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Which sikh of yesteryear inspires you!


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Waheguru ji ka khalsa, Waheguru ji ki fateh!

I just commented on the ajooni magazine thread and thought "which sikh of yesteryear really inspires me the most?".

I have 2 people and 2 simple reasons:

Kavi Santokh Singh: I have been reading his garab ganjnee teeka and his mindset and astuteness in his thinking are beyond me. I find it to be very very comprehensive and it is a good solid platform for further 'khoj'. I also love the scholarly contribution he made in his time.

suraj prakash granth

Nanak prakash

and many more.....

I also like his pagh on this link

http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http...9CA219%26sa%3DN

The second person would have to be baba sahing bedi. He must have been something else if he were respected by all. Everyone claims him as his own, sevapanthi, nirmallay, nihangs, udasi's, sikh sardars, bedi's.....I actually took a trip out to una to go see the gurdwaray...Very beautifully kept, and restorations are in place to keep it architectural true to its origins. I like his pagh too.

AUTHORS NOTE: PLEASE DO NOT SABOTAGE THIS THREAD LIKE OTHER DISRESPECTUFL MEMBERS like "dr@wrof" (not to name names). Lets keep this serious guys!

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Bhagat Puran Singh Ji

Sachahu orai sabh ko upar sach āchār. ||5||

In a world today, where everyone strives to live off the glory of those heroes of the past, and desperately seek to either establish their uniqueness or prove their membership, here is a true Khalsa, who sought nothing but the blessings of the down trodden, whom the rest of nation ignored. A true nishkaam sevadaar, a true seva-panthi.

http://www.sikhawareness.com/sikhawareness...p?p=80433#80433

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Lets make this thread full of knowledge and information, request to people - dont just give names of sikh that inspires you but state the reasons as well, and their contributions, more information on their jeevani should be greatly appreciated.

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I would have to say two people are special to me, One is Sant Gurbachan Singh Ji Bhindrawalae. I know they are not respected by all and many things are said about non important issues such as that posted on numerous site which people argur the toss over. The reason why they are so special to me is due to me having the chance to clean the complete Guru Granth Sahib Katha by them. i have never heard such great katha with so much knowledge. The Uthanika for most shabads is amazing you understand the reason and whereabouts of the divine masters when they recited their bani. The meanings given for the lines of Gur Shabad Bani is phenomenal. Also the Granth in Kavita they have produced on the life of Baba Sundar Singh Ji is wonderful. However for those who have not heard the katha of the first 14 pages of the sri guru granth sahib ji then the amazing steek of BAba Gurbachan Singh Ji's katha is fantastic is proof of the magnificent gian they possessed of teachings including VEdant texts. I am sure there may have been many other great kathakars in the past and present the only problem is that i have not heard them.

The other great Sikh that i admire is Sant Waryam Singh Ji Ratwara Sahib Walae. Alot of people may say Sant Ishar Singh Ji or Sant Karam Singh Ji of the same lineage but i personally met Sant Waryam SIngh Ji and they inspired me. They really opened the teachings of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji in both their texts and their divans. They again posseseed great knowledge and due to their links to Swami Rama Ji taught alot about 'Andari Khoj' about the Ira Pingla and Sukhman, the Chakra, tha Dasam Dwar and man other things which others tend to keep back.

Both of these personalities remain my inspiration in life and due to both of them my understanding of the braod church of sikhism has expanded.

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Guest Javanmard

For me it would definitely have to be Bhai Mardana and Bhai Nand Lal Goya.

Why?

Because he was the first Sikh of Satguru Nanak. Because he gave up everything to follow his Beloved through the harsh cold winds of the Himalayas, through the burning hot sands of the desert, the dangers of the road, persecution by mullahs...By choosing voluntary exile he shows the first condition to be a real Sikh is be a stranger to this world and to community...His descendants filled Darbar Sahib with their vibrant voices but it seems that today these Muslim followers of Maharaj are not good enough for those Sikhs who have consciously or unconsciously (though denying it) given into the brahmanical spirit of racist exclusion, castism, ignorance and superstition...and they wonder why their community is in such a mess...discriminating against the very blood and flesh of Bhai Mardana: shame on you!

Bhai Nand Lal Goya because of his nearness to Guru Gobind Singh and because of his wonderful Persian poetry that translates clearly the real nature of Maharaj. It is again a shame, though not an unsurprising one to see that modern Sikhs have totally neglected this key to Sikhi because they don't see the need to learn this most cultured and elegant language that is Farsi. Instead they rely on cheap satiks and raagis who massacre the beauty of the words by their clumsy Panjabi pronounciation of this language. But again I am not surprised...

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A little article in rememberance of the blessed Bhai Mardana Ji:

http://www.gurmatstudies.com/sikhhistory/g...bhaimardana.htm

More than 500 years ago, when Guru Nanak set out on his mission, he sang the praises of God with music. Wherever he went, audiences were charmed, entranced and inspired by the unique hymns the Guru would sing accompanied by the music played by Bhai Mardana, his Muslim-born companion. For fifty-four years, Bhai Mardana traveled along with Guru Nanak, whether it was in the cold hills or hot deserts.

