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  1. @dalsingh101 IMHO, devout Sikhs (due to the nature of our religion) will probably end up slightly to the left. Bhul chuk maaf
    4 points
  2. https://www.atampargas.org/home/needyfamilies
    4 points
  3. Sikhs, belonging to the LGBTQ+ community, have the option of getting married in the courts. Bhul chuk maaf
    4 points
  4. Let's not downplay how the bhangra industry is a primary force for promoting casteism amongst us too. Here in the UK, a lot of apnay are sick of it. It's like every time we celebrate something, we have a bunch of grinning blokes in girly costumes prancing about on stage. It makes us a laughing stock. Then we wonder why these types of buffoon caricatures emerge........ That's why things like intelligent literature are so important, gives people a less clownish way to engage with their culture. Plus they might learn some new stuff. Use and develop their brains.
    3 points
  5. Bang on point. I remember speaking to Pathaan students here many years ago (pakistani ones), they used to laugh that they were getting blank cheques from america to fight the talis. Americans must be retarded to fall for that one.
    3 points
  6. Personally Ive heard Guru Har Rai more but one piece of evidence for the other iteration is the Kavi Santokh Singh's manglacharan "... Hari Rai, Har Krishan Gur, Tegh Bahadur Chand, Dasme Gobind Singh Guru namo charan ar bind."
    3 points
  7. May I just add one thing, about why we failed in 20 years? Because we all helped Afghanistan — the NATO countries, including Canada.... But as far as security and peace, we fought against the smoke, which was in Afghanistan — Taliban and al-Qaeda, Daesh [ISIS] — not against the fire, which was in Pakistan. So whenever you want to do something for Afghanistan, read the history and geography both, and then go on, talk with all those neighbours around, and do not allow them to have a proxy war. I hope we will not have it again, ma'am. Excerped from this article about Cmdr. Ahmad Shah Massoud, who was killed by militants posing as reporters. His friend Masood Khalili was there, and the above quote is by him. Massoud was an Afghani who fought the russians who was trying to warn the world about the taliban and their backers, before he was murdered september the 9th, two days before 9/11. https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-friday-edition-1.6171560/he-tried-to-warn-the-world-about-al-qaeda-then-he-was-assassinated-2-days-before-9-11-1.6171563
    3 points
  8. Quote According to a research study published by the University Of New Mexico and Releaf App in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, cannabis flower may be effective in providing immediate relief for the symptoms of depression – a condition affecting roughly 1 in 5 adults in the U.S., and often leading to other ailments like cancer, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, dementia, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic pain. Unquote[1] [1] - UNM Study: Cannabis Is Effective In Treating Depression, Improving Mental Health (forbes.com) Bhul chuk maaf
    3 points
  9. I get what you're saying, but we need to frame our position outside of the left/right confines, at least amongst ourselves first. Truth is that we're conservative in certain areas and, and opposite in others. Degh Tegh Fateh. Compassion and supporting/providing for the needy, but also hardcore armed to protect ourselves.
