf)

In terms of the contemporary, Nihangs specifically have an injunction against beef. I know that Namdharis, a pacifist Sikh "sect" of sorts, go crazy about cows. They broke their pacifism to kill beef butchers in Malerkotla. 

The more difficult question to ascertain is what does Sikh philosophy teach about beef. From my reading of Guru Granth Sahib and vaaran, very little to actually suggest this. Guru Nanak criticized the Brahmin practice of applying cow dung. Bhai Gurdas also wrote this: 

"

dhaekh paraaeeaaa(n) cha(n)geeaaa(n) maavaa(n) bhainaa dhheeaaa(n) jaanai||
The Sikh ought to treat beautiful women of others as his mothers, sisters and daughters.
 
 
ous sooar ous gaae hai par dhhan hi(n)dhoo musalamaanai||
Others’ wealth for his is as beef for Hindu and pork for a Muslim.

 

corroborated by folks such as Bhangoo, which suggests the religious taboo for Sikhs equivalent to that for Hindus+beef is more like adultery/thievery than dietary restrictions.

 

Why were ancient Sikhs so apprehensive of cow-meat then? Very obvious reason, and that's that the cow is just a culturally respected animal. I personally eat beef (non-halal of course) but none of my family in India does-my father tells me that on his first time eating a burger, he felt very odd about it considering how he thought of cows in his childhood. And it wasn't that there was a heightened sacredness or anything of the sort for him. It was just...cows were considered man's best friend just like dogs or horses in the West, so why kill them for taste? They have a ton of value anyway outside of beef, such as milk and labor. 

 

I openly admit that, yes, I eat beef. Why? I think times have changed, and while I consider myself a Punjabi Sikh and align with that heritage, I don't personally care about dead cows as much as my ancestors did. I haven't found a compelling reason within Sikh philosophy or even codes of conduct to do so (although I do expect if I take Amrit I'll prob stop eating beef anyway as I'll focus on hunting for meat instead of store-bought). Finally, I think some of the stuff surrounding the sacredness of the cow just is sort of ajeeb to me (again, my personal views)-the fixation on cow urine and dung, valuing a farm animal's life more than a human's (Banda Bairagi's discussion with Guru Gobind Singh comes to mind), the fact that buffaloes aren't valued at all and are even sometimes ritually slaughtered, and so on. I do admit, it is always funny how Westerners who will sign petitions online to "STOP the EVIL practice of eating dogs in Korea," yet mock and lament contemporary Hindus+Desis for being "cow-worshippers."

Sorry if there was a lot of my personal thoughts and not enough source material for you. 

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Sikhs, in the past, have sacrificed their lives for cow protection. Therefore, a Sikh must never ever consume beef. Sikhs don't worship cows, but they are estimable animals.

Gurbani states:

ਬ੍ਰਹਮਣ ਕੈਲੀ ਘਾਤੁ ਕੰਞਕਾ ਅਣਚਾਰੀ ਕਾ ਧਾਨੁ ॥

He who kills a spiritual person, a cow and daughters and accepts the food of an evil man,

ਫਿਟਕ ਫਿਟਕਾ ਕੋੜੁ ਬਦੀਆ ਸਦਾ ਸਦਾ ਅਭਿਮਾਨੁ ॥

is cursed with leprosy of reproaches, misdeed and an abiding egotism.

Quote

  Narsingha said:
Well, the cow is sacred...Gurblias Shemi (chapter 16) speaks of Guru Hargobind Sahib being the protector of the brahmin (ie, holy men) and the cow.

As you have pointed yout jtsingh, Oogardanti Baani speaks of cow killing as a sin. Guruji speaks :

"Give me this command that I may grab Turks and destroy them. The great evil of cow-killing may I stop in this world. The throne of the Moghals may I destroy"

(Oogardanti Baani)

"Fulfil this desire of mine. May suffering of cows stop. May the victory of the true Guru resound through out the world.

(Oogardanti Baani)

A text by Monier Williams, 'Religious Thought and Life in India' (1883) also speaks of killing of cows as "the most henious of crimes".

