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Ragmaala

Migraine Headaches

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@Soulfinder

Hello veer,

What methods or medications have you already tried for migraine headaches ? And how many pills are you taking in a day ? Are there any triggers such as stress or certain foods ? Whats your caffeine intake in terms of  coffee and tea ?

How long have you had the headaches, and how often are they occurring  ?

Depending on your answers, lets try some methods for headache relief.

Edited by Ragmaala

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@Ragmaala veer ji thanks very much i am glad that you have made this excellent thread on my headaches migraines which is a really good effort.

The medications that i have used so far is usually painkillers as i have used Codeine doses of 8,15,30mg along with paracetamol and anti sickness. The medication is called Migraleve as that is the brand name.

 

I also use Sumatriptan 50mg which i take after using painkillers when after a hour or 2 they don't help the pain. 

 

I am currently taking Pizotifen 0.5mg twice a day by the gp doctor as i have been on that for a year as a beta blocker type medication for headaches. I tried amitriptyline 10mg but since it was a low dose it worked in the start but not much later on.

 

I have tried Ibuprofen,Naproxen but they weren't helpful as they just upset my stomach and acid level.

 

I have noticed that chocolate is a big trigger now so i am trying to avoid eating it along with chesse especially when its cooked on toast pizza etc that was not nice.

 

I had my ct scan for the head and luckly my scan was normal nothing wrong as i had balance problem at the time as well.

 

Sometimes i notice the tv laptop phone screen movie has triggered my migraines either the next day or during the week.

 

Also travelling on the bus sunlight gives me headaches as well along with migraines. 

 

I have to wear ear plugs when going to gurdwara as the loud sound hurts my head and sinus area.

 

Over 3 and a half years since this problem started now. And i hate it a lot but the painkillers help it.

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Couple of things :

1) when we take more than 16 pills/ month of codeine, ibuprofen, advil, aspirin, tylenol, naproxen, aleve it actually constricts the blood vessels and causes medication overuse headache or rebound headaches.  Neurologists who specialize in headaches do a medication holiday for 4 months for these mentioned meds. But keep taking the meds that you are on. Just make sure not to take lots of codeine...( i worked with a neurologist in past)

2) def. avoid the triggers

3) try this exercise 30 mins am and pm for few weeks.  Sit in a comfortable, spine erect, relaxed Position. Relax your face, forehead, arms, back, abdomen, and legs. Now bring your awareness to your nose,  nostrils and breath. When the breath goes in focus it going through your nose, and into your forehead. Imagine the cooling sensation going through your nose. Same thing with breath out. No strain on eyes and no strain anywhere else. Relaxed. Try this regularly for few weeks...
 

4) plus you can try bhramari pranayam. Its good for migraine headaches. Do a search here or on youtube. 
 

try 3 and 4, give it sometime, and hopefully it helps .

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23 hours ago, Ragmaala said:

Couple of things :

1) when we take more than 16 pills/ month of codeine, ibuprofen, advil, aspirin, tylenol, naproxen, aleve it actually constricts the blood vessels and causes medication overuse headache or rebound headaches.  Neurologists who specialize in headaches do a medication holiday for 4 months for these mentioned meds. But keep taking the meds that you are on. Just make sure not to take lots of codeine...( i worked with a neurologist in past)

2) def. avoid the triggers

3) try this exercise 30 mins am and pm for few weeks.  Sit in a comfortable, spine erect, relaxed Position. Relax your face, forehead, arms, back, abdomen, and legs. Now bring your awareness to your nose,  nostrils and breath. When the breath goes in focus it going through your nose, and into your forehead. Imagine the cooling sensation going through your nose. Same thing with breath out. No strain on eyes and no strain anywhere else. Relaxed. Try this regularly for few weeks...
 

4) plus you can try bhramari pranayam. Its good for migraine headaches. Do a search here or on youtube. 
 

try 3 and 4, give it sometime, and hopefully it helps .

Thanks veer ji for writting this as its really good information. I will try to do this and hopefully it will help the problem. 

 

The pain once it starts is horrible and unbearable. Its hard to get through the day once it starts so the pills are my source of help for it. 

 

I have heard a lot about pain specialists who do botox injections treatment which some people have had. I feel like asking my gp dr about this.