    3 points
  10. I agree right and left is same. Middle way is way to go.
    3 points
  11. Family's fury over the machete killers jailed for life – then set free: Husband and hitman bombard grieving relatives with death threats from India after being deported from Britain Harpreet Aulakh, 43, and Sher Singh, 30, walked out of jail in the city of Amritsar Their freedom let them harass UK-based relatives of the victim Geeta Aulakh, 28 Aulakh threatened murdered wife Geeta's sister Anita Shinh if she came to India The pair were deported to India and were granted early release just months later Two murderers deported from Britain to serve their life sentences in India were released months after their arrival in a staggering breach of the prisoner transfer agreement between the two countries. Harpreet Aulakh, 43, and Sher Singh, 30, were able to hold celebratory parties and fire guns soon after walking out of jail in the city of Amritsar. Their freedom allowed them to harass the UK-based relatives of their victim by repeatedly phoning them and sending death threats via social media. Aulakh threatened his murdered wife Geeta's sister Anita Shinh, saying: 'When you come to India, I will kill you.' He was jailed for life and ordered to serve a minimum of 28 years after being found guilty at the Old Bailey of masterminding the murder of Mrs Aulakh, 28, in 2009. Harpreet Aulakh (pictured), 43, and Sher Singh, 30, were able to hold celebratory parties and fire guns soon after walking out of jail in the city of Amritsar Aulakh paid Singh – who was jailed for life with a minimum of 22 years – £5,000 to kill his wife after she asked him for a divorce. Mrs Aulakh, who suffered domestic violence during their ten-year marriage, was butchered in the street with a 14in machete as she went to collect their two sons from a childminder in Greenford, west London. After the trial, Judge David Paget said: 'It is difficult to think of a more vicious and brutal way of killing anybody.' Aulakh and Singh, Indian nationals who had entered Britain illegally, started their life sentences in December 2010. Eight years later, they were deported to India under a prisoner transfer scheme and were expected to serve the rest of their sentences behind bars. Aulakh had 20 years left and Singh 14 before they were eligible for parole. Aulak was jailed for life and ordered to serve a minimum of 28 years after being found guilty at the Old Bailey of masterminding the murder of his wife Geeta Aulakh (pictured), 28, in 2009 But astonishingly, the pair were granted early release months later and celebrated by holding parties with large groups of men. They documented their freedom on Facebook, proudly posing with grinning friends. In one video, Aulakh is seen firing two shots from a pistol into the sky at an open-air party. And a photo shows him with his hands on his hips next to a marijuana field. Days after his release, he used Facebook to harass his two teenage sons, whom he has been banned from contacting. Taunting his victim's sister over his release from jail, Aulakh wrote: 'What about getting life? You know what I mean.' Mrs Shinh, a long-haul flight attendant who lives in west London, said: 'He is laughing at me because he has walked free, even though an Old Bailey judge put him in jail for a minimum of 28 years. 'What was the point in spending all that money on a trial and keeping them in a maximum-security prison in Britain, for them to walk free in India as soon as they arrive? 'I'll never get my sister back, but knowing that her killers are out many years too early makes it much worse.' Mrs Shinh, 41, complained to the Ministry of Justice and after initial scepticism, civil servants were shocked to discover the truth. She received a letter from Justice Secretary Robert Buckland apologising for the 'deep distress caused by the early release' of the pair. He said he had raised the matter with Indian government officials and had been assured the pair had been returned Aulakh paid Singh (pictured,– who was jailed for life with a minimum of 22 years, £5,000 to kill his wife after she asked him for a divorce In the letter, Mr Buckland said steps were being taken to ensure the killers serve the rest of their sentence in full. While the pair are understood to have been put back in jail, their experience is likely to be very different from a maximum security prison in the UK. Sources told the Mail it was common for criminals to be granted 'weekend furlough' so they could visit friends and relatives. And a month after Mr Buckland's letter, more videos and pictures of the pair partying outside jail appeared on social media. One showed Singh, 30, posing with what appeared to be an AK-47 assault rifle. And last year, a video emerged of a bare-chested Aulakh laughing and drinking beer with Singh at a party. The background clearly shows they are not in a prison. Earlier this year Singh, who had been moved to a jail in western Punjab, escaped when staff allegedly 'turned a blind eye'. Three prison officials were suspended for negligence. Singh is still at large. Their freedom allowed them to harass UK-based relatives of their victim. Aulakh threatened his wife Geeta's sister Anita Shinh (pictured with her parents Lakhwinder and Nardesh) Yesterday Indian officials assured their British counterparts that Aulakh is now in jail. But multiple sources told the Mail he only has to sign in at the prison each day before being allowed to move freely in society. 'Aulakh is well connected in Punjab and has a powerful uncle,' a source said. 'Everyone has a price in India and he will have paid people off to enjoy his freedom.' Mrs Shinh said: 'These men are still out. I have the threats to prove it. Do I wait for Aulakh to get a fake passport, come over to England and kill us all off before anyone believes me? 'He and Singh slipped into Britain illegally the first time round, so there is no reason they couldn't do it again.' She added: 'The UK Government is sending back murderers, allowing them to walk free.' A source close to the original investigation that brought the killers to justice said: 'It's shameful that it was allowed to happen. 'I feel disappointed for the family. They expect to see justice served for the full length of the sentences and they haven't got that.' A Government spokesman said: 'These reports are extremely concerning and we have raised this as a matter of urgency with the Indian authorities.' The Indian justice department did not respond to requests for a comment. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9978861/Husband-hitman-bombard-grieving-relatives-death-threats-India.html
    3 points
  12. That's a whole subject in itself......... Saying that about the right, I don't think the left is all roses either. We're stuck between a rock and hard place.