Giani Gian Singh speaks of the actions of Akali Nihang Baba Jassa Singh Ahluwalia as:

"Though, he was very against killing of cows. To stop this, he attacked many times Lahore and Kasur, and slayed the cow butchers."

Twarikh Guru Khalsa, Giani Gian Singh (1894), Pa 734

As far as I recall, the text 'Kookiyan Di Vithia', by Ganda Singh mentions that against the orders of Baba Raam Singh, some Naamdharis killed innocent Muslim butchers (who were killing cows for meat). On 17th Jan 1872, 50 of them were shot for this crime by the British officer McCowan, using cannons.

Unquote[1]

[1] - http://www.sikhawareness.com/topic/4698-why-is-the-cow-sacred/

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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Just wondering, what is the source of Uggardanti? Not existent in Dasam Granth from cursory googling. Not that it invalidates the tukhs you cited, but just kind of curious on a tangent

I think there are a couple aspects to look at here.

First off, without doubt, Sikhs traditionally did not consume beef. Goat and pork were the main delicacies, but beef was a no-no. Ranjit Singh banned beef slaughter throughout the empire, and many British sources noted how the Sikh Sardars detested beef as much as smoking. I also thought I read somewhere that Ratan Singh Bhangoo included an episode in Lahore where Singh's see a butcher taking a cow out to slaughter and put him to sword, although I can't find that now via control+f of my copy of the work (which is this, by the way. I hope it's accurate?-http://sikhinstitute.org/gpp_v1.pdf)

In terms of the contemporary, Nihangs specifically have an injunction against beef. I know that Namdharis, a pacifist Sikh "sect" of sorts, go crazy about cows. They broke their pacifism to kill beef butchers in Malerkotla. 

The more difficult question to ascertain is what does Sikh philosophy teach about beef. From my reading of Guru Granth Sahib and vaaran, very little to actually suggest this. Guru Nanak criticized the Brahmin practice of applying cow dung. Bhai Gurdas also wrote this: 

"

dhaekh paraaeeaaa(n) cha(n)geeaaa(n) maavaa(n) bhainaa dhheeaaa(n) jaanai||
The Sikh ought to treat beautiful women of others as his mothers, sisters and daughters.
 
 
ous sooar ous gaae hai par dhhan hi(n)dhoo musalamaanai||
Others’ wealth for his is as beef for Hindu and pork for a Muslim.

 

corroborated by folks such as Bhangoo, which suggests the religious taboo for Sikhs equivalent to that for Hindus+beef is more like adultery/thievery than dietary restrictions.

 

Why were ancient Sikhs so apprehensive of cow-meat then? Very obvious reason, and that's that the cow is just a culturally respected animal. I personally eat beef (non-halal of course) but none of my family in India does-my father tells me that on his first time eating a burger, he felt very odd about it considering how he thought of cows in his childhood. And it wasn't that there was a heightened sacredness or anything of the sort for him. It was just...cows were considered man's best friend just like dogs or horses in the West, so why kill them for taste? They have a ton of value anyway outside of beef, such as milk and labor. 

 

I openly admit that, yes, I eat beef. Why? I think times have changed, and while I consider myself a Punjabi Sikh and align with that heritage, I don't personally care about dead cows as much as my ancestors did. I haven't found a compelling reason within Sikh philosophy or even codes of conduct to do so (although I do expect if I take Amrit I'll prob stop eating beef anyway as I'll focus on hunting for meat instead of store-bought). Finally, I think some of the stuff surrounding the sacredness of the cow just is sort of ajeeb to me (again, my personal views)-the fixation on cow urine and dung, valuing a farm animal's life more than a human's (Banda Bairagi's discussion with Guru Gobind Singh comes to mind), the fact that buffaloes aren't valued at all and are even sometimes ritually slaughtered, and so on. I do admit, it is always funny how Westerners who will sign petitions online to "STOP the EVIL practice of eating dogs in Korea," yet mock and lament contemporary Hindus+Desis for being "cow-worshippers."

Sorry if there was a lot of my personal thoughts and not enough source material for you. 