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Brother Soulfinder,

found this following article  on the net, and thought of sharing it with you.

I know how hard  it is when one goes through such painful phases, so here it goes, hope it helps you in some way.

 

Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain

Migraines cause pain as real as the pain of injuries — with one difference: Healthy habits and simple nonmedical remedies sometimes stop migraines before they start.

By Mayo Clinic Staff
 

Medication is a proven way to treat — and prevent — migraines. But medication is only part of the story. It's also important to take good care of yourself and understand how to cope with migraine pain when it strikes.

The same lifestyle choices that promote good health can also reduce the frequency and severity of your migraines.

 

In fact, knowing how to manage migraine pain with lifestyle and behavioral measures, as well as medication, can often be the most effective way to handle migraines.

Find a calm environment

 

At the first sign of a migraine, retreat from your usual activities if possible.

  • Turn off the lights. Migraines often increase sensitivity to light and sound. Relax in a dark, quiet room. Sleep if you can.
  • Try temperature therapy. Apply hot or cold compresses to your head or neck. Ice packs have a numbing effect, which may dull the sensation of pain. Hot packs and heating pads can relax tense muscles. Warm showers or baths may have a similar effect.
  • Drink a caffeinated beverage. In small amounts, caffeine alone can relieve migraine pain in the early stages or enhance the pain-reducing effects of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and aspirin.

    Be careful, however. Drinking too much caffeine too often can lead to withdrawal headaches later on.

 

Sleep well

Migraines may keep you from falling asleep or wake you up at night. Likewise, migraines are often triggered by a poor night's sleep.

Here are some tips to encourage sound sleep.

  • Establish regular sleep hours. Wake up and go to bed at the same time every day — even on weekends. If you nap during the day, keep it short. Naps longer than 20 to 30 minutes may interfere with nighttime sleep.
  • Unwind at the end of the day. Anything that helps you relax can promote better sleep: listen to soothing music, soak in a warm bath or read a favorite book.

     

    But watch what you eat and drink before bedtime. Intense exercise, heavy meals, caffeine, nicotine and alcohol can interfere with sleep.

  • Minimize distractions. Save your bedroom for sleep and intimacy. Don't watch television or take work materials to bed. Close your bedroom door. Use a fan to muffle distracting noises.
  • Don't try to sleep. The harder you try to sleep, the more awake you'll feel. If you can't fall asleep, read or do another quiet activity until you become drowsy.
  • Check your medications. Medications that contain caffeine or other stimulants — including some medications to treat migraines — may interfere with sleep.

 

Eat wisely

Your eating habits can influence your migraines. Consider the basics:
  • Be consistent. Eat at about the same time every day.
  • Don't skip meals. Fasting increases the risk of migraines.
  • Keep a food journal. Keeping track of the foods you eat and when you experience migraines can help identify potential food triggers.
  • Avoid foods that trigger migraines. If you suspect that a certain food — such as aged cheese, chocolate, caffeine or alcohol — is triggering your migraines, eliminate it from your diet to see what happens.
 

Exercise regularly

During physical activity, your body releases certain chemicals that block pain signals to your brain. These chemicals also help alleviate anxiety and depression, which can make migraines worse.

Obesity also increases the risk of chronic headaches, so maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and diet can provide additional benefits in managing migraines.

If your doctor agrees, choose any exercise you enjoy. Walking, swimming and cycling are often good choices. But it's important to start slowly. Exercising too vigorously can trigger migraines.

 

Manage stress

Stress and migraines often go hand in hand. You can't avoid daily stress, but you can keep it under control to help manage your migraines:
  • Simplify your life. Rather than looking for ways to squeeze more activities or chores into the day, find a way to leave some things out.
  • Manage your time wisely. Update your to-do list every day — both at work and at home. Delegate what you can, and divide large projects into manageable chunks.
  • Take a break. If you feel overwhelmed, a few slow stretches or a quick walk may renew your energy for the task at hand.
  • Adjust your attitude. Stay positive. If you find yourself thinking, "This can't be done," switch gears. Think instead, "This will be tough. But I can make it work."
  • Enjoy yourself. Find time to do something you enjoy for at least 15 minutes every day. It could be playing a game, having coffee with a friend or pursuing a hobby. Doing something you enjoy is a natural way to combat stress.
  • Relax. Deep breathing from your diaphragm can help you relax. Focus on inhaling and exhaling slowly and deeply for at least 10 minutes every day. It may also help to consciously relax your muscles, one group at a time. When you're done, sit quietly for a minute or two.
 