    3 points
  13. Are you serious?? So she knew he was a Sikh but was calling him a member of some sullah organisation??? WTF???? Globally we need to keep an eye out on the right wing, underneath them they will have closet neo-nazis with all manner of evil plans for nonwhites. Recently (in the UK) a few young white guys have been caught joining these organisations and given really lenient sentences. Rightward lurches (from my experience) are inevitably linked to an increase in race attacks and abuse. Also these panchoday usually infiltrate the police too. Singhs need to be ready for this type of shyte.
    3 points
  14. Anyone see a pattern? ^^^^ Girl, 12, went to police station to report sexual assault - but officers sent her away with OTHER abusers who went on to rape her 15 times The incident happened in October 2007 when the victim, now 27, was subjected to more than 20 assaults by eight men in one night, including 15 rapes Just one attacker, Shakil Chowdhury, now 54, was caught and jailed for six years Greater Manchester Police failed to produce 'forensic strategy', returned evidence to Chowdhury and destroyed 24 items of evidence, investigation found Victim was also subjected to grooming by teacher Paul Waites, now 48, despite telling social workers who claimed she was 'very attention seeking' Victim case to be examined in probe into child sexual exploitation in Oldham A woman has detailed her experience after she put her trust into the hands of police after a sex attack, but was handed to predators who inflicted more abuse at the age of just 12. The young girl was sent away by a desk clerk who told her to accept a lift home with two men who were at the police station over motoring issues. It was just the beginning for the young girl, who suffered more than 20 assaults by eight men in one night, including 15 rapes. Now 27, the woman continues to fight for answers, writes the Sunday Mirror. Just one attacker was caught but 15 years on, and the victim has not received justice, after the Independent Office for Police Conduct found a string of failings, yet failed to launch disciplinary action against any officers. The case is now part of an independent probe into child sexual exploitation - but only after the victim insisted that it be included. Talking to the Sunday Mirror, the victim said: 'It's derailed my life. It's always there, even when I try to move on. 'No child should have to go through what I did. I'm speaking out to protect others. The trauma never goes away. I've still got PTSD. I don't want this to happen to anyone else.' The incident happened on October 27, 2006, when she attended Oldham Police Station in Manchester to report being molested. A man had sexually assaulted her while she drank cider in a churchyard. But, she said the clerk dismissed her as a timewaster, and urged her to leave with two men who offered her a lift. 'The clerk said, 'They've offered you a lift, go with them'. The men were being asked to produce licences for driving offences. 'I don't know how they haven't been identified. There must have been logs.' She says the men then took her to a car and sexually assaulted her. She was then driven to the home of a man in his 40s who she says also sexually assaulted her before giving her money to get a bus home. She was picked up on the next street by Shakil Chowdhury, now 54, who was posing as a taxi driver and promised to help her. But he and another man in the passenger seat drove to Chowdhury's house, where three more men appeared. She says she was raped 15 times by the five men, before being bundled into a car and abandoned the next month. The girl's parents were at home when she returned, having called police the previous evening. But, officers took four hours to respond. She was then examined, and her injuries were deemed consistent with being raped, and underwent days of video interviews with police. She also told police about the attack in the churchyard, but it was not treated as a crime. A senior detective later said this was 'entirely proportionate.' Shakil Chowdhury (pictured) was jailed for six years after admitting to six rapes A report into the decision to return evidence to the perpetrator also revealed that 24 items of evidence had been destroyed in 2008. 'The decision to release certain items of property seems to exclude the possibility that the items may be of forensic relevance to the other unidentified suspects,' the report read. 'The bedding and towel had not been submitted for forensic examination, however, they were returned. 