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Weird incident....


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I like to share very weird incident happened with me this evening...

I was just driving from nanaksar to my freind house today... on the way i decided to pull off to get some gas/peterol for my car.. when i was about to leave the gas station. I saw an old sikh guy basically lost on an sidewalk deciding which way to go. I thought he is probably new to the country lost his way home. So i approached him, and found out that he was completely drunk and offered him ride to his home. He said he is wating for an gal who wants to get married with him... i cant beleive my ears that i was hearing it from an 60 yr old bloke... and he also said "he doesnt have money or anything". I told him not to worry... he was soo drunk that he can barely walk and he was mumbling his home address that i couldnt quite understand... i just heard the name of the rd he lives but didnt quite understand the name of the street.. so i told him to spell it for me.. and he did first three letters.. so my mission was to find that streeet.. while i was driving he keeps swearing at me... he jumps on the seat and say "Haram Jadaaya Kuttaaaya". I told him to calm down but he wouldnt listen.. anyways i was lost myself for 10 minutes... i have to listen his swearing all the way his house..

Finally i found his street name and house number and stopped my car... now he wouldnt get off the car... i opened up the door for him...he was just mumbling something... then he lied down the driver seat and his pug fell off.. i told him to pick it up .. he wouldnt listen... then i requested him... sort of took his hand to help him to get up.. while his pug was lying down . i picked it up.. he got off the car....then next thing i know he fell down my feet..... i guess that was his own wierd way of thankin someone... i got him up quickly... told him to go inside his house and rest and then i took off with the car like an rapid fire.. sighs... he was an scary character... he keeps screamin and yellin in the car...all he would say "Haramzada Kootaya"...

It was quite sad to see how some old people struggle from drinking habits and kaam more than us (youths) within the punjabi community and even its more even sad to see how their son or daughter let these old people out in night time... give them full premission to drink all they want and wandering around streets and lie down on streets...

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Neo, i hav to say dis to u today, dat ur a very good person fo helpin som1 out like dat...maybe if it wer som1 else in ur place, dey wouldnt have done wat u did..so im happy to say dat im so proud of u today fo doin wat u did, kinda makes me cry :

poor old man, look at Wahegurus play guys, its so sad, dis realy brings tears in my eyes :cry: im so sad..

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:shock: I think you did a great job handling the situation but I would have tried to ask him for his phone-number to check up on him/family.

Veer ji, Yes i tried that as well. I called his home so that i can quickly find out the adress but unfortunately was gettin answering machine....I guess it mean to be end like this...:D

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he keeps screamin and yellin in the car...all he would say "Haramzada Kootaya"...

A recipient of charity feels contempt for his benefactor, because his self-respect has been dented. If you had called him a lousy drunk and driven off when you found him, he would still have felt like a man, your equal, and sworn back. You stole that from him by helping him out and showing him kindness. Without exception, those old guys have a very strong sense of manly pride, dignity and self-reliance.

On the other hand, you in your car represent dharam. You felt that in conscience, you could not abandon someone who appeared lost, confused and out of place. Like the story of the holy man and the scorpion. The holy man keeps trying to pluck a drowning scorpion from the river and every time he tries, he is stung. The scorpion stings him and the man keeps trying to save it because that's their respective dharam.

You should have left him, man. Or else just called the police for them to take him home or to sober up at the station.

Your mistake was to feel a sense of duty towards him as a man from the old country, someone like your grandfather, or just a fellow Sikh. In India, the same man would just give you a good kicking if it was you lying drunk in the street.

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personally i think what neo did was the best thing, whether he was a sikh or not, a bad sikh or a good sikh, neo did his seva by looking out for him rather then just leaving him there all mashed

the guy was drunk and not in a right state of mind, so his swears were probably empty

many times u see people just walk past someone who is in need of help, im glad to see theres some who actually think of others then themselves

:)

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Personally, I wouldn't have approached the drunk buddha in the first place.I can tell a drunk from a mile away, especially a Panjabi drunk.

But what Neo Singh did was his choice.And his choice was good.Neo Singh learnt some life lessons in what he did.And that is good.

Well done.Akaal the Khalsa and Akaal the drunk.Akaal helping Akaal and Akaal swearing at Akaal.

Guru Dev...

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I do appreciate that I may be in a minority of one on this point, but I cannot agree that giving the drunk a lift was a good idea. He would have made his way home eventually, and the hardship and confusion involved in trying to get home would have taught him a good lesson.