Keep a migraine diary

A diary may help you determine what triggers your migraines. Note when your migraines start, what you were doing at the time, how long they last and what, if anything, provides relief.

Until recently, avoiding migraine triggers was considered the best advice. But new research suggests this may actually increase sensitivity to potential triggers.

 

A more useful approach may be to learn to cope with these headache triggers by using behavioral management techniques, such as identifying and challenging negative thoughts, relaxation training and stress reduction.

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3 hours ago, harsharan000 said:

Brother Soulfinder,

found this following article  on the net, and thought of sharing it with you.

I know how hard  it is when one goes through such painful phases, so here it goes, hope it helps you in some way.

 

Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain

Migraines cause pain as real as the pain of injuries — with one difference: Healthy habits and simple nonmedical remedies sometimes stop migraines before they start.

By Mayo Clinic Staff
 

Medication is a proven way to treat — and prevent — migraines. But medication is only part of the story. It's also important to take good care of yourself and understand how to cope with migraine pain when it strikes.

The same lifestyle choices that promote good health can also reduce the frequency and severity of your migraines.

 

In fact, knowing how to manage migraine pain with lifestyle and behavioral measures, as well as medication, can often be the most effective way to handle migraines.

Find a calm environment

 

At the first sign of a migraine, retreat from your usual activities if possible.

  • Turn off the lights. Migraines often increase sensitivity to light and sound. Relax in a dark, quiet room. Sleep if you can.
  • Try temperature therapy. Apply hot or cold compresses to your head or neck. Ice packs have a numbing effect, which may dull the sensation of pain. Hot packs and heating pads can relax tense muscles. Warm showers or baths may have a similar effect.
  • Drink a caffeinated beverage. In small amounts, caffeine alone can relieve migraine pain in the early stages or enhance the pain-reducing effects of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and aspirin.

    Be careful, however. Drinking too much caffeine too often can lead to withdrawal headaches later on.

 

Sleep well

Migraines may keep you from falling asleep or wake you up at night. Likewise, migraines are often triggered by a poor night's sleep.

Here are some tips to encourage sound sleep.

  • Establish regular sleep hours. Wake up and go to bed at the same time every day — even on weekends. If you nap during the day, keep it short. Naps longer than 20 to 30 minutes may interfere with nighttime sleep.
  • Unwind at the end of the day. Anything that helps you relax can promote better sleep: listen to soothing music, soak in a warm bath or read a favorite book.

     

    But watch what you eat and drink before bedtime. Intense exercise, heavy meals, caffeine, nicotine and alcohol can interfere with sleep.

  • Minimize distractions. Save your bedroom for sleep and intimacy. Don't watch television or take work materials to bed. Close your bedroom door. Use a fan to muffle distracting noises.
  • Don't try to sleep. The harder you try to sleep, the more awake you'll feel. If you can't fall asleep, read or do another quiet activity until you become drowsy.
  • Check your medications. Medications that contain caffeine or other stimulants — including some medications to treat migraines — may interfere with sleep.

 

Eat wisely

Your eating habits can influence your migraines. Consider the basics:
  • Be consistent. Eat at about the same time every day.
  • Don't skip meals. Fasting increases the risk of migraines.
  • Keep a food journal. Keeping track of the foods you eat and when you experience migraines can help identify potential food triggers.
  • Avoid foods that trigger migraines. If you suspect that a certain food — such as aged cheese, chocolate, caffeine or alcohol — is triggering your migraines, eliminate it from your diet to see what happens.
 

Exercise regularly

During physical activity, your body releases certain chemicals that block pain signals to your brain. These chemicals also help alleviate anxiety and depression, which can make migraines worse.

Obesity also increases the risk of chronic headaches, so maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and diet can provide additional benefits in managing migraines.

If your doctor agrees, choose any exercise you enjoy. Walking, swimming and cycling are often good choices. But it's important to start slowly. Exercising too vigorously can trigger migraines.