'Clearly, items had been disposed of, and had they been retained from the original inquiry, then it may or may not have led to us identifying people or eliminating them.' When Operation Solent failed to lead to fresh charges, the victim asked GMP to review the original case. She says she was 'failed by the system' - and not for the first time. Prior to the incident in October 2007, she was groomed and abused by a teacher who befriended her online. Paul Waites, now 48, lured her to a Sainsbury's car park after the pair spoke online, and then raped and assaulted her over the course of the summer of 2006. Paul Waites (pictured) was jailed for a further 11 years after the victim reported him to police, to find he had been jailed in 2009 for assaults on other children. Last year, he received a life sentence for raping another victim in Leeds in 2005. It was only in 2013 that she felt able to report Waites to police, only to find he had been jailed in 2009 for assaults on other children. He admitted raping and abusing the victim in 2015, and was jailed for a further 11 years. Last year, he received a life sentence for raping another victim in Leeds in 2005. The woman now searching for answers has since made an official request to access her files, including a report written by a sexual health worker when she was 12, after she claimed a social work she she was 'trying to shock her' when she disclosed the online grooming and abuse to her. It read: 'She is now on her third sexual partner. She has made an informed choice to remain SA [sexually active]. She has a mature attitude and looks older than her age.' Despite her age, notes added there was 'no indication of abuse', and an outreach worker added: 'I feel [victim] is very attention seeking and tries to get a response from me.' In 2018, Greater Manchester Police upheld two of the girl's complaints, ruling that her case should not have been closed after Chowdhury's conviction, and that officers should not have taken four hours to respond when she was reported missing in October 2007. When Greater Manchester Police failed to sanction any officers, she contacted police watchdog, the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC), which ruled a further four complaints should have been upheld including a complaint referring to how the victim was treated at Oldham Police station in October 2007. But the IOPC ruled it could take no further action as the clerk could not be identified. The IOPC also said that aspects of evidence retrieval were flawed and that potentially relevant evidence was destroyed, and that greater care should have been taken with notebooks, which have subsequently been lost. One officer was advised to receive further training. The victim could now have grounds to sue the police under the Data Protection Act. Her case will now be examined in the independent probe into child sexual exploitation in Oldham, which will examine claims that agencies were aware of ongoing abuse but 'failed to respond appropriately to safeguard children and subsequently covered up these failings'. Between 2006 and 2020, Oldham social services had referrals warning 700 children faced a potential risk of sex abuse. The victim said: 'No one tried to stop me from meeting him. I thought he was my boyfriend. It made me feel like it was normal. Gerard Jones, managing director for children and young people at Oldham council, said: 'There were times when vulnerable people did not receive help they should expect and deserve. 'Things have improved significantly in recent years. We were, and are, determined not to shy away from issues, but to gain fresh, honest and independent insight, and learn lessons.' Greater Manchester Police said £2.3m has been invested in a new child sexual exploitation investigations unit. 'Victims of child sexual abuse and exploitation will be listened to, taken seriously, treated with empathy and supported,' a spokesperson said. 'Whilst we cannot comment on the specifics of this case and what was clearly a terrible ordeal for the victim, extensive investigations and reviews were carried out. No case for misconduct was found and all further lines of inquiry investigated. No further suspects were identified.' An IOPC spokesman added: 'While we agreed with the force that no officer had a case to answer for misconduct or gross misconduct, we were not satisfied that appropriate findings were made in relation to some of the allegations. 'In upholding some of the appeal, we considered a detective constable should receive management action over record keeping and evidence preservation to learn and reflect on their actions.' 'I wanted to find out why this had happened. I knew I'd been failed, but I was totally shocked by just how badly I'd been let down.' https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9959579/Girl-12-went-police-report-sexual-assault-officers-sent-away-abusers.html
    3 points
  15. Growing your own cannabis is legalized in Italy Home-grow cannabis is set to be legalized in Italy, following a vote from MPs Reform decriminalises the growth of up to four cannabis plants for personal use Italy now one of first European countries to decriminalize recreational cannabis https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9972709/Growing-cannabis-legalized-Italy.html
    3 points
  16. @paapiman Bro, I couldn't find the above text but may have been looking in the wrong place on the pdf? What do you make of this (from the red line). I'm struggling to fully grasp it. It's from Gobind Gita.
