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Sex Selection And The Rise Of Generation Xy


dalsingh101
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Sex selection and the rise of Generation XY

A new book explores western involvement in what has become a scourge of the developing world: sex selection of babies

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jun/17/sex-selection-rise-generation-xy

Sex-selection-of-babies-007.jpg

Sex selection of babies across the developing world has created many societies with too many men. Photograph: Muhammed Muheisen/AP

In 1979 China signed a $50m four-year deal with a UN body designed to help it control its spiralling population through family planning. It was the largest foreign aid package Beijing had accepted in almost 20 years.

But the funds became entwined in China's one-child policy that was just taking hold, and instead of sponsoring an education drive for small families, the money was used to pay for posters in Chinese villages proclaiming "You can abort it! But you cannot give birth to it."

The story of the complicity of the UNFPA, the UN's main population agency, in the tyranny of China's forced abortion policy is just one of the examples given in a book that explores western involvement in what has become a modern scourge: sex selection.

Unnatural Selection by Mara Hvistendahl charts how the trend towards choosing boys over girls, largely through sex-selective abortions, is rapidly spreading across the developing world.

While the natural sex ratio at birth is 105 boys born for every 100 girls, in India the figure has risen to 112 boys and in China 121. The Chinese city of Lianyungang recorded an astonishing 163 boys per 100 girls in 2007.

The bias towards boys has been estimated to have caused the "disappearance" of 160 million women and girls in Asia alone over the past few decades. The pattern has now spilled over to Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia, the Balkans and Albania, where the sex ratio is 115/100.

The unnatural skewing towards male populations has become so pronounced in recent decades that Hvistendahl, a writer for Science magazine, says it has given rise to a new "Generation XY". She raises the possibility that with so many surplus men – up to a fifth of men will be single in northwestern India by 2020 – large parts of the world could become like America's wild west, with excess testosterone leading to raised levels of crime and violence.

"Historically, societies in which men substantially outnumber women are not nice places to live," Hvistendahl writes. Already, the relative shortage of women in countries like China and Taiwan has helped create new markets in women.

They include arranged wedding agencies that set up marriages between South Korean men and foreigners, often women from poorer nearby countries like Vietnam, that now account for 11% of all marriages in South Korea.

There is also a booming trade in trafficking of women for prostitution out of Vietnam and a growing practice of child marriage in China, where wealthier families secure wives for their sons early by effectively buying young girls for their sons.

Much of the literature on sex selection has suggested that cultural patterns explain the phenomenon. But Hvisten dahl lays the blame squarely on western governments and businesses that have exported technology and pro-abortion practices without considering the consequences. Amniocentesis and ultrasound scans have had largely positive applications in the west, where they have been used to detect foetal abnormalities. But exported to Asia and eastern Europe they have been intricately linked to an explosion of sex selection and a mushrooming of female abortions.

Hvistendahl claims western governments actively promoted abortion and sex selection in the developing world, encouraging the liberalisation of abortion laws and subsidising sales of ultrasounds as a form of population control.

"It took millions of dollars in funding from US organisations for sex determination and abortion to catch on in the developing world," she writes.

Even now, when the pattern of sex selection has been well documented and the prospect exists of the developing world accommodating tens of millions more men than women, the UNFPA is refusing to face up to its mistakes and confront the problem, she says.

"The effects of the major UN agency tasked with population advocacy distancing itself from the issue of sex selective abortion are immense," she writes, noting that the agency's foot-dragging has discouraged other global funds from engaging with the crisis.

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they love abortion so much that they willingly blind themselves on the devastating impact it can have on society when misused. poverty, resource scarcity, cultural and religious tension, and tons of horny males with no prospect of marriage... formula for ww3? something has to be done to expend all that spare male energy...

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It is, on one hand, quite strange how whitey makes a lot of noise about aborting females, but one the same hand the issue of mass abortions regardless of gender that takes place in the west is not considered anything worthy of comment (perhaps America is an exception to this?).

So what is the underlying message? That blind abortions, where pregnancies seem to be considered akin to minor inconveniences or unwanted side effects of recreational sex are okay, whilst female foeticide is ghastly?

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Educated people do much more female foeticide than illetrate one

How do you know that? Any statistics to prove your theory?

I was thinking about anatomy and physiology:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embryo

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/mole00/mole00212.htm

Perhaps after educating people in biology they might stop blaming women when they get girls, and stop taking all kind of drinks, powder, pills and medicine because they're told they will get a boy if they eat that.

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How do you know that? Any statistics to prove your theory?

I've come across this notion as well. There have been some studies indicating that this takes place within those deemed to be urban classes as much as the pendus.

When you look at old post annexation literature, the situation seems to have been similar back the (will female killing). Read the paper attached for examples.