Its upto you bro, i understand when you are brought up in a non indian environment abroad its difficult to relate to sacredness of the cow . With beef available in abundant around and with friends all munching on burgers and jerky its difficult to be not influenced .

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Ok thanks for all that.

Umm still a bit confused ... Jaikaara : you gave  quote above but didn't mention where is came from. Can I have the reference please.

"Sikhs gave their lives for cows " - I'm a bit confused as to how far the relationship of the cow is in Sikhism. One one had God is in everyone - so why give more importance to a cow then a human being - doesn't make sense - you would kill a human to protect a cow. Unless like Hinus the belief was that cows are somehow divine. 

And does this mean again that Sikhism is fundamentally an India religion, that can't shake off its cultural tires with India. For instance if Sikhism had spread to an Arab country, there are no cows in the desert. They use Camels for Meat, Milk, travel, Clothes, trade etc. Would Sikhs then give the same value to Camels as they do cows. Or horses in Eastern Turkey - each geographical area has its own Animal of choice.

Also I can appreciate that Sikhs and Hindu due to their own religious beliefs hold the cow scared - but when that belief is imposed on others others that don't hold that belief - isn't that religious intolerance / oppression ? I though Guru Nanak was against forcing your beliefs on anther people ? a bit confused.  

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Ok thanks for all that.

Umm still a bit confused ... Jaikaara : you gave  quote above but didn't mention where is came from. Can I have the reference please.

"Sikhs gave their lives for cows " - I'm a bit confused as to how far the relationship of the cow is in Sikhism. One one had God is in everyone - so why give more importance to a cow then a human being - doesn't make sense - you would kill a human to protect a cow. Unless like Hinus the belief was that cows are somehow divine. 

And does this mean again that Sikhism is fundamentally an India religion, that can't shake off its cultural tires with India. For instance if Sikhism had spread to an Arab country, there are no cows in the desert. They use Camels for Meat, Milk, travel, Clothes, trade etc. Would Sikhs then give the same value to Camels as they do cows. Or horses in Eastern Turkey - each geographical area has its own Animal of choice.

Also I can appreciate that Sikhs and Hindu due to their own religious beliefs hold the cow scared - but when that belief is imposed on others others that don't hold that belief - isn't that religious intolerance / oppression ? I though Guru Nanak was against forcing your beliefs on anther people ? a bit confused.  

Everything is given there ...if you read the posts again and if you are a Sikh enough you will be able to understand.

Horses are jaan bhai are in no way will ever be consumed.

Guru Nanak was against forcing belief on others ...what makes you say that ? i know you are using this statement in a general way and hitting hard where you want to .

Look man i care 2 hoots what you eat ...even if you are a keshdhari and eating halal it wont bother me .I seen enough of those types too.

 

 

 

 

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"Everything is given there ...if you read the posts again and if you are a Sikh enough you will be able to understand."

Umm I'm not Sikh - hence why I come on this forum to learn about Sikhism. It written on my profile. I'm not asking because I want to know if I should eat beef or not. I trying to understand Sikki better.

If you don't know the answer to my question then don't feel obliged to reply.

Ps. Horses are given a high regard in Turkey as are camels in Arabia - but both can be eaten (although expensive). Especially now that horses are not used for war or travelling. Bu thats not what my post was about - if YOU would read my previous post properly. 

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For anyone else who might know - ill ask the questions again:

1) I take it from the above quote that the cow protection/holiness came only during the time of the 10th Guru and then after  - since no quote was given from the Adi granth - Am I correct in assuming that it's not in there ?

2) "Sikhs gave their lives for cows " - I'm a bit confused as to how far the relationship of the cow is in Sikhism. One one had God is in everyone - so why give more importance to a cow then a human being - doesn't make sense - you would kill a human to protect a cow. Unless like Hinus the belief was that cows are somehow divine. 

3) does this mean again that Sikhism is fundamentally an India religion, that can't shake off its cultural tires with India. For instance if Sikhism had spread to an Arab country, there are no cows in the desert. They use Camels for Meat, Milk, travel, Clothes, trade etc. Would Sikhs then give the same value to Camels as they do cows. Or horses in Eastern Turkey - each geographical area has its own Animal of choice.