    3 points
  17. I think it's like this. Panjab being geographically at the faultline between the Islamic world and the Indic one, as well as lots of traffic through there over centuries means that the lexicon used is WIDE. SO you have indigenous Panjabi words (for want of a better phrase), words rooted in Sanskrit and words with Persian and even Arabic roots in use (which given the geo-socio-politico situation shouldn't be surprising). When you read old texts like rahitnamas they do have a wide variety of language employed depending on the preferences and skills of the author. Poetic license must be understood. So when you have: hukka hajamat halalo haram The last word haram could well be being used in the muslim context of 'illegal' or prohibited, so the preceeding things are illegal or prohibited for Sikhs. The whole concept of bujjer kurahit is a deep one, and not all extant purataan rahits record them like the above. And I'd be interested to know when the earliest use of this term was?
    3 points
  18. 3 points
  19. Sikhism is not violent or hostile towards LGBTQ+ community, but we must not encourage Homosexual behavior. Bhul chuk maaf
    3 points
  20. This issue need to be addressed by panth. It's like big elephant in the room..no one likes to talks about. However, gay and lesbian Sikh marriages are happening more and more in western diasopra. Panth needs to create small and simple ardas ceremony for them ask for blessing in form of ardas. That should be it. They shouldn't be allowed to walk all over anand karaj sanctity. Anand karaj is between male and female.bhai jagraj singh spoken on this topic
    3 points
  21. I had Darshan of the Guru sometime ago and it was when I had fallen back into maya and stopped reading bani for sometime. It was a dream. I was with another Singh in the forest in Blue Bana we were carrying something and then we went to a tent I think it was and Guru Gobind Singh was sitting on a Manja. I remember bowing my hands but after that I don't remember much.
    3 points
  22. Look, he's been fantacising about being the next Winston Churchill since young. He's made a few gaffes in articles he wrote for the Spectator. But more than this, is the feeling you get in england these days. Tories always seem to play around with the race card. Dog whistling. Whenever they are in power, street level racists get emboldened. That's not to say I think Labour are worth shyte these day either. Where are you btw?
    3 points
  23. I am listening to audio book by adyashanti on the end of your world...really mind blowing stuff.
    3 points
  24. Don't think this is available as of posting. Lots of stuff has been translated in the last few years, hopefully this one will be done soon too.