Perhaps after educating people in biology they might stop blaming women when they get girls, and stop taking all kind of drinks, powder, pills and medicine because they're told they will get a boy if they eat that.

You've hit on an important topic (in my opinion). There is something about being uneducated or superstitious and having a very 'sketchy' grasp of cause and effect (at least in contrast to what we would consider post-enlightenment though).

I hate to say it (and will probably be shot down for it), but there also seems to be something about female psychology that seems to give them a predilection towards world views that aren't based on logical inferences. This seems to cross cultural boundaries?

Although exceptions exist men seem to be more inclined to thinking more linearly? Actually this is probably the effect of western education as plenty of desi men seem to believe in weird, superstitious stuff as much as the women?

infanticide.pdf

Edited by dalsingh101
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How do you know that? Any statistics to prove your theory?

I was thinking about anatomy and physiology:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embryo

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/mole00/mole00212.htm

Perhaps after educating people in biology they might stop blaming women when they get girls, and stop taking all kind of drinks, powder, pills and medicine because they're told they will get a boy if they eat that.

This is not my theory ,I think I have already posted this on SA but anyway

here it is again

Female foeticide on the rise among wealthy, educated

http://thestatesman.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=370735&catid=35

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Also please look at stats which is written in this thread

http://www.sikhawareness.com//index.php?showtopic=14218

80-90% of elders of various Indian cities are dependent on their son's income ,Now in a tough country like India is it any surprise that people prefer son when they know that son is going to be their only source of income

Edited by kdsingh80
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Dal, what is the definition of a pendu to you?

My definitions vary across contexts.

So in one context (type 1) pendu represents someone from a pend. Nothing else. This is a neutral term. That is how I used it in the above example.

In another context (type 2) it denotes someone who is backwards, small minded and non progressive. They do not necessarily have to be from pends.

I also use pendu to describe people from the same ancestral pend as my family as in 'my pendu' (type 3).

So before any inferiority complex kicks in, realise that I myself am from a pend and have some pendus (as in type 2 above) in my own family, some of whom are not from pends but a lot of whom are.

Hope this clears matters for you!

Do have a read of that paper I attached to my last post. It helps put things in historical perspective a bit. So we realise that this is not a new phenomena.

Edited by dalsingh101
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My definitions vary across contexts.

So in one context (type 1) pendu represents someone from a pend. Nothing else. This is a neutral term. That is how I used it in the above example.

In another context (type 2) it denotes someone who is backwards, small minded and non progressive. They do not necessarily have to be from pends.

I also use pendu to describe people from the same ancestral pend as my family as in 'my pendu' (type 3).

So before any inferiority complex kicks in, realise that I myself am from a pend and have some pendus (as in type 2 above) in my own family, some of whom are not from pends but a lot of whom are.

Hope this clears matters for you!

Do have a read of that paper I attached to my last post. It helps put things in historical perspective a bit. So we realise that this is not a new phenomena.

So do you classify yourself as a pendu from Pindustania?

Thanks for the paper, I'll read it later. I'm a bit preoccupied right now making chocolate cookies for my colleagues :D

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So do you classify yourself as a pendu from Pindustania?

Thanks for the paper, I'll read it later. I'm a bit preoccupied right now making chocolate cookies for my colleagues :D

Unfortunately the old man's side of the family are some of the most pendufied junglee pendus I have ever encountered. They put the 'pend' in 'pendu' and prove that whilst the pendus can leave the pend, the pend doesn't necessarily leave the pendu!

You should make them something more healthy like reduced sugar punjeeri instead!

Edited by dalsingh101
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Unfortunately the old man's side of the family are some of the most pendufied junglee pendus I have ever encountered. They put the 'pend' in 'pendu' and prove that whilst the pendus can leave the pend, the pend doesn't necessarily leave the pendu!

You should make them something more healthy like reduced sugar punjeeri instead!

I didn't ask about your family, I asked about you. What do you classify yourself as? If you don't want to answer, it's okay.

My colleagues always go "Gurjeet, how do you make cakes without using egg", and then my boss was like "please make some eggless cookies for our meeting today". If I ever get fired, I can always start my own cake business, lol.

I don't really like punjeeri.

Edited by G.Kaur
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I didn't ask about your family, I asked about you. What do you classify yourself as? If you don't want to answer, it's okay.

I genuinely find it hard to answer your question. Growing up in diaspora when I did really can cause complications in terms of a simplistic self definition. One's understanding of oneself (from my experience) seems to grow with age and even change with increasing understanding.

Am I a pendu? Well no, but I probably do retain pendu characteristics (as much as the idea seems unpalatable). If I have to define myself I would say I am a Panjabi Sikh whom fate destined to grow up in urban London.