 

Manage stress

Stress and migraines often go hand in hand. You can't avoid daily stress, but you can keep it under control to help manage your migraines:
  • Simplify your life. Rather than looking for ways to squeeze more activities or chores into the day, find a way to leave some things out.
  • Manage your time wisely. Update your to-do list every day — both at work and at home. Delegate what you can, and divide large projects into manageable chunks.
  • Take a break. If you feel overwhelmed, a few slow stretches or a quick walk may renew your energy for the task at hand.
  • Adjust your attitude. Stay positive. If you find yourself thinking, "This can't be done," switch gears. Think instead, "This will be tough. But I can make it work."
  • Enjoy yourself. Find time to do something you enjoy for at least 15 minutes every day. It could be playing a game, having coffee with a friend or pursuing a hobby. Doing something you enjoy is a natural way to combat stress.
  • Relax. Deep breathing from your diaphragm can help you relax. Focus on inhaling and exhaling slowly and deeply for at least 10 minutes every day. It may also help to consciously relax your muscles, one group at a time. When you're done, sit quietly for a minute or two.
 

Keep a migraine diary

A diary may help you determine what triggers your migraines. Note when your migraines start, what you were doing at the time, how long they last and what, if anything, provides relief.

Until recently, avoiding migraine triggers was considered the best advice. But new research suggests this may actually increase sensitivity to potential triggers.

 

A more useful approach may be to learn to cope with these headache triggers by using behavioral management techniques, such as identifying and challenging negative thoughts, relaxation training and stress reduction.

Veer ji thanks very much for posting this as it has got really good information which is truely good and am happy to read.

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Are you all sleeping enough and taking enough naps?

If I feel head pain coming around, normally going for a rest like a nap or sleeping really helps. Don't go for the caffeine straight away for tiredness, it's important to rest.

I think for these migraine situations it's important to get an additional nap additionally to normal sleep. Some people do biphasic sleep which used to be normal not too long ago. 

Also try to keep hydrated, which I am always forgetting about now that I am at home during lockdown.

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Did you try CBD oil veer ji? 

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8 hours ago, dalsingh101 said:

Did you try CBD oil veer ji? 

Not at the moment veer ji as i did go to holland and barret shop. When i asked about the cbd oil if it works for migraine headaches the sales guy said "that he can't say and for me to do online research".

So it does look like a good alternative to painkillers but i am also gonna read and look more into it before buying it.

 

 

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13 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

Are you all sleeping enough and taking enough naps?

If I feel head pain coming around, normally going for a rest like a nap or sleeping really helps. Don't go for the caffeine straight away for tiredness, it's important to rest.

I think for these migraine situations it's important to get an additional nap additionally to normal sleep. Some people do biphasic sleep which used to be normal not too long ago. 

Also try to keep hydrated, which I am always forgetting about now that I am at home during lockdown.

Veer ji yes i do take naps at day time and they do help a lot with the headaches and migraines. My sleep is ok. I have noticed that when i have distrubed sleep in the past that automatically i got migraines so i am keeping a diary note book of when these are happening the painkillers useage.

 

I am drinking water as that does help with feeling thirsty along with other fluids like coca cola, ribena, rubicon mango, lemonade, lucozade orange etc which i like a lot lol

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16 minutes ago, Soulfinder said:

Veer ji yes i do take naps at day time and they do help a lot with the headaches and migraines. My sleep is ok. I have noticed that when i have distrubed sleep in the past that automatically i got migraines so i am keeping a diary note book of when these are happening the painkillers useage.

 

I am drinking water as that does help with feeling thirsty along with other fluids like coca cola, ribena, rubicon mango, lemonade, lucozade orange etc which i like a lot lol

Glad to know you get some relief.

And about drinking coke or pepsi, it would be advisable if you avoid it, or substitute it with some fresh lemonades which is more healthier.

You know what, I do also love cokes, but the day I saw that a glass of coke of 100 ml had the quantity of about 8 cubes of sugar, since that day I cut off its intake, for sugar is the mother of many diseases, anyhow brother do as you wish.

May you keep good health.👍👍👍

SSA.

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20 minutes ago, harsharan000 said:

Glad to know you get some relief.

And about drinking coke or pepsi, it would be advisable if you avoid it, or substitute it with some fresh lemonades which is more healthier.

You know what, I do also love cokes, but the day I saw that a glass of coke of 100 ml had the quantity of about 8 cubes of sugar, since that day I cut off its intake, for sugar is the mother of many diseases, anyhow brother do as you wish.

