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paapiman

Sri Charitropakhian Sahib jee Series - Charitar #8

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Warning: Sexually explicit material below. Daas will kindly request sangat, below the age of 25 or people who are greatly affected by Lust, to stay away from this discussion.

Please forgive me for being explicit.
 
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Bhul chuk maaf

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Initial thoughts and things i've noticed:

  • We are in the city of Akbarabad (established by emperor Akbar?)
  • It's a Hindu woman from a royal household (does'nt her last name indicate that?)
  • She is having sex with Muslims. The characters have evolved from only Mughals to also including Sayeeds (Muslim descendands of Prophet Muhammad), The Sheikhs (Muslim clergy) and Afghan Pathaans.
  • The charitras gives a sequence of who came to the women first during the day,- first sayeeds, then sheikhs, then Moghuls and finally afghans, . Is there anything historic about this ? Ie who invaded and occupied India (represented by the woman) first in history?  According to my knowledge, it was the companions of Prophet Muhammad who invaded and occupied India first in the early 700s (represented by Sayeeds?), After the conquest of Northern India, the Arab clergy starting pouring into India to convert the people (sheikhs). Then came the  Moghuls who occupied India around the 1400s (Note that the bani of Bhagat Namdev mentions the Muslim rulers as moguls also and he lived prior to 1400s). Finally the Afghans invaded India during the Durannis in the 18th century... The persians under Nadir Shah never invaded india, they only plundered India.
  • The story continues and at the end, the female (representing India) is in a position to trap all the four Muslims inside a house, whereafter she sets them all on fire hereby finishing them all off inside the house.
  • Could it be a message that one day Muslim rule of India will be finished off ?
  • In order for this interpretation to be accurate, - the sakhi will have to be read as a prophecy as the Durranis occupied India after the jyoti jyot of Guru Gobind Singh.
Edited by amardeep

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6 minutes ago, amardeep said:

The charitras gives a sequence of who came to the women first during the day,- first sayeeds, then sheikhs, then Moghuls and finally afghans, . Is there anything historic about this ? Ie who invaded and occupied India (represented by the woman) first in history?  According to my knowledge, it was the companions of Prophet Muhammad who invaded and occupied India first in the early 700s (represented by Sayeeds?), After the conquest of Northern India, the Arab clergy starting pouring into India to convert the people (sheikhs). Then came the  Moghuls who occupied India around the 1400s (Note that the bani of Bhagat Namdev mentions the Muslim rulers as moguls also and he lived prior to 1400s). Finally the Afghans invaded India during the Durannis in the 18th century... The persians under Nadir Shah never invaded india, they only plundered India.

If the above turns out to be true, then this is a brilliant interpretation brother.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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25 minutes ago, amardeep said:

Initial thoughts and things i've noticed:

  • The charitras gives a sequence of who came to the women first during the day,- first sayeeds, then sheikhs, then Moghuls and finally afghans, . Is there anything historic about this ? Ie who invaded and occupied India (represented by the woman) first in history?  According to my knowledge, it was the companions of Prophet Muhammad who invaded and occupied India first in the early 700s (represented by Sayeeds?), After the conquest of Northern India, the Arab clergy starting pouring into India to convert the people (sheikhs). Then came the  Moghuls who occupied India around the 1400s (Note that the bani of Bhagat Namdev mentions the Muslim rulers as moguls also and he lived prior to 1400s). Finally the Afghans invaded India during the Durannis in the 18th century... The persians under Nadir Shah never invaded india, they only plundered India.

 

I looked at this sequence and thought there may be something in the order of their appearance. But I can't see anything representing the order as written, as the Afghan like ghori, and the lodhi afghans came before the Moghals.

However if you look at these groups, within Indian Islamic society they are elite groups: the Sayeds- descendants of the Mohammad, Sheikhs- learned arabic and islamic scholars, moghals - the ruling muslim elite and afghans - semi-divine islamic ghazis.

I can see the ending though, the woman has woven around her, a web of deceit and when it feels like she will be caught in it, she takes drastic action to free herself. I can see the same in the Queens activity concerning the King's son. She tries to have inappropriate relations with him, but fails, and then takes the drastic step of convincing the King, his son tried to rape her.

