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Bektashi article


tSingh
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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I'm not really sure what you mean by 'aura'. Admittedly, certain places I've been to in the past are full to the brim with tingling sacredness due to the person who was there and their practice which like the company of a good Sant inspires you to meditate and pray (certain deras I've been to, samadhs, gurdwaray, bhoras, Rumi's tomb is one such place, an isolated mountain cave of a orthodox hermit in Greece have such qualities) .

Admittedly the tekke was more functional for the most part. Due to the presence of Selim Raha Baba, his shrine and his room certainly had a similar sacredness.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Well, I'm not really sure what you mean by 'aura'. Admittedly, certain places I've been to in the past are full to the brim with tingling sacredness due to the person who was there and their practice which like the company of a good Sant inspires you to meditate and pray (certain deras I've been to, samadhs, gurdwaray, bhoras, Rumi's tomb is one such place, an isolated mountain cave of a orthodox hermit in Greece have such qualities) .

Admittedly the tekke was more functional for the most part. Due to the presence of Selim Raha Baba, his shrine and his room certainly had a similar sacredness.

Wow, i can only imagine what experience that would've been. Do you feel that there was a certain universal connection that you felt at the place that was beyond the difference of language, ideologies, religions?

I guess i am more curious to find the common denominator that exists beyond our obvious differences in living, communication. The underlying current that touches everyone and anyone regardless of what religion they may or may not follow.

im curious do u live in middle east to have visited so many sacred places or do u travel alot? :)

btw i just want to thank you for sharing your experiences. :)

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Gurfateh,

I know what you're on about, and that feeling of oneness does come across alot, when language is limited the shared expression and understanding is even more direct through people's faces. That commonality factor is there among most mystical traditions simply fir the fact that the experience is one, and from it distinctions and dualisms totally meaningless. I knew this was the gist of Bektashi belief and practice anyway, they have historically had an outlook and role more akin to Sikhi in teaching all regardless of tradition.

I don't live in the middle east, just with prabhu's kirpa, lucky enough to travel a lot.

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