May you keep good health.👍👍👍

SSA.

Thanks veer ji. It is addicitive these sugar drinks so i only have them if i eat fried heavy food to help with it or for anything spicy.

 

Otherwise i do like a fizzy drink depending on the weather lol. 

 

True the sugar ammount is a lot in these drinks and i will need to work on cutting down as it will help in the long run. 

 

I also love kaju barfi that is the best along with rasmaali which is really nice lol.

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18 hours ago, Soulfinder said:

Thanks veer ji. It is addicitive these sugar drinks so i only have them if i eat fried heavy food to help with it or for anything spicy.

 

Otherwise i do like a fizzy drink depending on the weather lol. 

 

True the sugar ammount is a lot in these drinks and i will need to work on cutting down as it will help in the long run. 

 

I also love kaju barfi that is the best along with rasmaali which is really nice lol.

maybe try to reduce the fizzy drinks.

 

or at least drink ones that are sugar free. 

I would advise replacing them with something like Squash such as Robinsons.

Also maybe reduce the drinks that contain the Caffeine.

 

I think the headaches could be related to coming down from the rush from caffeine and sugar....

 

Try replacing the sugar with Gurh or other unrefined sugars.

 

Since it is lockdown, just don't buy or order anything that contains sugar or caffeine. If it is not near you, you will not be tempted...

 

I saw the post about CBD, I saw that they sell it online at Boots as well.

I think you have to take it a few times a day. I think the part of the plant or leaf that Nihang Singhs use for Shaheedi Degh may be CBD related as well. 

Anyway we know CBD is kind of panth approved LOL

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6 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

maybe try to reduce the fizzy drinks.

 

or at least drink ones that are sugar free. 

I would advise replacing them with something like Squash such as Robinsons.

Also maybe reduce the drinks that contain the Caffeine.

 

I think the headaches could be related to coming down from the rush from caffeine and sugar....

 

Try replacing the sugar with Gurh or other unrefined sugars.

 

Since it is lockdown, just don't buy or order anything that contains sugar or caffeine. If it is not near you, you will not be tempted...

 

I saw the post about CBD, I saw that they sell it online at Boots as well.

I think you have to take it a few times a day. I think the part of the plant or leaf that Nihang Singhs use for Shaheedi Degh may be CBD related as well. 

Anyway we know CBD is kind of panth approved LOL

True veer ji it is good to cut down on sugar as that can create problems in the long run as it will help keep my teeth healthy as well.

 

Chocolate is another one i am trying to avoid and cut down as you are correct that sugar is kind of linked to the headaches as i have gotten headaches migraines with chocolates as kitkat chunky, smarties easter egg, snickers,m&ms which i love but cutting down lol.

 

CBD oil is something i am thinking about at the moment but waiting for this lockdown to stop before i go out to the shops before i buy it. 

 

I am actually worried that i might get addicated to using it like a drug,smoking etc habbit and spend a lot of money on it lol. So i am gonna read a bit more about it before buying it.

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11 hours ago, Soulfinder said:

True veer ji it is good to cut down on sugar as that can create problems in the long run as it will help keep my teeth healthy as well.

 

Chocolate is another one i am trying to avoid and cut down as you are correct that sugar is kind of linked to the headaches as i have gotten headaches migraines with chocolates as kitkat chunky, smarties easter egg, snickers,m&ms which i love but cutting down lol.

 

CBD oil is something i am thinking about at the moment but waiting for this lockdown to stop before i go out to the shops before i buy it. 

 

I am actually worried that i might get addicated to using it like a drug,smoking etc habbit and spend a lot of money on it lol. So i am gonna read a bit more about it before buying it.

it is not addictive. I have tried CBD oil. I actually forget to take it and it's already expired gone out of date. I got a 2nd one for a penny at the penny sale. I am trying to get my mum and dad to take it to help them.

It is THQ which is addictive and gives you a high. This CBD is safe. I have the 5% one from Holland & Barratt, I haven't felt any effects.

 

With regards to chocolate, I have more or less quit Milk Chocolate. I have moved onto Dark Chocolate for years now. You start off with regular plain or dark chocolate. Then slowly move onto 60% and then 70%. Some people move onto the higher levels, I usually have 80% bars around as well. Actually I think dark chocolate can help with migraines as well.