    3 points
  25. 3 points
  26. From Grewal and Habib, Persian sources of Sikh history:
    3 points
  27. Can we request admin to change the title of this thread as the original poster has not visited since 2014... This title is disrespectful...thank you
    3 points
  28. sahi gal...par kale western dee nahi gal hai,. assi western diah changian aadataan nahi chukde ( jive mard zanani dee barabari, jaas kanun dee izzat, jo khud izzat karda insaan nu,) par barhiaan addataan chuk de ne ( drugs, aseelpuna vagair vagair),,gal hai sadie bollywood ne vee khus ay sab kujh promote keeta hai
    2 points
  29. Thanks. I'm just an amateur. Many who are hung up on correct grammar ( both from India and Pakistan) focus on that and not the content. They won't agree with you. But it is a taste thing, as those from the same locations that bother to focus on the stories or want something fresh seem to like what I am trying to do. I think each book is an improvement punjabi wise on the previous ...hopefully...its now a case of trying to get us westerners equally hooked on Punjabi language fiction and reading habits...a habit that doesn't exist amongst too many punjabis whichever religion they are from, which is why the rest of India are ahead in the development of their own languages...we punjabis whilst very religious do seem to focus on easy for the mind stuff like modern punjabi songs, Bollywood etc and not intellectual pursuits
    2 points
  30. Originally Posted by Kulvanth Kaur in City Sikhs about my book. Now reposting this and the rest of the series that was posted here.. In an effort to keep our Punjabi Language in the 21st century, I am recommending the below. Please take a read, if you are a Punjabi lover, or a novice. Especially for Diaspora Sikhs in my view. Punjabi Language Book Club Synopsis Of Fiction written in the Punjabi language ਓ (O) by Roop Dhillon About the book This is a rare Punjabi Novel. It is written almost exactly as Punjabi is spoken in the UK by British born and raised Punjabis ( in this case Sikhs) who speak Punjabi at home with their parents but were not formally educated in writing the language in Punjab or even in the UK. It is almost the creole of British Punjabi, but not quite as the author has attempted to capture enough correct Punjabi syntax and grammar to make it into an Upboli or a dialect of Punjabi. He clearly has not written it in standard Punjabi, but some of this is because instead of being in Taxila or Theth Punjabi it reflects his specific heritage, a mix of Malva and Doabl Punjabi as one of his Parents was a Doabi and his mother is a Malvain. It also has splattering of Majha and Lehnda punjabi whilst its syntax follows UK English. The Chapters are also unique. Each chapter starting with Oorha, follows the Painti alphabet used by Sikhs to write Punjabi, with the first sentence of each chapter pretty much beginning with a word commencing with that same letter. Thus there are as many chapters as there are letters in the Gurmukhi script. The title also is unusual as it is the letter O or Oorha. The title makes sense when you realise that the main protagonist is a Sikh Maharaja named Onkar. The thing is no one knows about him as he should have died 200 years ago but was cursed ( and his brother than becomes the Maharaja of Patiala) to live forever until someone who really loves him lifts the curse. On top of this ( as the book covers suggests) he is cursed to be a tiger by day and a man by night. This allows him to live through 1848, 1947 and 1984 which allows the author to have him witness all these key dates in Punjabi and Sikh history. So this side of the plot explores recent Sikh History but another side is a critique of modern Indian Punjabi society ( as opposed to those in the west) with all its flaws, such as the treatment of women, the caste system and religious intolerance. As he is a Weretiger, the story also explores a Chinese hunter named Han Ku who hunts him across northern India. This provides the plot. In terms of social commentary the book explores his relationship with Seema who becomes his wife by promise of a rich dowry to her greedy poor father Kumar. The fact that in this day and age women still have no value other than being men’s chattels is explored. But Seema unlike most Indian woman is tough and independent and knows her own mind. It is in effect a modern imagining of the Beauty and the Beast story. The author has written other similarly unique novels and short stories in Punjabi as well, many of them retreading these same themes and having the anger of 1984 simmering beneath the surface. This book however stands out as it is the first example of gothic fiction written in Punjabi. About the author Roop Dhillon’s real name is Rupinderpal Singh Dhillon, but he writes under the name Roop so he is not confused with another established Punjabi language writer. He was born in Hillingdon and bought up in Southall and Hounslow. He loved reading English fiction and when he turned thirty taught himself Punjabi. Then he decided to put it to use and write in Punjabi showing the British Punjabi experience from the perspective of those raised in the UK as a counter to the Parvasi or immigrant writers who pined for India in their books and only wrote about the Pind back home or immigration. Room has written Science fiction, Fantasy, Crime and Espionage as well as Magical realism. However he mixes it all up with punjabi themes in a style or literary movement he has created and he calls Vachitarvaad. O would sit well as a reading text at UK GCSE level. It is also a good starting point for anyone raised in the UK who can read Punjabi to get themselves into Punjabi fiction. Further info For those who want to get hold of the book there are 2 publishers In India there is Lokgeet Parkashan the imprint of Unistar Books In Holland there is BLURB the printing provider for Khusjeevan Kitaaban Links for info http://www.unistarbooks.com/fiction/4224-o.html https://www.blurb.co.uk/b/5057516
    2 points
  31. Im interested in learning and improving my Punjabi. What a loss, we have to depend on English. Renounced our Gurmukhi script.
