Jump to content

Guru'z wifes


Recommended Posts

As far as i understand this, the Gurus only had one wife. There is a misconception thats the Gurus had more than one. This is because, The Gurus wife's name would change after marriage as was the custom then. Books refer to the wives by either name, the maiden one or the married one. This confused most people as they thought the Gurus had more than one wife.

If i have misunderstood this, then sorry

Btw, is there something special about Gits Rasmalai that we don't know about? :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeh...

basically historian have royally F****D up our history....

most of it dun by the christian missionaries....

so listen ppl...dont believe evrything u c in a book....

at the end of the day God gave you a dumagh...think to urself..does this sound like my Guru Ji...

and talkin of messed up history....another oppurtunity to admin cut on the indian govt for blowing up the sikh library, containing original copies of Guru Granth Sahib from Guru Jis times....and sum sikhs have the nerve to say that the Govt of India were only doing their job!!!

everytime i think of that...all dat cumz 2 mind is that we had saroops of our Guru written by our Gurus, and they were destroyed by the corrupt dirty hell bound govt of india...

and dont even get me started on wat they dun to Harminder Sahib and Akal Takht!!

lol sorry...had 2 vent my anger once i fink about wat they dun!!

im sure ull all sympathise!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

u kno wot....!!!

I dont knwo much about the "history" of Sikhi... bein new to all dis. I ask my bro,a nd he ses its bad to get into the polotics part of it all...! :(

Okay.... so he has told me the basics etc.... :x

so many ppl have stressed to me about all da things Sikhi has gone thru... but how much have they actually gone thru??????? :?: :?: :?:

Ppl i know get so much worked up about it all and find themsleves only getting angry... :roll:

I dont know too much about it. :?

Is it that bad...? :oops: :?:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lol all i can say is look it up...

maybe its not so good...cz 4 alot of ppl i knw and me included you start 2 hate all the hindus...

den u chill out...

but trust me....its mashed...

the amount of gang rapes, the amount of innocent boys taken and killed, the amount of Guru Granth Sahibs burnt...

can you imagine....one of your sisters kidknapped by 15 men and continuously raped....

if that doesnt make you sick somethings wrong...

go to www.carnage84.com

look at what they done to our brothers and sisters!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Why did Guru Gobind Singh have more than one wife? How many marriages did Guru Gobind Singh have?

The wrong impression that the Guru had more than one wife was

created by those writers who were ignorant of punjabi culture.

Later authors accepted those writings regarding more than one

marriage of the Guru and presented other important people usually had

more than one wife as a symbol of their being great and superior to

the common man. Guru Gobind Singh, being a true king, was justified

in their eyes to have more than one wife. This is actually incorrect.

In the Punjab, there are two and sometimes three big functions

connected with a marriage, i.e., engagement, wedding and Muklawa.

Big gatherings and singings are held at all these three functions.

In many cases, engagements were held as soon as one had passed the

baby stage. Even today, engagements at 8-12 years age are not

uncommon in some interior parts of the country. The wedding is

perfomred a couple of years after the engagement. After the

wedding, it takes another couple of years for the bride to move in

with her in-laws and live there. This is called Muklawa. Dowry and

other gifts to the bride are usually given at the time of this

ceremony to help her to establish a new home.

A big befitting function and other joyful activities were held

at Anandpur, according to the customs, at the time of the engagement

of the Guru. The bride, Mata Jeeto Ji, resided in Lahore which was

the capital of the Mughal rulers, who were not on good terms with

the Gurus. When the time for the marriage ceremony came, it was not

considered desirable for the Guru to go to Lahore alongwith Sikhs in

large numbers. Furthermore, it would involve a lot of inconvenience

to the Sangat, young and old, who wished to witness the marriage of

the Guru. THerefore, as mentioned in the Sikh chronicles, Lahore

was 'brought' to Anandpur Sahib for the marriage instead of the Guru

going to Lahore. A scenic place, a couple of miles to the north of

Anandpur was developed into a nice camp for the marriage. This place

was named Guru Ka Lahore. People going to Anandpur visit this place

as well. The bride was brought to this place by her parents and the

marriage was celebrated with a very huge gathering attending the

ceremony.

The two elaborate functions, one at the time of engagement and

the other at the time of the marriage of the Guru, gave the outside

observers the impression of two marriages. They had the reason to

feel like that because a second name was also there, i.e., Mata

Sundari Ji. After the marriage, there is a custom in the Punjab to

give a new affectionate name to the bride by her in-laws. Mata

Jeeto Ji because of her fine features and good looks, was named

Sundari (beautiful) by the Guru's mother. The two names and two

functions gave a cause to the outsiders to believe that the Guru had

two wives. In fact, the Guru had one wife with two names as

explained above.

There is one more very important function in the life of the

Guru and the Sikhs. It took place in 1699 when the Guru founded the

Khalsa Panth. For preparation of Amrit, he took a Khanda and a Bata

(bowl) and asked Mata Sahib Kaur to bring Patasas (puffed sugar) for

adding to the water in the Bata. Thus, Guru Gobind Singh and Mata

Sahib Kaur jointly particpated in preparing Amrit. Alongwith

firmness like steel, sweetness is another great character of the

Khalsa, gifted respectively by Guru Gobind Singh and Mata Sahib Kaur

to them. Whereas Guru Gobind Singh is recognized as the spiritual

father of the Khalsa, Mata Sahib Kaur is recognized as the spiritual

mother of the Khalsa.