Bhai Mardana Ji was ten years older than Guru Nanak, born in 1459 at Rai Bhoi Di Talwandi was originally named “Dana†by his parents. His father was a Mirasi Muslim named Bhai Badre and mother’s name was Bibi Lakho Ji. He was his parents’ seventh child, however, the first six had all died upon birth.

Since they lived in the same village, Bhai Mardana Ji and Guru Nanak became childhood friends. According to the Junam Sakhi written by Bhai Mani Singh Ji, Guru Nanak and Bhai Mardana first met in 1480. Guru Nanak is the one who renamed Bhai Dana to Bhai Mardana (warrior).

As Guru Nanak moved to Sultanpur and started to work in the modhi khana (General Store), Bhai Mardana, already a married man and father of two sons wanted to visit the Guru in Sultanpur. Meanwhile, Mehta Kalu Ji, Guru Nanak’s father asked Bhai Mardana to go to Sultanpur and check how his son is doing. Bhai Mardana went to Sultanpur, but never returned, he started to stay with the Guru there.

When Guru Nanak prepared to go on his journeys to preach his message, he invited Bhai Mardana to accompany him. Bhai Mardana was blessed with something that no other Sikh can claim, that is he spent 54 years of his life with Guru Nanak and listening to his wisdom.

Bhai Mardana is the most significant character identified in Janam Sakhis after Guru Nanak. Naturally, such honor leaves a deep impression in the readers mind. Bhai Mardana enjoyed the unique honor of being a helper as well as a close confidant of Guru Nanak. Bhai Gurdas Ji places Guru Nanak on the prime pedestal while placing Bhai Mardana on second pedestal:

ieku bwbw Akwl rUp dUjw rbwbI mrdwnw[

"Ek Baba Akal Rup Duja Rababi Mardana"

(Vaar - Bhai Gurdas Ji)

Meaning, one Baba (referring to Guru Nanak in Almighty's forms accompanied by the second Rababi (musician, player of Rabab) Mardana.

Bhai Mardana was gifted in playing the Rabab, a musical instrument:

Blw rbwb vjwieMdw mjls mrdwnw mIrwsI[

(Vaar - Bhai Gurdas Ji)

Bhai Mardana Ji dedicated himself for the heavenly and sacred mission of Guru Nanak. Undoubtedly he was the very first to sacrifice himself for the Sikh faith.

When we read the old Junam Sakhis, we can only imagine how many hardships he had to go through on the journeys. Sometimes going days without food, travelling by foot throughout India, Afghanistan, Saudia Arabia, Iraq, Russia, China, Egypt, Africa, and other countries. Bhai Mardana Ji and Guru Nanak went through a lot together, there are many stories from their lives.

Once, while the two of them were travelling through a thick forest, Kulyug came up to them. It was starting to get dark, there were strong winds, branches started to fall off of trees, and dust was flying all around. Bhai Mardana started to panic and run, but soon there was fire all around them and nowhere to go. Seeing this, Bhai Mardana just laid down on the ground and covered his face, he was certain that he was going to die.

At this moment, according to the Pratan Junam Sakhi:

bwby ikhw "rbwb sMBwl"

Translation: Guru Nanak said, "Play the Rabab."

Bhai Mardana grabbed his Rabab and started to play it and sing hymns. Almost immediately, the Kulyug disappeared, Bhai Mardana defeated Kulyug. Now the question arises that Guru Nanak had the powers to defeat Kulyug, but why did he tell Bhai Mardana to play the Rabab?

The reason is that Guru Nanak wanted to give praise to his servant and wanted to show the importance of Kirtan.

From spending time with the Guru, Bhai Mardana Ji started to gain the characteristics of the Guru. He went and played his rabab in the Muslim countries where it was forbidden to play music. When Pir Julaali's son Jul Julaali confronted him, saying that he is not allowed to play music, Bhai Mardana Ji said that he was singing the hymns of his Guru and would not stop.

Then when the Pir asked Bhai Mardana Ji to tell Guru Nanak that he must present himself in the court, Bhai Mardana did not get scared. Instead, he told the Pir that nobody can order the Guru to do anything and that Guru Nanak does not need to explain himself to anyone.

Bhai Mardana was extremely simple, pure, honest and friendly. He was a person of very high moral principles and qualities. Persistent like a child he couldn't hide his inner thoughts and feelings. However, his behavior never irritated Guru Sahib who always treated him with love, affection, and softness.

When Guru Nanak Ji completed his journeys and settled in Kartarpur, Bhai Mardana had a big choice to make. His family was living in the village of Talwandi, but he decided not to go there. He told Guru Nanak that he had spent so much time with the Guru that now he had no one else besides his Guru. For this reason, Bhai Mardana also started to stay in Kartarpur.

In 1534, at Kartarpur, Bhai Mardana, fell ill. He grew weak and hope of recovery was lost. Born of a Muslim family, he had attached himself to Guru Nanak. The Guru asked him how he wished his body to be disposed of, Bhai Mardana replied that by the Guru's instruction he had overcome his pride of the body. What remained of him after death, he said, be disposed of as the Guru wished.