I've always thought one day some one will tweak the recipe for punjeeri and sell it to the west as some health food!

Edited by dalsingh101
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  • 1 year later...

It is, on one hand, quite strange how whitey makes a lot of noise about aborting females, but one the same hand the issue of mass abortions regardless of gender that takes place in the west is not considered anything worthy of comment (perhaps America is an exception to this?).

So what is the underlying message? That blind abortions, where pregnancies seem to be considered akin to minor inconveniences or unwanted side effects of recreational sex are okay, whilst female foeticide is ghastly?

Or what about scaring and pushing black women into it more than anyone.

Another fact is, female abortions are a problem but are not the sole cause for gender imbalance in Punjab (which is what I know is on everyone's mind).

There's statistics to point out that Punjab had skewed gender ratios from the 1800s and is getting better now.

---

People do it, unless you want to get real and pop doctors who do this for murder, just raise your daughters and de-cry it in social circles. If you do it subtly you marginalize that person and change the culture within that circle making it less likely to happen in the future with them or someone else.

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  • 2 months later...

So the west causes a problem and then whinges about it? Hardly surprising.

The obvious way to deal with an abundance of men is to make them emigrate and get married wherever they end up. Plenty of faujis here have married polish or chav girls. Countries that have ridiculous amounts of women are seeing them leave to find husbands. Supposedly Russia has this problem.

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^^

Funny, I went to pick up some food from a Panjabi take away yesterday and witnessed a few desi boys taking their eastern European girls out for a desi meal. lol

Our lot are already doing what HSD is referring to above. The rest of us need to make sure the new generation of mixed race kids are welcomed and integrated into the community and made to feel a positive part of it.

Edited by dalsingh101
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Kids from mixed slavic families probably wont have any trouble fitting in. As long as our older coconut generation dont start whinging or trying to kick them out and British culture doesnt try and claim these kids and fill them with cr*p. I remember when I was a kid making friend's with a guy who's mum was East African and we never cared that he was mixed race. Other indians used to give him grief for it though. I've also come across mixed Sikh-SouthEast Asian folk who've been fun to get to know and they used to be great to have a laugh with. One of the few things I guess the younger Sikh generation gets right. Slavs dont seem to have that domineering, paranoid and derogatory attitude that the Anglo converts and mixed Anglo kids have. The fact that we have no past or current hostilities with these people helps, shared views as well as them being obviously influenced with a Punjabi upbringing. Of course there may be a few hang ups in the future for the part Eastern European Sikhs but nothing I can foresee.

Half freshie and chav kids on the other hand are a completely different scenario. The fact that a love of drugs factors into the relationship and the controlling nature of a British upbringing might really damage these kids. Add to that the Social, who have a thing about Sikh kids and just putting them into care, we may have a lot of problems. Seeing as the Sikh grandparents are likely to be abroad it would be even harder to save these kids. I guess it wouldnt be hard for community elders to get a network of Sikh foster parents and possible adopters ready for the inevitable. But I doubt that the Gurdwara comittees would do anything on that scale. Is there any other way of keeping these kids involved?

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Is there any other way of keeping these kids involved?

Firstly we just need to act decent and open hearted as individuals and shame and clamp down on any obnoxious mf amongst us who acts like a twat (pretty much what we should've been doing with the caste thing really!).

Nagar kirtans and the like help in my experience. Panjabi music also, especially as a language development tool - but again watch out for the jatt fudu vibe inherent in many tunes - just brings us backwards a few centuries. I agree the English ones are the hardest cases due to the factors you've mentioned.

One idea from the Jews I liked was their having GCSE 'booster classes' in synagogues. That would give young kids a good reason to attend Gurdwaras if we could get it going.

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One idea from the Jews I liked was their having GCSE 'booster classes' in synagogues. That would give young kids a good reason to attend Gurdwaras if we could get it going.

As long as you get qualified volunteers and some other resources that shouldnt be a problem. Having some old lady just telling everyone to read their books wont cut it. You also have to think about who will be let into these classes. Sulleh would love to come along and chirps with girls or be stupid to drag everyone to their level in their version of classroom jihad. It may be controversial but if these lessons were only open to ethnic Sikhs and mixed race kids it would go a long way to nurturing that inclusive group feeling. I doubt the Jews let it anyone. But I can see the bleeding hearts getting emotional about this.

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I got the idea from my half Jewish nephew (who is Sikh), he said they were letting in mixed race kids (half jew half x) when he went as a kid.

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I don't think many nonSikhs would come to the Gurdwara to do this but you couldn't say no if they did. I saw a Chinese boy at a Gurdwara gym once. We can't get too insular.

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