Again, people not conversant with the Amrit ceremony mistakenly

assume that Mata Sahib Kaur was the wife of Guru Gobind Singh. As

Guru Gobind Singh is the spiritual father but not hte physical

father of the Khalsa, Mata Sahib Kaur is the spiritual mother of the

Khalsa but not the physical wife of the Guru Gobind Singh.

Because of their ignorance of the Punjabi culture and the Amrit

ceremony, some writers mistook these three names of hte women in the

life of Guru Gobind Singh as the names of three wives. Another

reason for this misunderstanding is that the parents of Mata Sahib

Kaur had decided to marry her to Guru Gobind Singh. When the

proposal was brought for discussion at Anandpur, the Guru said that

he could not have another wife because he was allready married. The

dilemma before the parents of the girl was that, the proposal having

become public, no Sikh would be willing to marry her. The Guru

agreed for her stay at Anandpur but without accepting her as his

wife. The question areose, as every woman desires to have a child,

how she could have one without being married. The Guru said, "She

will be the mother of a great son who will live forever and be known

all over the world." The people understoon the hidden meaning of his

statement only after the Guru associated Mata Sahib Kaur with

preparing Amrit by bringing Patasas. It is, therefore, ignorant to

consider Mata Sahib Kaur as the worldy wife of Guru Gobind Singh."

http://www.sikhnet.com/sikhnet/Youth.nsf/c4c37733ae589b 948725657e000dc8f5/5ff5b3970ea7802287256c7500017ec4!OpenDocument

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it was only Guru Gobind Singh that was rumoured to have had two "wives" - but he only had husband/wife relations with his one actual wife, and the other "wife" was regarded as the mother of the Khalsa (mata Sahib Kaur), but Guru Jee had to husband/wife relations with her... Her parents had wanted her to marry Guru Gobind Singh since she was young and they would not allow her to marry anyone else, so Guru Jee accepted her but did not see her in "that" way, as he already had a wife.. Thus when Mata Sahib Kaur asked if she will ever have children, Guru Gobind Singh told her how she'd have thousands of children....the Khalsa panth..

the Guru's preached and practiced utmost equality, getting rid of several disgusting cultural inequalities that were previously prevalent in the Brahmin/Muslim society of India at the time....

the Guru's came, and light was scattered everywhere...

vaheguroo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gurfateh

Ironic how the article is talking about a rewriting of history by people who were influenced by Christain missionaries! That's a partial truth.

OK, a lot of earliest texts on Guru Gobind Singh ji refer to Mata Jeeto (marriage in Anandpur) whose father was a Khatri from Lahore. The next marriage was of Bhai Ram Saran's daughter, Sundri. Finally Guru ji took a Ramu khatri's daughter called Sahib Devi as a wife, although she was to remain celibate. It is also recorded that of the sahibzadae, 3 were born to Mata Sundri, one to Jeeto (Sahibzada Jujhar Singh).

Giani Ishar Singh Nara in his book 'Safarnama and Zafarnama' states that the issue of there being one wife with different names does not stand due to the inscription on the slab in Gurudwara Mata Sundri in Delhi on which it states that her marriage to Guru Gobind Singh ji took place on 1684AD.

Even Macauliffe who was towing the line of Singh Sabha reform ideology states that there were three wives, and details there history.

Furthermore, Mata Jeeto ji died whilst at Anandpur Sahib. Guru ji cremated her himself and Gurdwara Agampura stands at this place. Mata Sundri lived to over see the Khalsa (the house she stayed at in Delhi is now a Gurdwara). Both Mata Sundri and Mata Sahib Kaur Devi have separate hukamnamae acredited to them (see Ganda Singh's 'Hukamnamae').

Also Kahn Singh Nabha's 'Mahan Kosh' has entries for all three wives. I wouldn't describe him as a 'christian missionary' nor someone ignorant of punjabi cultural traditions.

To understand the Guru's understanding of marriage, we can look to the saakhi about 'wily Anoop Kaur' who tried to seduce the Guru. It is recorded that some of Chritro-Pakhyan arises from this incident.

references:

Giani Ishar Singh 'Safarnama and Zafarnama'

Macauliffe 'Sikh Religion'

Kahn Singh Nabha 'Mahan Kosh'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Ironic how the article is talking about a rewriting of history by people who were influenced by Christain missionaries! That's a partial truth.

OK, a lot of earliest texts on Guru Gobind Singh ji refer to Mata Jeeto (marriage in Anandpur) whose father was a Khatri from Lahore. The next marriage was of Bhai Ram Saran's daughter, Sundri. Finally Guru ji took a Ramu khatri's daughter called Sahib Devi as a wife, although she was to remain celibate. It is also recorded that of the sahibzadae, 3 were born to Mata Sundri, one to Jeeto (Sahibzada Jujhar Singh).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The post by jtSingh is perfectly correct. Someone likes it or not, but Guru Gobind Singh Ji was a husband of three wives. Mother Jeeto Ji died in Anandpur Sahib. Mother Sahib Kaur Ji and Mother Sundri Ji died in Delhi.

The 'Hukamnamas' by Mother Sahib Kaur and Mother Sundri Ji make it clear that these were written by two different persons.

-Amrit Pal Singh 'Amrit'

www.amritweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...