Also, he could have attacked you in your car, and while you could fend off his attacks quite easily (probably), in doing so you might have wrapped the car around a tree and killed both of you.

I would add that from the sound of things, he did not sound like a habitual drinker or a social drinker, and a girl/old woman probably had something to do with this.

Remember, he put himself in that state, and he did it on purpose.

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i see what you are trying to say Shaster, but if you see someone on the street, bleeding or hurt would you stop and help them or would u say its their Karma and think who knows maybe he was the bad guy and got beaten up. It shouldn't matter what condition or who that person is in. It is possible that Neo was there for a purpose and saw the old man. Waheguru himself placed Neo in that gas station for that old man. It is not the fault of Neo or waheguru that he will not learn his lesson. The old man himself is ignorent towards his mistakes. We should not defer away from Karms, as some Budhists try to not get involved in anyone or anything, because for them they will trap themselves in the cycle of Karma and would have to reincarnate for their doings so they Avoid doing any kind of Karms.

That man could've have hurt himself or someone else if he was left to wander, he ocule've been run over by a car as well...so you can see where this leads into endless possibilities.

As it was the nature of the Scorpion to Sting, it was the nature of that man to try to save that scropion from the water.

As Mr. §ingh said, the lesson is if you see god or not in all.

This should put it in better words:

There is an old Chinese tale: A fair was taking place in a small village.

There were large crowds and many shops selling different wares. A man fell into a small well nearby, and though he began to shout, no one could hear him above the din. Everyone was so involved in his own work -- buying things, selling things. It was getting close to evening and people were in a hurry to reach home. Shop-keepers began closing their stalls. Who was to hear him? Fortunately a sannyasin who was a follower of Confucius came and sat near the well. He heard the man's shouts and he called down, "Hold your peace, brother. I shall go right away to plead your case, for it is against the law to build a well without a wall. You fell because there was no wall. Have faith in me. My colleagues and I will start a movement for you right away, so that not only this well but all the wells in the villages will have walls." And away he went. This was but natural for Confucius was a reformer who believed in society and its laws. He was a revolutionary.

The poor man called out to the sannyasin, "Of what use are future walls? I am drowning right now!"

The sannyasin answered, "It is not just your problem. It is a problem for everyone, for the whole of society, not just one person. If society is saved, the individual is saved." He stood up and began shouting, "Listen, brothers! We must see that each well be surrounded by a wall."

A Buddhist bhikshu came and sat near the well.

He heard the shouting, bent down to look and saw the man in the well. "You are suffering from your actions during your past life," he said to the poor man. "Each of us has to reap the fruit of one's karma. Nothing can be done about it."

"Tell me about it later," said the man in the well. "First get me out of here."

"But I have renounced all actions," said the monk. "Actions lead to attachments, and attachments cause a man to wander in samsara. I want to free myself from the cycle of birth and death. I don't want to start another karmic cycle by pulling you out of the well. Who knows what you might do if I saved your life? If you kill someone I shall be a partner in your crime, for had I not saved you you wouldn't have committed the crime. Or if you set fire to someone's house? Why should I trap myself by your misdeeds? Besides, please be quiet, I have come here to meditate. You go through your experiences and I shall go through mine. No one can walk on another's path."

Since the drowning man was making so much noise the bhikshu got up and left to meditate. Meditation is a great thing. If one is to go around pulling people out of wells, imagine how many wells there are in the village; and there are so many people, so many fairs, you would never get around to meditate. So what can you do? It is better to take care of one's own meditation, then everything else is taken care of.

Soon after a Christian missionary happened along. Hearing the man's cries, he quickly pulled out a rope from his knapsack and threw it down the well. He pulled out the man, who fell at his feet and said, "Thank you. You are really a deeply religious man. A follower of Confucius heard me and went on his way, and a Buddhist monk abandoned me to my fate. They just ignored my cries."

The Christian said, "There is only one thing I ask of you: keep falling into wells so that we Christians can come to help you out. We always carry a rope. If you were not to fall in the well so that we could save you, how can we attain beatitude?"

No one is bothered about any one else. Man's selfishness is so deep-rooted; the one who helps you is only out for his own self-interest. This sort of service is worth nothing. So look at the God within you -- that is knowledge; and don't ever forget the God in others -- that is compassion.

