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The high moral character of Sri Laxman Ji


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Sri Laxman Ji was Sri Ram Chander Ji's younger brother. After Sita Mai was kidnapped by Ravan, she threw her jewelery on the path he took her from, thus leaving behind a trail for Sri Ram Chander Ji. The jewelery included her ear rings, necklace, bangles etc. and aslo the small rings she wore on the fingers in her feet. Sri Ram Chander Ji recognized her jewelery, but Laxman was able to recognize only the rings she wore in her feet, as he never gazed on her above her feet. It has been a well known fact throughout history that Sri Laxman Ji never ever gazed upon any woman above her feet.

May Guru Sahib bless all of us with such a high moral character!

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That's true. Sri Lakshman is a inspiration for all of us. He only knew Sita Jee from her feet. He never looked above them.

Compare that to todays men who are completely perverted and have little or no moral values left. Today even a sister inlaw(Bhaabi) is considered fair game, but not too long ago a sister in law was respected and honoured as a mother.

I don't understand why morality is so low in today's world. Only one's real sister, mother and daughter are respected while all other women are given dirty looks. Of all the semitic prophets, I only respect Jesus Christ because of his high moral values. He said:

But I say unto you, “That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart.”

But Jesus was an exception to the rule when it came to Abrahamic prophets. In Indian traditions having high moral values is considered one of the greated virtues a man and woman can have. Today Sikhs both men and women have very low moral values. Today the situation is so bad that people who try to live a life of high morals are laughed at and ridiculed.

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in the introduction to the Dasam Granth there is a sakhi where Maharaj blesses a woman by touching her with the tip of his arrow. She asks him why he did not touch her with his hand, and he says "I have never, and will never ever touch a woman besides my own wife".

very beautiful. A similiar story can be found with Imam Ali when he was fighting Aisha in war and he sent a man to pick her arm and bring her to him. she said "how dare you touch me?" (as it is haram for a muslim man to touch a woman) whereas the man removed his scarf and she saw that it was her brother. Imam Ali sent her brother to go get her instead of letting a non-family member touch her.

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A similiar story can be found with Imam Ali when he was fighting Aisha in war and he sent a man to pick her arm and bring her to him. she said "how dare you touch me?" (as it is haram for a muslim man to touch a woman) whereas the man removed his scarf and she saw that it was her brother. Imam Ali sent her brother to go get her instead of letting a non-family member touch her.

True, Imam Ali was also a man with high moral values. He's probably the person within the Islamic tradition that I would respect in this regard.

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Another story that comes to my mind is about Arjuna from Mahabharata.

The wife of Indra , Apsara, tried to seduce Arjuna into having relation with her. But Arjuna was very firm in his thoughts and addressed the Apsara as mother.

Why were people so strong in their beliefs ? There was no dearth of beautiful women but still they had such a strong resolve in their minds.

But on the other hand we also see rishis and munis falling prey to the beauty of a woman.

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i love how on tapoban.org someone replied to this post by saying

"please read hum hindu nahi"

may maharaj bless them...

anyways this is a great tid bit of info, im going thru the ramayana actually for a course, its very interesting. i havnt looked at the ramavatar in dasamgranth yet, but will do shortly to see differences/similiarites.

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i love how on tapoban.org someone replied to this post by saying

"please read hum hindu nahi"

may maharaj bless them...

anyways this is a great tid bit of info, im going thru the ramayana actually for a course, its very interesting. i havnt looked at the ramavatar in dasamgranth yet, but will do shortly to see differences/similiarites.

It's funny seeing how some people on that site have so much allergy of Hinduism. I think Kulbir Singh jee did an excellent job in replying to them. But some people there start to put everyone down by saying they are RSS if they praise anyone of the Hindu Dharm. Sadly this very common in our Panth today.

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http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/24869

http://www.valmikiramayan.net/

That sounds like a good project jsingh, I look forward to reading it.

Not sure if you have Sahanskriti knowledge, but above are some English translations, although I am sure you must already have much better resources in place.

Good luck and enjoy it!

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its a fun project, intially i wasnt going to do this. my professor, who i am close to, requested that i join a 'class' that he is doing with 2 other students. two other students wanted to go thru the ramayana on my profs, but my prof made it a real class, so i get a credit. he told me if im interested do it.

we have a paper at teh end of the course, after going thru the ramayana, and i suggested that i do a comparison, he loved the idea.

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to be honest im in a political science degree, but ive taken so many religious courses i could be a religion major.

ive taken preety much everything even related to 'hinduism', which is like 5-6 courses already, and still got 2 years left in my program.

the only thing holding me back from getting a double major is the fact that they have a a few courses that are mandatory and they something im not really interested in, ie. ancient greek/roman civiliations, among other things

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ancient greeks and romans had some interesting religious ideas. Not as deep as the east though. For a glimpse of Stoic thought, which had a big influence on early Christianity, check out the Meditations, journal of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. A lot of it, such the emphasis on not being attached to worldly pleasures, ideas similar to reincarnation, and emphasis on impermanance reminds me of Gurmat.

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to be honest, i just love the stuff the 'hinduism' courses, even tho i have taken intro to christianity, judaism, and islam. i have studied courses about socrates,plato etc, and i find more interest in the indian traditions. my professor is doing research on kashmiri shaivism, so we have some interesting talks.

i have taken modern 'hinduism' (we studied 'hinduism' from just before british period to now, people like roy, gandhi, vivekananda, among many others),

formative 'hinduism' (we went through the vedas not in depth, upanishads, gita, other philosophical texts),

indian asthetics,

intro to eastern religions, (we went in depth of 'hinduism', ie. most of the groups, buddhism, tao, confucius etc)

at the start of my undergrad my professor was tutoring me with sanskrit, but i have left it after some months because its something that requires extreme dedication (invovling years of learning), which i chose not to do.

i love the ramayana, such a interesting story. havnt started going through maharajs ramavatar yet, but will be interesting.

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Studying Greek philosophy is an amazing opportunity. In my own research I have cmoe across so many references to India, Brahmans, practices, sciences, music...

Theory has it that Alexanders scholars learnt and took back much knowledge from India - which was then spread through the latter Christian and Islamic worlds. The Greek Philosophers had great respect for teh Indian Philosophers (Brahmans).

I think studying Greek texts is an amazing research opportunity to find and expose cultural, artistic, political and religious practice that was extant in India over 2,000 years ago - a 3rd party observation.

One great example of this is the Greek adoption of the Indian Heptatonic scale system - which was huge jump in musical evolution for Europe...

You will also find may similarities between the Greek and Hindu religious/mythological characters/stories/systems i.e. different Gods representing unique attributes - the imagination used is uncannily similar....

Fascinating subject.

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  • 1 year later...

What happened to Jsingh?

I wonder if he ever did that comparison of Ram Avtaar with the Sanskrit original?

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