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Favorite Panjabi Recipes


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I love cooking, it's like a hobby for me!

But you get periods when you get bored of your current repetoire.

So I wanted to ask you guys, what is your favorite Panjabi dish.

Also, if you know of any unusual or traditional dishes with a twist let me know.

I can't nail down my favorite but I can say that I usually love anything with spinach in it - and I mean spinach (palak) not saag! For years and years I thought saag was spinach until I discovered they were actually mustard leaves......

Also I want to ask, do you guys like pindiaan (okra), I think this vegetable polarises people into a pro and anti camp! When I was younger I used to think it had the texture of snot, but now I'm older I like it.

Edited by dalsingh101
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Thanks for that, I might try the samosa recipe. Thing is you can freeze them after you make them.

I haven't seen mango and lime zest put in them before though! And what is chipotle sauce? Is is commonly available in England?

Edited by dalsingh101
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Aarti has some innovative ideas ...lol Check out her Lassi

Dude, after I watched that I had to go out and buy some yogurt and mix it with fruit juice and honey (+ water)! lol

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I had okra years ago. I can't remember the taste but I hated it.

My favourite Panjabi dish is any kind of daal. Maa thi rajma is great. I like a good tharka - fry onions, tomato puree and cumin seeds and put in after the daal is cooked.

My two favourite sabji dishes are potato & aubergine, and courgettes. Nice with roti with besan mixed with the atta.

For meat chicken is good, and lamb and peas is great.

Saag and mukhi di roti is great too.

A good tip is to keep fresh green chillis and coriander in the freezer. Also try to get whole garam masala and grind it yourself in a blender. The flavour is better.

Pretty standard Punjabi fare! BTW did any of you see the Keith Floyd series on India? I only caught a bit of one episode where he was in Gujarat. It showed some really good stuff. He was crackling mustard seeds and bay leaves in hot oil to really bring out the flavour before adding other stuff. It wasn't just set in a studio either, he was going around Gujarat. Maybe he did one in Punjab as well, I don't know.

Edited by Dharma
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In the old days, in some areas of Punjab, people used to add fruit (small apple chunks etc) and or nuts to sabjiyan, it tastes great, anyone here come across this or cook like this...?

Health wise, its good to cut adrak in large chunks once in a while, so they actually form a main part of the sabji (whichever). It absorbs the tari and also gives great health benefits - increases blood flow, improves condition of blood and helps to heal wounds/injuries due to the above (sustained from training etc).

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My mom puts nuts into some dishes but I personally dont like them in sabzi.

The key to any daal sabzi is the mehnath you put into the thurka, normally I "punn" just onions for over an hour, and add a good amount of mirch and salt to taste. Lassan and tomatoes depending on the daal sabzi. I rarely use any masalas, maybe just a pinch if I feel like it.

Dont add anything to the onions until your happy with how much they are cooked, once you add lassan or mirch to the onions they will stop browning. To cut down the time you need for the onions to cook add salt when you start cooking the onions, this absorbs the natural water in the onions and reduces cooking time. Add your haldi into the thurka before putting in the main sabzi, this allows it to cook fully through and will avoid the taste of raw haldi coming into your food.

Edited by Maha Singh
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In the old days, in some areas of Punjab, people used to add fruit (small apple chunks etc) and or nuts to sabjiyan, it tastes great, anyone here come across this or cook like this...?

Can't say I have.

Yesterday I had jam on toast after years and it struck me how here in the west they dealt with 'preserving' their fruit harvest (before it quickly rotted) by turning it into jam (i.e. strawberry preserve) but in the Panjab they dealt with the same issue by turning fruit (like mangoes, lemons and even apples), into a savory achaar. Same problem - totally different solutions. I know it's sad but I find that interesting! lol

Health wise, its good to cut adrak in large chunks once in a while, so they actually form a main part of the sabji (whichever). It absorbs the tari and also gives great health benefits - increases blood flow, improves condition of blood and helps to heal wounds/injuries due to the above (sustained from training etc).

I love adhrak, and occasionally do the 'big chunks' thing in the old toorka. It is really good for you as you say. I remember having it simply pickled in vinegar as a kid.......slightly more innocent times...lol

I'm trying to experiment with new ingredients now. I just bought some mace (javentry), I've never used it before but am going to try the murgh makani recipe this brother has shown.

Also, does anyone use amchoor (powdered mango I think) or those dried amroodh (Pomegranate) seeds? What are they used for? Are they any good? I once had a pakora with the amroodh seeds in it and wasn't too impressed.

Edited by dalsingh101
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As you get older you appreciate certain foods more then when you was a child, I used to hate pindiya, saag, gobi, mulli, tindeh, thaniya, basically everything apart from meat and a few types of daals. Now I enjoy eating them and experiement with different types of food and ingredients. The only thing which I have and probably never will eat is KERELEH!

With okra, wash them and dry them properly when u start off, dont cut them until the last possible moment before you put them into the patila as the water and natural condensation will make them start oozing. When cooking if they start to go snotty then add a bit of vinegar or lemon juice.

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The only thing which I have and probably never will eat is KERELEH!

You don't know what you're missing! Kerela with yellow daal and rotis! hhhhmmmmm

When I was a kind I used to think they looked like crocodiles......

Anyone try South Indian Dosas? What's it like? Seen Singhs in the local place quite a few times. Have to try it out soon.

Edited by dalsingh101
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I used to by fussy with some foods also, but I now I eat everything (veg).

Kareleh, I only used to eat the stuffing (if you make it that way), but after learning that the skin is in fact highly medicinal (Indian Super Food), I now eat, and have begun to aquire a taste for Kareleh in their full form!!

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Dosas are nice and are worth a try if youve never had them, its basically aloo filling with different types of veg, in a thin pastry, with a coconut dip and a chilli soup.

I think Ill try making kerele one day and see how they come out, when i tried them as a kid they were very bitter, had some jungli kerele once in india also and that made my opinion of them even worse lol.

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As you get older you appreciate certain foods more then when you was a child, I used to hate pindiya, saag, gobi, mulli, tindeh, thaniya, basically everything apart from meat and a few types of daals. Now I enjoy eating them and experiement with different types of food and ingredients. The only thing which I have and probably never will eat is KERELEH!

Pindiya....gobi....mulli...tindeh...kareleh...I will never eat them!

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Just to share, new degh techniques:

Javentry/Mace is beautiful. It imparts a very subtle aniseed type flavour to a toorka if you use a few blades right at the beginning when you have heated the oil. Throwing in punjh/che green cardamons is good too. You can have an easy alternative version to your usual toorkha this way. Basically throw them in when the oil/butter heats and cook for a minute or so before throwing in the onions etc. The flavours are in fused through the oil this way.

Also, you guys should try using scotch bonnet mirchaan instead of the usual little green/read ones moms would use. These are MUCH more fiery and have a different type of heat. A quarter or half of a red one is more than enough for your dish.

Edited by dalsingh101
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I use date sugar for mine. You may want to try this Singh's recipes too..

I love this guy! Watch the following clip for an excellent green chutney recipe. Listen carefully to the 1st minute about the connection between onions and mother-in-laws. "I am not crying." LOL

K.

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Have you tried this:

Slice up an aubergine. Make a batter from besan, water, beaten egg, lemon juice, mirch, masala, ground coriander seeds, and salt. Heat a frying pan with sunflower oil in it. Dip the aubergine in the batter and fry until browned (about couple of minutes each side).

It's really nice!

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Listen carefully to the 1st minute about the connection between onions and mother-in-laws. "I am not crying." LOL

Just saw it!! lol!!

Feel the love!

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