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Pheena,

You may well be right. However, the difficulty that I have with this type of philanthropy is that it appears to be unconnected with any form of duty or obligation. The underlying principle seems to be one big grey area. Why is this action considered "good"? Drunkenness is always a temporary condition, which wears off over time. In order to get as drunk as this old man, you have to knowingly drink to great excess.

The old man was a stranger to Neo, so there is no duty from that quarter. Also, there is no religious duty to help drunks home (although it does seem a kind thing to do) - it does not correspond with feeding the hungry, etc.

Thinking about the karma this type of action will produce, I'm not sure if it would necessarily be good. Without a doubt, it's an evil for any creature to get completely wasted on drugs or alcohol well in excess of their tolerance threshold. Therefore, in making things easier for a drunk in his quest to poison himself with alcohol by chauffering him back home from his disgusting binge, surely you would be complicit in the crime (against dharam)?

I equate this scenario with the drunk I see if I leave work late in the evening. Others give him a few coins to assuage their conscience, but I would never give him anything because he will just p*** it all up the wall. He came up to me once and asked specifically for money, so that he could buy drink "to help him sleep". He then presented this to me as the virtue of truthfulness. I told him truthfully I would never help him in his pursuit to get drunk.

Drinking to excess has terrible physiological and psychological effects. A drinker has to face up to this reality and feel the pain in full, in order to realise that he needs his faculties as sharp as a knife to make it through life. If he has to face that difficulty regularly (i.e. as often as he gets drunk) he may decide to quit drinking. This will happen because people drink to take the harshness out of the reality of their lives, and if they find that drinking only brings more harshness they will make a simple equation and give up.

The knock-on effect of Neo's actions in particular (not knocking Neo here - I'm sure he's a nice guy who was well-meaning on that occasion) will mean that the jealous and macho Punjabi - whose pride has been dented by needing the help of someone he looks on as a child just to take him home - will take it out on his wife or children (if he has any). This is because he will feel worthless and humiliated. He will beat them, throw them out of the house a few times, etc. That's what drunks do. Without exception.

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You did 'sewa' (service). The God sees what we do. You did a good 'Karam' (action); you will get a prize ('Karam-phal') (prize for action) for this 'sewa', if you did this 'sewa' for any 'karam-phal'. The drunkard abused you. It was his 'karam'. He will get the 'karam-phal'.

But, a Gursikh does not want any prize for his good 'Karam'. A Gursikh is always a 'Nish-kaam', (without any desire). What you do should always be a 'Nish-kaam karam'. The evildoer abused you. It was his 'sanskaar'. Being a Gursikh, if you find him again in a difficult situation, help him. If he again abuses you, forgive him. He abuses, because of his 'sanskaar'. You should help him in every situation. How can you stop yourself to help a thankless person? You too have a 'sanskaar': -

"Kabeer sant na chhaadai santyee, jau kotik milainh asant.

Maliyaagar bhuyamgam bedhhiyo, ta seetalta na tajant".

(Kabeer, the Saint does not forsake his Saintly nature, even though he meets with millions of evildoers. Even when sandalwood is surrounded by snakes, it does not give up its cooling fragrance). (Sri Guru Granth Sahib, page 1373).

-Amrit Pal Singh 'Amrit'

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Pheena,

You may well be right. However, the difficulty that I have with this type of philanthropy is that it appears to be unconnected with any form of duty or obligation. The underlying principle seems to be one big grey area. Why is this action considered "good"? Drunkenness is always a temporary condition, which wears off over time. In order to get as drunk as this old man, you have to knowingly drink to great excess.

The old man was a stranger to Neo, so there is no duty from that quarter. Also, there is no religious duty to help drunks home (although it does seem a kind thing to do) - it does not correspond with feeding the hungry, etc.

Thinking about the karma this type of action will produce, I'm not sure if it would necessarily be good. Without a doubt, it's an evil for any creature to get completely wasted on drugs or alcohol well in excess of their tolerance threshold. Therefore, in making things easier for a drunk in his quest to poison himself with alcohol by chauffering him back home from his disgusting binge, surely you would be complicit in the crime (against dharam)?

I equate this scenario with the drunk I see if I leave work late in the evening. Others give him a few coins to assuage their conscience, but I would never give him anything because he will just p*** it all up the wall. He came up to me once and asked specifically for money, so that he could buy drink "to help him sleep". He then presented this to me as the virtue of truthfulness. I told him truthfully I would never help him in his pursuit to get drunk.