Note also how she tried to deal with the situation by getting each man to go to a different hiding place, but when it became apparent that her plan was failing, she resorted to drastic action of setting fire to her own house. This setting fire to her own house to hide her mis-deeds seems to be represented in the story.

The wise Minister is telling the King, subtly that the Queen is trying to burn the house down to hide her misdeeds.

 

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Quote

I can see the ending though, the woman has woven around her, a web of deceit and when it feels like she will be caught in it, she takes drastic action to free herself. I can see the same in the Queens activity concerning the King's son. She tries to have inappropriate relations with him, but fails, and then takes the drastic step of convincing the King, his son tried to rape her.

Note also how she tried to deal with the situation by getting each man to go to a different hiding place, but when it became apparent that her plan was failing, she resorted to drastic action of setting fire to her own house. This setting fire to her own house to hide her mis-deeds seems to be represented in the story.

The wise Minister is telling the King, subtly that the Queen is trying to burn the house down to hide her misdeeds.

Interesting. As the son is the crown prince, the royal dynasty will end without a dynastic heir if the king ends up executng him (ie he will end up burning down his own house).

But as we've discussed in the earlier threads, the gist of each story is that hasty actions is to be avoided and they relate to the main story of the son and king. However, I think there is more than this in each story, so lets also try and look into what other things the charitras reveal apart from how they relate to the wider story of the son and king.

 

 

Edited by amardeep

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3 minutes ago, amardeep said:

 

But as Dalsingh has said earlier, the gist of each story is that hasty actions is to be avoided.

 

This is the wise Minister's advice to the King.

4 minutes ago, amardeep said:

However I think there is more than this in each story, so lets also try and look into what other things the charitras reveal apart from how they relate to the wider story of the son and king.

 

Yes I'm getting the feeling that as the Charitars go along, more and more developments will be revealed in the previous charitars. Maybe we have to go through a few before we see any connection or relevance of the status of the characters, or locations.

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Btw please read this: I think the Charitro Pakhyan is related to this writing in form and scope. It has same setup with a frame story under which hundreds of stories are told (only here between the king and a wife).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Thousand_and_One_Nights

 

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From the above link:

The tales vary widely: they include historical tales, love stories, tragedies, comedies, poems, burlesques and various forms of erotica. Numerous stories depict jinns, ghouls, apes,[6] sorcerers, magicians, and legendary places, which are often intermingled with real people and geography, not always rationally; common protagonists include the historical Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid, his Grand Vizier, Jafar al-Barmaki, and the famous poet Abu Nuwas, despite the fact that these figures lived some 200 years after the fall of the Sassanid Empire in which the frame tale of Scheherazade is set. Sometimes a character in Scheherazade's tale will begin telling other characters a story of his own, and that story may have another one told within it, resulting in a richly layered narrative texture.

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3 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

 

I looked at this sequence and thought there may be something in the order of their appearance. But I can't see anything representing the order as written, as the Afghan like ghori, and the lodhi afghans came before the Moghals.

 

Bro, the Lodhi Pathans were ruling parts of India before the Mughals, but it is fact that they (Abdali, Timur Shah, etc) acquired power after the Mughals too. So the order makes sense.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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The woman is named Anuraag Mati. The word 'Anuraag' means attachment, 'Mati' means mind, IMO the Charitar is talking about how the mind attached to vikars and sensual pleasures is deceptive and brings only shame, so much so that those possessed of such a mind have to spend their life hiding and in fear, eventually such a mind puts such people into the clutches of death.

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6 hours ago, Jatro said:

The woman is named Anuraag Mati. The word 'Anuraag' means attachment, 'Mati' means mind,

Good work. We should start future stories by looking at the names and meanings of the main character.

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9 hours ago, Jatro said:

The woman is named Anuraag Mati. The word 'Anuraag' means attachment, 'Mati' means mind, IMO the Charitar is talking about how the mind attached to vikars and sensual pleasures is deceptive and brings only shame, so much so that those possessed of such a mind have to spend their life hiding and in fear, eventually such a mind puts such people into the clutches of death.

Bro, Anuraag can also mean Particles of love. Anu (particle) + Raag (love). 

The Syed and Sheikh represent Sato gun, while the Mughal and the Pathan represent Rajo gun.