    2 points
  32. When I was doing regular Amrit Vela I used to do something similar...got to sleep about 10/11pm...wake up for 2am/3am....meditate about 1-2 hours(not paying attention to timing myself...it just varied on how tired/alert I felt)...then I would go back to sleep for 2 hours. I used to do Simran at various times of the day...nothing compared for me to the Simran in the early hours...that's where Simran blew my mind literally. For a couple of years i.ve strayed away...but trying now to start a similar daily routine.
    2 points
  33. Lol yeah not upset at all.
    2 points
  34. Who was the idiot who confused him for a muslim then??? If I recall rightly, it was some janani?
    2 points
  35. I don't know why people still use the word 'Sikhism' and not Sikhi?
    2 points
  36. Nah it just talks about awakening, end of world would be end of illusory world.
    2 points
  37. In 1846 C.E., when they had defeated the Sikh nation of Punjab, the officers of the British East India company found themselves in charge of a vast tract of land inhabited by a proud people with a history of surviving political and religious oppression. The Khalsa Sikhs, the order of "saint-soldiers" founded by Guru Gobind Singh in 1699 had weathered Mughal oppression and rebounded from two ghallugharas, or "holocausts" (1746 and 1762). When the Sikh confederacy was joined together by Maharaja Ranjeet Singh in 1801, it governed a domain the size of France. The Punjab was the last part of the Indian subcontinent to fall to the British, and two short years later, the Khalsa would rise again for a second Anglo-Sikh war (1848-49) before settling in, mostly, as loyal vassals of the British Crown.Badges of Bondage is an account of how the British managed to rule their Punjabi Sikh subjects for one hundred years. It is a story of their stratagems to diminish the beliefs and practices of their subjects, while presenting their own doctrines of government, education and justice, together with their race, culture and religion, as inherently superior. It is an historic account of self-assured agents of a Western power encountering a culture and people unlike any they had known: the Sikhs with their legendary thirst for fairness and their unmatched resilience in the face of adversity.This book, first published in 1996 and now updated and illustrated with historic photos and paintings, is a story of the successes and failures of the British to cow the Sikhs into subservience. It is also the account of a spiritual nation that at times stood as one against schemes and strategies employed by their rulers and their stooges to prolong British dominance of the people of south Asia, by far the richest and most important part of their global empire.Finally, this book is a preliminary assessment of long term effects, past India's proclamation of independence in 1947, of British rule on the habits, psyche and self-concept of Sikhs living today."Your essay makes very cogent reading and I enjoyed going through it. Your narration is powerful and effective." Professor Harbans Singh, The Encyclopedia of Sikhism, Punjabi University"Thoughtful people everywhere will be touched by Guru Fatha Singh's concern, as also benefit from a reading of his first book. His first set of documented