Drinking to excess has terrible physiological and psychological effects. A drinker has to face up to this reality and feel the pain in full, in order to realise that he needs his faculties as sharp as a knife to make it through life. If he has to face that difficulty regularly (i.e. as often as he gets drunk) he may decide to quit drinking. This will happen because people drink to take the harshness out of the reality of their lives, and if they find that drinking only brings more harshness they will make a simple equation and give up.

The knock-on effect of Neo's actions in particular (not knocking Neo here - I'm sure he's a nice guy who was well-meaning on that occasion) will mean that the jealous and macho Punjabi - whose pride has been dented by needing the help of someone he looks on as a child just to take him home - will take it out on his wife or children (if he has any). This is because he will feel worthless and humiliated. He will beat them, throw them out of the house a few times, etc. That's what drunks do. Without exception.

Veer, You bring valid points, but you fail to understand what compassion is. Compassion does not invovle intellect. God is Compassionate, he give regardless of what you might do with his gift and when you do screw it up, he gives it again and again. I have been going thru birth to birth screwing up, yet he still is compassionate that he gives me one more chance. If he would use his intellect he should've destroyed me just as easily as i have failed time and time again. But his compassion overtakes his intellect. As is the story you presented of the Scorpion and the Saviour. I have fallen many times, but he extends his hand again and again to help me up. You think god does not know what I will do if he were to give me million of dollars, he knows that there is a chance that i will waste it over maya, yet he gives. He knows and he still gives. That is Compassion and forgiveness. You buy your kids expensive toys when you know he will use them for a few days and lose interest or perhaps break them, but you still buy. Your love and compassion make you do that.

"Har bin thooja Koi Nahi" There is no stranger in this world, if there is no other but god, then who are you and who is the stranger?

You are absolutly correct by not giving any money to that man that you met after work. You would be feeding his bad habits. That was a wise decision, because he asked you feed him poision and why should you. But in the Case of Neo, Neo did not realize until he got close to the man that he was drunk. Upon approching him either subconciously or conciously he decided to take the man home before he causes harm to himself or someone else by expressing Dhaya/Compassion. Your statement of the man taking out the anger on his family is biased, as just as easily that man could be embarressed that a young man took him home. How stupid he might have looked in front of that young man. The possibitliy of him hurting himself was just as great as you say him taking it out on his family. You think if and when he had gotten home he still wouldn't have taken his anger and frustration out on his family?

It does not matter if Neo taking him home will effect him Positivly or Negativly. He was given another chance. If he takes it then good, if he doesn't its his loss. What Waheguru did thru neo was give this man another chance, perhaps something in him will arise that will make him question how he got home. Perhpas that will make him realize the dis-honor he brought upon himself. Perhaps. He was taken home without considering if he is going to do the same thing tomorrow. Neo didn't take him home because he might quit drinking, he took him home because he felt it was the right thing to do at that time. If he had sat down and started to think and contemplate on his actions, if it will do him good or not, then nothing would have gotten done, his mind would've have overpowered his heart. As is the case that sometimes when we want to do something good, the mind creates thousands of reasons why we shouldn't, Does he deserve it?? Does he need it? The time passes by and we are still comtemplating on it. I am not saying not to be Wise about decisions, but one should listen to his heart just as much if not more.

The mind gets in the way of the Heart. The heart says compassion, the mind bring intellect. The choice is always yours on which you listen to. They are both good to have, but only one of them is needed to reach God. The other is to use in the world. So do not take this as i am saying not to use your brain, but use it wisely, know when it is necessary and when it is not.

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I think yu did a really nice thing today cuz not many ppl have that kind of patience in themselves to do something good for another person and to hear them critisize them. Mayb yu should go bak wun day n talk 2 hiz family. Mayb they're not really that aware of how serious he drinks. Buh Wunce agn imma tell u tha u did a really good thing..itz ppl like yu tha give sikhz a good name... :thumbsup:

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I think yu did a really nice thing today cuz not many ppl have that kind of patience in themselves to do something good for another person and to hear them critisize them. Mayb yu should go bak wun day n talk 2 hiz family. Mayb they're not really that aware of how serious he drinks. Buh Wunce agn imma tell u tha u did a really good thing..itz ppl like yu tha give sikhz a good name... :thumbsup:

Everybody have that feeling my dear, but that one is overruled by the selfishness and ego feelings of ours.

Check URself dont u have this one in U so does all....

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