4) Also I can appreciate that Sikhs and Hindu due to their own religious beliefs hold the cow scared - but when that belief is imposed on others others that don't hold that belief - isn't that religious intolerance / oppression ? I though Guru Nanak was against forcing your beliefs on anther people ? 

 

Thanks

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For anyone else who might know - ill ask the questions again:

1) I take it from the above quote that the cow protection/holiness came only during the time of the 10th Guru and then after  - since no quote was given from the Adi granth - Am I correct in assuming that it's not in there ?

 

1. I would call it cow satva(pure) just as water not holiness. Holiness gives a spiritual status like hindus which we don't. We don't eat cows not for holiness but rather not eat cow for giving milk to humanity. Milk is consider satva (pure) food which in its relative context has its place when it comes to proper diet for spiritual (satva) pure mind.

Not really just because there is no mentioning of cow protection does not meant prior to tenth guru there was none.

2) "Sikhs gave their lives for cows " - I'm a bit confused as to how far the relationship of the cow is in Sikhism. One one had God is in everyone - so why give more importance to a cow then a human being - doesn't make sense - you would kill a human to protect a cow. Unless like Hinus the belief was that cows are somehow divine. 

2. You are taking relative quote based on circumstances out of context. There is no confusion as such as message of mool mantar is clear and cut. Again who said about killing a human being over a cow. In the past, we defended cow slaughters usually on premises over challenge from mughals/muslims who were taking over a india, they were making a statement by killing a cow. We defended against cow killing by fascist muslism/mughals to set the record straight as they were making a statement.

In nepal, there is cow slaughter ritual by hindus in india and in nepal there to their demi god. You don't see sikhs fighting them or giving up their life for it.

 

3) does this mean again that Sikhism is fundamentally an India religion, that can't shake off its cultural tires with India. For instance if Sikhism had spread to an Arab country, there are no cows in the desert. They use Camels for Meat, Milk, travel, Clothes, trade etc. Would Sikhs then give the same value to Camels as they do cows. Or horses in Eastern Turkey - each geographical area has its own Animal of choice.

3. Your point is invalid as you are using historical examples or events to draw a broader  conclusion

 

4) Also I can appreciate that Sikhs and Hindu due to their own religious beliefs hold the cow scared - but when that belief is imposed on others others that don't hold that belief - isn't that religious intolerance / oppression ? I though Guru Nanak was against forcing your beliefs on anther people ? 

 

4. This is what happens when you take out historical account out of context then top of it draw our own narrative out of it. Classic example is infront of you - cow is slaughtered in massive amounts in nepal and also in india yet we don't impose our beleifs on them, those previous quotes from ugardanati along with sikhs have a given up their life for cows has to be properly contextualized, conceptualized within historical framework of mughal era where mughals were slaughtering cows to make clear statement as they were invading and we gave our lives stopping cows slaughter by fighting back with mughals.

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Thanks N3O Singh,

Really appreciate the response.

OK to answer your points ;

1. I would call it cow satva(pure) just as water not holiness. Holiness gives a spiritual status like hindus which we don't. We don't eat cows not for holiness but rather not eat cow for giving milk to humanity. Milk is consider satva (pure) food which in its relative context has its place when it comes to proper diet for spiritual (satva) pure mind.

Not really just because there is no mentioning of cow protection does not meant prior to tenth guru there was none.

So if cows are considered pure, simply due to them providing milk, what about goats, camels, buffalo's, etc are they also equally pure. Also what about chickens that give eggs ?

I take from your responce there is no proof from the SGGS, so what other proof is there that there was cow protection prior to the 10th Guru by the first gurus? especially Guru Nanak ?

 

2. You are taking relative quote based on circumstances out of context. There is no confusion as such as message of mool mantar is clear and cut. Again who said about killing a human being over a cow. In the past, we defended cow slaughters usually on premises over challenge from mughals/muslims who were taking over a india, they were making a statement by killing a cow. We defended against cow killing by fascist muslism/mughals to set the record straight as they were making a statement.