writings, succinct and neatly produced, explore the Sikh faith through history. His loyalty to the Guru's purpose is firm as a rock. His understanding of Gurbani is extraordinarily perceptive, and their rendering into English sensitively poetic. His objective in compiling the historic panorama is to re-awaken the true spirit of Khalsa." Sardar Saran Singh, editor, The Sikh Review, Kolkata"The author rightly laments the surrender of the rich spiritual heritage of Sikhism to the so-called secular, materialistic and dehumanizing values of the West planted during British rule." Sardar Gurcharan Singh, Abstracts of Sikh Studies, Chandigarh“I am writing on behalf of the Siri Singh Sahib. The Siri Singh Sahib really enjoyed reading your book and was appreciative of the work that you have put in. You seem to have done considerable research which is well-documented. I also found your writing style comfortable to read, and it held my interest throughout. I felt your approach is sound, for while it does not actually point fingers and place blame, it makes clear that Sikhs themselves are accountable and responsible for their circumstances.” Singh Sahib Gurutej Singh Khalsa, Founder, Akal Security https://www.amazon.co.uk/Badges-Bondage-Conquest-1847-1947-C-ebook/dp/B08TBRNX95/ref=sr_1_291?dchild=1&keywords=sikh&qid=1630190127&s=books&sr=1-291
    2 points
  38. I have started with Mool Mantar Jaap, but i stopped after 40 days. Had some days off, now started again but this time doing Waheguru Simran. I think kalyug is winning (summer holidays, schools are off, kids at home) as i am not getting up on time and doing it little later in the morning. I think i need to work very hard, it's not that easy. Doing about -50 malas of 108 beads rosary of Waheguru Simran, taking about an hour, facing sunrise direction, water in cup next to me, white aasan to sit on, speaking loudly or whispering or in mind, just trying my best for the next 40 days.
    2 points
  39. Absolutely agree... Reached 7/ out of the 52 videos that he has posted and the journey so far has been told in an amazing manner - very structured and simple..with the why and how clearly explained...thanks for sharing
    2 points
  40. Are the numbers for when Kaljug will end in Gurbani or are estimates?
    2 points
  41. Chances not slim, but very common. IMG_6438.MP4
    2 points
  42. Now it is 66% or 60% check the news.
    2 points
  43. Quote The passage below is from the 14th chapter of the Gobind Gita, written by Guru Gobind Singh. One can find this composition in the Patna Sahib bir of Dasam Granth. ਖਾਲਸੇ ਮਾਹਿ ਕੀਓ ਉਪਦੇਸ ॥ ਜੋ ਅਰਜਨ ਕੋ ਕਹਿਓ ਨਰੇਸ ॥ ਏਕ ਅਕਾਲ ਸਭੀ ਕਛੁ ਜਾਨੋ ॥ ਸੰਸਾਰ ਆਪ ਗੋਬਿੰਦ ਏਕ ਮਾਨੋ ॥ 62॥ I deliver this teaching to the Khalsa, which was delivered to Arjuna by the Raja [Krishna]. Recognize the One Akal in all, understand the entire creation as that One Gobind . ਬਰਨ ਆਸ੍ਰਮ ਤੁਮ ਸਕਲ ਤਿਆਗੋ ॥ ਬ੍ਰਹਮ ਗਿਆਨ ਮੈਂ ਨਿਸਦਿਨ ਲਾਗੋ ॥ ਜਾਨੋ ਸਭ ਕਛੁ ਏਕ ਅਕਾਲ ॥ ਜੋ ਦੇਖੈ ਏਕ ਗੋਬਿੰਦ ਲਾਲ ॥63॥ Forsake all caste and ashram's [designated Hindu stages of life], forever be absorbed in the wisdom of Brahm. Recognize the One Akal in all, wherever you look there is that One Beloved Gobind. Unquote[1] [1] - "Forsake all caste" - Gobind Gita (manglacharan.com) Bhul chuk maaf
    2 points
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