Any connections?

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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Did the lady actually perform a sacrifice of the four men by burning them alive? Some Tantriks are involved in child sacrifices. This lady was a expert in knowledge of mantar, jantar and tantar as it says

 

ਮੰਤ੍ਰ ਜੰਤ੍ਰ ਅਰੁ ਤੰਤ੍ਰ ਸਭ ਤਿਨ ਮੈ ਅਧਿਕ ਪ੍ਰਬੀਨ ॥੧॥

 

Any ideas?

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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The Lady seems to be a Hindu, while her mates are all Muslims. For a Muslim, death by fire is considered as one of the worst deaths. Sulhi Khan or Sulaby Khan (one of them) who had come to attack Sri Satguru jee (Fifth Master) fell into a brick kiln and was burnt alive. Maharaaj talks about his death in Gurbani.

Teaching - If you indulge in immoral behavior, you can suffer a horrible ending.

Any more insights?

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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Fire as a means of execution was not allowed in the early Islamic territories as it was considered the punishment of God only. Some of the companions of the Prophet were scolded by the Caliphs because they executed people by fire. In an Islamic context the woman is executing the men with a punishment reserved for God only.

Edited by amardeep

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14 minutes ago, paapiman said:

Bro, Anuraag can also mean Particles of love. Anu (particle) + Raag (love). 

The Syed and Sheikh represent Sato gun, while the Mughal and the Pathan represent Rajo gun.

Any connections?

 

Bhul chuk maaf

'Anu' probably doesn't mean particle because the Sanskrit for particle is spelled as ਅਣੁ while the Anu in Anuraag is ਅਨੁ which means "following" or "after"

Every detail is important so the different persons representing different gunas is certainly possible

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One might ask, why did the Police show up at her place?

One possible reason - This Charitar seems to taken place during Muslim rule. According to Islam, they are very strict when it comes to such practices (Jantar, Tantar, Black Magic, Witchcraft, etc). In fact, even today, there is a special task force in Saudi Arabia, which hunts down people engaged in witchcraft.

Quote

A special unit of the religious police pursues magical crime aggressively, and the convicted face death sentences.

Unquote [1]

[1] - http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/08/saudi-arabias-war-on-witchcraft/278701/

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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3 minutes ago, Jatro said:

'Anu' probably doesn't mean particle because the Sanskrit for particle is spelled as ਅਣੁ while the Anu in Anuraag is ਅਨੁ which means "following" or "after"

Every detail is important so the different persons representing different gunas is certainly possible

Heard a scholar (might be wrong) do the arth of Anuraag as Particles of Love.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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18 minutes ago, Jatro said:

'Anu' probably doesn't mean particle because the Sanskrit for particle is spelled as ਅਣੁ while the Anu in Anuraag is ਅਨੁ which means "following" or "after"

You are right.  अणु  means atom not  अनु.

अनु mean under too. Therefore, Anuraag can mean "the one who is under love", which can possibly represent God.

 

Bhul chuk maaf

 

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1 hour ago, amardeep said:

In an Islamic context the woman is executing the men with a punishment reserved for God only.

 

1 hour ago, paapiman said:

You are right.  अणु  means atom not  अनु.

अनु mean under too. Therefore, Anuraag can mean "the one who is under love", which can possibly represent God.

 

From the above two, one can infer that the lady is actually representing God (Anthriv Arths).

 

Bhul chuk maaf

 

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Anthriv Arths

  • The police can possibly represent the Jamdoots of Sri Dharam Raaj jee.
  • The lady (as discussed above) can possibly represent God or Jeev Aatma (which is part of Parmatama)

 

What can the four men represent? 

  • There are four types of desires - Kaam, Arth, Mokh and one more.
  • There are four types of Muktis - Sameep, Saroop, Sadhuj and one more.
  • There are four Khanis - Andaj, Jayraj, Saytaj and Uthbhuj

 

Any connections?

 

Bhul chuk maaf

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8 minutes ago, paapiman said:

 

From the above two, it is possible that the lady is actually representing God (Anthriv Arths).

 

Bhul chuk maaf

 

Bhul chuk maaf

Yes, definitely. Just goes to show how deep this Bani really is and how mistaken people are when they just choose to ignore it

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