In nepal, there is cow slaughter ritual by hindus in india and in nepal there to their demi god. You don't see sikhs fighting them or giving up their life for it.

 

Umm OK I'll allow you to elaborate on how I took the point out of context. - I might have missed something.

The Idea that Muslims in the form of the Mughal empire were killing cows to make a point - to whom exactly ? Sikhs were very few in number - compared to the very large Mughal empire  - and Muslims prior to the Mughals had ruled India for centuries before - under the Dehli sultanate and the 6 other Muslim sultanates that came after.  Also Raja Rinjit Singh banned cow slaughter all over India, not just slaughter done for other then food purposes. Why?

Yes Sikhs are not fighting Hindus in Nepal or in India probably because they couldn't. It would be interesting to see under Sikh rule what would law in Nepal be like - but we can't see that can we. Same reasons Sikhs are not fighting animal cruelty in the way beef is produced in the west - just have to see a few documentaries to see the level of cruelty. Simple reason is its not feasible - don't have the power to do so.

 

3. Your point is invalid as you are using historical examples or events to draw a broader  conclusion

OK - I thought I was giving historical evidence to enquire of the Sikhs relationship to the cow - and making an observation not coming to a conclusion. You yourself have just said it was because the cow is pure as it gives milk or sustenance. I'm simply asking would that logic work in other parts of the world were the cow is not the main animal that gives sustenance. In the desert the camel does - so do the same rules apply. If not, then why?

4. This is what happens when you take out historical account out of context then top of it draw our own narrative out of it. Classic example is infront of you - cow is slaughtered in massive amounts in nepal and also in india yet we don't impose our beleifs on them, those previous quotes from ugardanati along with sikhs have a given up their life for cows has to be properly contextualized, conceptualized within historical framework of mughal era where mughals were slaughtering cows to make clear statement as they were invading and we gave our lives stopping cows slaughter by fighting back with mughals.

well please put it into context for me. I've not just based my observation on one particular incident alone. There were quite a few wars over cows I'm told by Sikhs. I've read many statements on this forum about how Sikhs regard cows to be holy or pure as you might say. And how cow slaughter - not cruelty - but simple slaughter for food - was banned by Sikhs that had the power to do so - in the past. Of course Sikhs didn't fight cow slaughter in Nepal, or China, or Turkey - because they couldn't. Of course now, most Sikhs don't even practice their faith like amritdaris do, especially in the west - so kind of pointless trying to stop non Sikhs from eaten cows.

The only time Sikhs have had really political power is under Raja Ranjit Singh - although limited to 40 odd years, and riddled with corruption and controversy - he did ban cow slaughter all together. - not just that which was done out of malice or political reasons. Sikhs never had any real power after that or anywhere outside India - so can't give any other examples.

Until Sikhs get Khalistan - I guess we are stuck with these examples aren't we.

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1. I would call it cow satva(pure) just as water not holiness. Holiness gives a spiritual status like hindus which we don't. We don't eat cows not for holiness but rather not eat cow for giving milk to humanity. Milk is consider satva (pure) food which in its relative context has its place when it comes to proper diet for spiritual (satva) pure mind.

Not really just because there is no mentioning of cow protection does not meant prior to tenth guru there was none.

 

But we hate buffaloes and Punish them for giving us more milk than cows ,that's why Punjab is one of leading state in Buffalo meat export

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@kdsingh80 - " Punish them for giving us more milk than cows "   ,Are you serious or joking ??? 

It was sarcastic 80% of milk in Punjab comes from Buffaloes ,they are backbone of of rural economy , yet nobody call them mother or don;t want to ban their slaughter .Infact Punjab is one leading states from where Buffalo meat is exported , so what is this? Punishment you decide 

 

Also there are reports  that farmers including in Punjab re giving up cows as value of cow go to zero when they become dry while buffaloes always fetch goof price.

 

Do you think it make any sense not to oppose slaughter of buffalo while giving argument like cow give milk so and so

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@Paapiman - Thanks for the quote - but is that from a rehit nama or is it a gurus words or is it from the author of the book. - I don't know who Guru Kian Saakhian is i'm afraid.