When Bhai Mardana passed away, Guru Nanak himself cremated his body and spread the ashes in the Ravi River.

Bhai Mardana had two sons, Baba Rajada and Baba Shajada. Baba Shajada stayed at Talwandi, but Baba Rajada came to Kartarpur. Baba Sajada used to sing in the Darbar of Guru Angad. There were two sons of Baba Sajada, Banoo and Saloo, who were the Darbari Ragis of Guru Amardas and Guru Ramdas. Their son Balwand and his son Sata were the Ragis who sang in the Darbar of Guru Arjan.

Bhai Mardana received yet another unique honor that no subsequent Sikh could acquire. The middle saloks of Bihagada's vaar are dedicated to Bhai Mardana. This is evident of Guru Nanak's deep love and affection for Bhai Mardana.

That Sikh was so blessed that whenever anyone speaks about Guru Nanak, Bhai Mardana Ji's name is always there also.

Bhai Mardana was the very first kirtania of Sikh history. His Rabab, even to this day, serves as the source of motivation for our kirtanias. Every Sikh, as well as kirtania, can learn a lot from his selfless dedication, sacrifice and humility filled life.

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in short i admire Giani Ditt Singh because he was a great scholar and also coming form a background that sanatanis class as low, he didnt let it get him down and carried on his tremenous work for propagating the true message of brotherhood in Sikhi, whereas people in similiar circumsatnces today have jsut let go of Sikhi and become budists, kristians and such.

Kartar Singh Jabbar becuz he was a sherdill man. I remember reading about him in an amrit sanchaar whuich was attacked by an overwheling number of muslims, and he was in the vangard against them and fought them off. this really impressed me.

chatanga

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Guest Javanmard

Ditt Singh? That Arya Samaji, Gulabdasi racist poisonous excuse of a pamphletist? By your spelling I can understand why you admire him...May Maharaj guide your heart...

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Guest Javanmard

chatanga writes:

"budists, kristians"

"javanmarg"

just a few examples of your spelling skills...clearly the light of the Panth...I submit to you o Chatanga!

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I am myself really inspired by - baba farid ji, his struggle in the bhakti marg. I think we can learn soo much from his jeevanis and his shaloks. It just shows bhakti is not all about gyan but unconditional love is equally important.

Recent Gurmukhs-

Sri Hazur Baba Karam Singh Ji Hoti mardanwale, he was a karak bhramgyani came here to guide us, they say he had 100 students all of them were bhramgyanis.. with one smile, eyes filled with amrit varkha he melted the hearts of katar afghan, pathans.!

Sant Isher Singh Ji Rara Sahib Wale- may i need to say anymore, i cannot describe the words, only he knows.

Bhai Gurmukh Singh Audreasea: He was a great murid of sant gurbachan singh khalsa bhindranwale, who scarificed himself fully by jumping into angeeta sahib of sant gurbachan singh ji bhindranwale..great example of murid love towards his murshid, to read more about it: please check out:

http://www.sikhsangat.com/index.php?showtopic=25658

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With the greatest respect Neo, and I respect the emotionally arousing part of Bhai Gurmukh Singh's example...but surely he was placing way too much emphasis on Sant jis sukham and sthool sarir? Surely the real essence of Sant Ji is pervading everything around us?

I recently went to the Udasi ashram I visit every year. I usually meet with this very very quiet but really warm and smiley young Udasi (younger than me). The last time I saw him he was quietly writing in a jotter. I looked over his shoulder and he was filling it with pages and pages of 'Om'. Well, this year I saw his photo on the wall, no surprise. But it turns out he died last year. When I asked a visiting Udasi about it, there was no shock, not even a seriousness, it was all smiles and 'will of God', and positively reminicing how great he was. I was taken aback because I always feel young people dieing is crushing when they have great potential, there is pain and loss there...thats my failure of course.

Personally my inspiration has always been Baba Jagta Sahib Sevapanthi. I blame him for getting me into this mess many years ago! Reading his amusing total matter-of-fact samdrishti approach to living beings always sends a shiver down my spine. All he saw was brahm whether chandaal or brahmin, thief or sadhu. When Maharaj Ranji Singh visited him, Baba Ji turned up with a bucket in his hand asking what he wanted and why he had stopped him doing his seva. hehe. He wasn't being off, just he couldn't understand it.

The greatest and funniest story for me was one about a khatri who gave him a big lump of money to look after while he was away. He knew Baba ji was a pavittar sadhuso it'd be safe. The next day some really knackered poor people came to the Tikana (ashram) for help in anyway, he couldn't stop himself and gave them some money. This continued until it was all gone. The Khatri came back and was crazed with anger. Baba ji apologised....and thats it! There's no huge moral to the story other than don't be so stupid to leave your savings with a samdrishti sevapanthi! (OK if you want to be boring its got a bit to do with attachment...a harsh way of teaching him that though!)

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