However due to my allergies such as Hayfever, I have to try and cut down dark choc during summer as it is a Histamine.

 

Maybe after lockdown you should get a test for allergies and intolerances, it could help?

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8 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

it is not addictive. I have tried CBD oil. I actually forget to take it and it's already expired gone out of date. I got a 2nd one for a penny at the penny sale. I am trying to get my mum and dad to take it to help them.

It is THQ which is addictive and gives you a high. This CBD is safe. I have the 5% one from Holland & Barratt, I haven't felt any effects.

 

With regards to chocolate, I have more or less quit Milk Chocolate. I have moved onto Dark Chocolate for years now. You start off with regular plain or dark chocolate. Then slowly move onto 60% and then 70%. Some people move onto the higher levels, I usually have 80% bars around as well. Actually I think dark chocolate can help with migraines as well.

However due to my allergies such as Hayfever, I have to try and cut down dark choc during summer as it is a Histamine.

 

Maybe after lockdown you should get a test for allergies and intolerances, it could help?

How did you find the CBD bro? And just for the record, the psychotropic (or intoxicating) cannabinoid is THC not THQ. 

 

I've been using 70% chocolate for a while now, it apparently also helps with your digestive tract too I've heard. It kind of makes you relax too, I think it might release some neurotransmitter like serotonin in the brain? I didn't know it was a histamine, thanks. 

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13 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

it is not addictive. I have tried CBD oil. I actually forget to take it and it's already expired gone out of date. I got a 2nd one for a penny at the penny sale. I am trying to get my mum and dad to take it to help them.

It is THQ which is addictive and gives you a high. This CBD is safe. I have the 5% one from Holland & Barratt, I haven't felt any effects.

 

With regards to chocolate, I have more or less quit Milk Chocolate. I have moved onto Dark Chocolate for years now. You start off with regular plain or dark chocolate. Then slowly move onto 60% and then 70%. Some people move onto the higher levels, I usually have 80% bars around as well. Actually I think dark chocolate can help with migraines as well.

However due to my allergies such as Hayfever, I have to try and cut down dark choc during summer as it is a Histamine.

 

Maybe after lockdown you should get a test for allergies and intolerances, it could help?

Veer ji sorry for the late reply i was a bit busy today. Thats really good that you have tried cbd oil from holland and barratt and there hasn't been any side effects.

If it helps with pain relief than i am gonna buy it later on once the lockdown virus tension is better. 

 

I had dark chocalate cereal from dorests brand then straight away migraine triggered off in 3 days in a row and i got worried a lot so i have been avoiding chocolate cereals for a while now. 

 

Its hard avoiding chocolate so i use different types of sweet based stuff as peanut bars or anything that looks chocolate free.

 

I will ask the doctor for a allergy test as it will help.

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On 4/25/2020 at 3:23 PM, dalsingh101 said:

How did you find the CBD bro? And just for the record, the psychotropic (or intoxicating) cannabinoid is THC not THQ. 

cool and CBD, I so rarely remember to use it I don't think I notice anything to be honest. you are supposed to take it 2-3 times a day before a person can probably notice anything.

On 4/26/2020 at 2:33 AM, Soulfinder said:

I had dark chocalate cereal from dorests brand then straight away migraine triggered off in 3 days in a row and i got worried a lot so i have been avoiding chocolate cereals for a while now. 

 

Its hard avoiding chocolate so i use different types of sweet based stuff as peanut bars or anything that looks chocolate free.

yes choc cereal or any sweet cereal need to cut down due to sugar content. Maybe eat porridge oats more, they are supposed to be really healthy. I rarely eat cereal now.

Also a lot of cereals have wheat, and the kind of hybrid wheat for cereal and bread used these days is unhealthy compared to other grains and wild wheat grains. Look at what roti use to be made of back in Guru Nanak ji times. Used to be made from ghodre da atta.

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3 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

cool and CBD, I so rarely remember to use it I don't think I notice anything to be honest. you are supposed to take it 2-3 times a day before a person can probably notice anything.

Yeah, I think you have to let concentration levels build up over time to start really noticing the effects. Also, the effects may be significant but very subtle, so you might not blatantly notice them, but they are there. 

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