I was looking for proof from the actual scripture or words of the Gurus themselves, especially Guru Nanak. 

@kdsingh80 : Thanks for the info - thats very interesting - exactly what I was getting at : why is the cow so revered as great provided or milk when - as you sau 80% of the milk is from a different animal. AND THIS IS IN PUNJAB ! 

There is obvious bias here - most likely due to an affinity to Hinduism against Islam ??? If this is then it rises many questions on the political influence on Sikki beliefs.    

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The relationship between the cow and Sikhism has long since intrigued  me. A recent post leads me to ask " what is the relationship between the sacredness of the cow and Sikhism?

There is no relationship that is any extra-special than between Sikhs and other animals. For Sikhs we don't kill/eat any animals that provide us assistance in this world. Most people in the world live from cows milk. I asked my Vidya Guru about it once, he told me that just as a child lives from his mother's milk, he would never think of harming her, humans live majority of their lives on the sustenance of coes milk, so we should not harm/kill them for food. It was clear to me, and we never discussed it again.

Did any of the Guru's or do any of the Sikh scripture promote the idea of sacredness to the cow? If so, can someone give me some proof?

No.

 

I know there were battles fought over protecting the cow - not sure how many, anyone have any idea? where there any during the time of the Gurus.

AFAIK, there were no battles fought over protecting the cow by the Gurus.

 

 

What about other animals that are revered in Hinduism, I know the 24 incarnations mentions certain animals that are revered in the Hindu faith, Is it the same in Sikki?

No. Only those animals which help humans are protected/not harmed. These include cows, buffaloes, horses, elephants and dogs. Could be some more. Hinduism reveres differet=nt animal by regional practices. In Rajasthan there is a place where they eat with rats. In some places in India, they marry a girl with a dog before marrying her to a man.

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Thanks chatanga1

OK. You said you don't eat any animals that provide sustenance? All animals that are killed for meat give some type of sustenance. Chicken = eggs Goats/cows/buffalo/ camels = milk, sheep = wool fish = caviare/fish oil etc - you mentioned cows, buffaloes, horses, elephants and dogs. why not the sheep or the chicken. In fact according to one scientific study if all the insects on this planet died, all life on earth would die within 50 years - As they are vital to the eco-system. Why aren't they holy? I guess why are some animals chosen based on bias culturally specific ideals and not all animals - as they are Gods creations - or as some would say on  this forum - God in a form of his creation?   

Also I'm not sure if you read all the posts but it seems according to kdsingh80 - 80% of the milk in the Punjab is actually from buffaloes. So is the buffalo revered now more then the cow?

OK - So now Guru ever went tot battle or (at least the early ones) ever mention the cow being any more special then any other animal - thanks. I wonder if everyone on this forum agrees.

 

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I was looking for proof from the actual scripture or words of the Gurus themselves, especially Guru Nanak. 

 

The quotes from a scripture have already been provided to you. Please check one of the posts above, made by Jaikara paaji. 

For Sikhs, all the Satgurus are incarnations of the Almighty God. There is no difference between them.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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Thanks Paapiman - I did ask about where that quote was from ... still waiting. It's obviously not from the SGGS

Yes for Sikhs all the Gurus are the same ... as a non Sikh I don't see it that way. I see obvious differences in a lot of things between them, especially between the first and last guru.

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Thanks Paapiman - I did ask about where that quote was from ... still waiting. It's obviously not from the SGGS

Bro, it is from SDGSJ (Sri Dasam Granth Sahib). For Sikhs, there is no difference between scriptures (SSGGSJ, SDGSJ, etc). If some people don't believe in certain compositions, it either illustrates their spiritual shallowness, or their victimization at the hands of false proponents.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ugardanti

 

Yes for Sikhs all the Gurus are the same ... as a non Sikh I don't see it that way. I see obvious differences in a lot of things between them, especially between the first and last guru.

This is kind of off-topic. Please make a new topic, if you want discuss the so-called differences between the first and the last Satguru.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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